House of Commons Hansard #40 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was firearms.

Topics

Persons with Disabilities
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Brant
Ontario

Liberal

Jane Stewart Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, I can tell the hon. member that provincial ministers and myself have agreed on a framework of action that deals with the question of employability, supply and demand. We want to ensure that EAPD moneys are reflected against that framework and can be leveraged with existing provincial moneys.

The hon. member can rest assured that the government is committed to ensuring that Canadians with disabilities can exercise their full rights as citizens in this country.

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Rick Borotsik Brandon—Souris, MB

Mr. Speaker, we know that the ratification of the Kyoto protocol will adversely affect agriculture. All agriculture stakeholders have said emphatically that carbon sink credits must be given to the owner of the property. The federal government has been somewhat reluctant to agree to that.

Will the Minister of Agriculture stand today and tell us that agricultural carbon sink credits will go to agricultural landowners?

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Victoria
B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the first correction needed is in the first words of the hon. member's preamble to his question.

The fact is if we do not act on climate change agriculture in Canada will be dramatically and negatively impacted. We will see large areas, particularly areas that depend upon the eastern slope of the Rockies for their water supplies, literally disappearing as agricultural sectors for the Canadian economy.

That is why it is so important for the agricultural community, and in particular the agricultural community in Alberta, to understand that we must have measures to reduce the impact of climate change on the agricultural industry.

Agropur Plant in Chambord
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Joe Clark Calgary Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, last week, the Secretary of State responsible for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec confirmed in this House that he had met with stakeholders in the matter of the Agropur plant in Chambord. He assured them that the federal government would provide financial support for the local consortium that wants to reopen the plant.

What is the nature and amount of the federal assistance, and when can the consortium expect to receive a cheque?

Agropur Plant in Chambord
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Beauce
Québec

Liberal

Claude Drouin Secretary of State (Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec)

Mr. Speaker, when I met with the people from the plant in Chambord last Monday, along with our candidate, Gilbert Tremblay, who is doing an excellent job in supporting people, we indicated that we were prepared to work together with them on a feasibility study.

However, the hon. member should understand that we need to see the plans before we can determine how much money will be granted.

We assured them we would work in cooperation with them, and that is what we will do.

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

December 6th, 2002 / 11:45 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Howard Hilstrom Selkirk—Interlake, MB

Mr. Speaker, the government is blindly stampeding the Canadian economy over a financial cliff to sure disaster if it ratifies the Kyoto agreement. On Tuesday, the agriculture department's assistant deputy minister for research said that his bureau still has not done a cost benefit analysis of the impact Kyoto will have on agriculture.

Why has this research not been done?

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Victoria
B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, we have done extensive research on the major sectors of the Canadian economy.

The issue for the hon. member who comes from Alberta is why he is not recognizing the importance of dealing with a long term problem which will literally eliminate the type of agriculture we now have on the areas of the prairies dependent upon the eastern slope of the Rockies for the flow of water, particularly the flows in the summer times.

It is really incredible that this party has not understood the impact that climate change could have on prairie agriculture.

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

David Anderson Cypress Hills—Grasslands, SK

Mr. Speaker, the member who asked the question is from Manitoba, and agriculture was not one of the sectors studied. In fact the government's modelling was so bad that we were told that one of its main assumptions was that petroleum producers could not even pass their costs onto farmers.

In 1998 a study conducted by our largest trading partner, the U.S., determined that implementing Kyoto would increase farm expenses by 32%, diminish agricultural exports, and put farmers out of business. They called the Kyoto protocol “the single biggest public policy threat to the agricultural community today”.

Is it not true that the reason the government has hidden its results from farmers is because its conclusions confirm the results of the U.S. study?

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Prince Edward—Hastings
Ontario

Liberal

Lyle Vanclief Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, I think what is true is that this party, as it always has been on so many issues, is behind the times.

The hon. member said himself that it was a 1998 study, one which many other studies and all other studies have said was not done well and in fact is not relevant to the situation today.

The specific question that the head of research in Agriculture Canada was asked the other day was if there were specific projects in research in Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and the individual said no. However the policy and the overall review has been done and I will be informing--

Kyoto Protocol
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. member for Terrebonne--Blainville.

Public Service of Canada
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Diane Bourgeois Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, we know that 21% of federal public servants in general report that they have been subjected to harassment. The situation is comparable in the prisons.

Can the Solicitor General inform us of what efforts have been made by his department to ensure effective application of the policy on harassment policy by Correctional Services?

Public Service of Canada
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Malpeque
P.E.I.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I can assure the hon. member that the RCMP and other agencies under the department of the Solicitor General do take these matters seriously. We ensure that the guidelines, as established for the Government of Canada and the Human Rights Commission, are in fact followed, and if they are not, there would be penalties.

Public Service of Canada
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Diane Bourgeois Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, we know that the government is currently investing considerable sums to determine the extent of the problem, but there was a report back in 1999 that pointed out that there was much still to be done to eliminate harassment from federal workplaces.

How many reports does the Solicitor General need before actually implementing the harassment policy in his department's facilities?

Public Service of Canada
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Malpeque
P.E.I.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, we always welcome reports that outline if there is a problem in any area. The Treasury Board minister yesterday mentioned that progress was not made to the extent that had been fully hoped, but what these reports do for us is give us an analysis of areas where there should be improvement.

I can assure the House that the Government of Canada is working on improvements because harassment should not take place in the workplace.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Maurice Vellacott Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, SK

Mr. Speaker, in 1993 the Liberal red book promised to establish an independent claims commission to resolve certain types of disputes between the government and first nations. In 1998 a joint task force report from the government and first nations also concluded that a claims commission should be independent and not controlled by the government, but in Bill C-6 the government has broken its promise to have a truly independent claims commission. In committee, the government rejected all amendments that would have brought independence to the commission.

Why is the Indian affairs minister no longer committed to an independent claims commission?