House of Commons Hansard #40 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was firearms.

Topics

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have two petitions. The first petition is on the defence of marriage. The petitioners from across Canada, including from my own riding of Mississauga South, would like to bring to the attention of Parliament that social policies should be decided by elected members of Parliament and not the unelected judiciary, and also that the majority of Canadians do support the current legal definition of marriage.

The petitioners therefore call upon Parliament to use all possible legislative and administrative measures, including invoking the notwithstanding clause, section 33 of the charter, to preserve and protect the current definition of marriage of one man and one woman, to the exclusion of all others.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Liberal

Paul Szabo Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, the second petition has to do with the issue of stem cell research. The petitioners who believe, as I do, that life begins at conception support stem cell research. The issue for them is from where they come. from. They point out that adult stem cells have shown great promise, without the immune rejection or ethical problems associated with embryonic stem cells.

Therefore, they call upon Parliament to focus its legislative support on adult stem cell research to find the cures and therapies necessary for Canadians.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:15 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Cheryl Gallant Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

Mr. Speaker, the petitioners of Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke are petitioning the government to make good on its promise to renovate the Arnprior College for Emergency Preparedness. They recognize that the training for emergency situations is of national importance, especially in our heightened state of alert on terrorism at this point in time.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Maurice Vellacott Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, SK

Mr. Speaker, this petition is signed by several hundred petitioners who draw attention to the fact that thousands of Canadians suffer from various debilitating diseases and that Canadians do support ethical stem cell research. The petitioners point out that non-embryonic stem cells which are also known as adult stem cells have shown significant research progress without the immune rejection or ethical problems associated with embryonic stem cells.

They call upon Parliament to focus its legislative support and dollars on adult stem cell research to find the cures and therapies necessary to treat the illnesses and diseases of Canadians.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Maurice Vellacott Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, SK

Mr. Speaker, I have another petition to present today in respect of child pornography.

The petitioners draw attention to the fact that the creation and use of child pornography is condemned by the clear majority of Canadians and that the courts have not applied the current child pornography law in a way which makes it clear that such exploitation will always be met with swift punishment.

They call upon Parliament to protect our children by taking the necessary steps to ensure that all materials which promote or glorify pedophilia or sado-masochistic activities involving children are outlawed.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Maurice Vellacott Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, SK

Mr. Speaker, my third petition is signed by residents of Canada who draw the attention of the House to the fact that modern science has unequivocally and irrefutably established that a human being begins to exist at the moment of conception.

The petitioners call upon Parliament to bring in legislation defining a human fetus or embryo from the moment of conception whether in the womb of the mother or not, and whether conceived naturally or otherwise, as a human being and to make any and all consequential amendments to all Canadian laws as required.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:20 p.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I wonder if I might ask the indulgence of the House to go back to the item on the agenda which deals with the introduction of private member's bills. I seek the unanimous consent of the House to do that so I may introduce my bill. I would appreciate that.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:20 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Does the hon. member for Vancouver East have the consent of the House to revert back to the introduction of private member's bills?

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act
Routine Proceedings

12:20 p.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-329, an act to amend the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act (student loan).

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank members of the House for giving their consent so I can present my bill.

I am honoured to present this bill in the House today. Its purpose is to reverse and stop discrimination facing students who are now required to wait ten years before they can declare bankruptcy. The new ten year rule means that unlike other consumers who wait two years to declare bankruptcy, students must face additional hardship and discrimination.

The overwhelming majority of students do everything they can to repay their student loans but when bankruptcy becomes the only option, the bill I am presenting today would ensure that students would get a fair deal and would not be discriminated against.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:20 p.m.

Halifax West
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the following question will be answered today: No. 39.

Question No. 39
Routine Proceedings

December 6th, 2002 / 12:20 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

With respect to the Air Travellers Security Charge announced in the December 2001 Budget that took affect on May 1, 2002, and subsequent announcements by the Ministers of Finance and Transport that the tax would be adjusted downward if the government collected more revenue than necessary to improve air security: ( a ) what are the revenues from the tax; ( b ) how much of the revenue collected since May 1, 2002 has gone into (i) the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority, and (ii) general revenue; ( c ) if monies have gone into general revenue, how has this money been spent to improve air security; and ( d ) when will the Minister of Finance announce an adjustment to the tax?

Question No. 39
Routine Proceedings

12:20 p.m.

Oak Ridges
Ontario

Liberal

Bryon Wilfert Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, Revenue from the charge is reported monthly in The Fiscal Monitor published by the Department of Finance. Revenue for the first four months of operation, April through July 2002,totals roughly $122 million, composed of monthly remittances of $20 million, $28 million, $34 million and $36 million, plus an estimated $1 million per month from the GST/HST. Based on collections to date, ongoing full year revenue from the charge, including applicable GST, is estimated to be in the range of $400 million to $420 million per year.

The total cost of the enhanced air travel security system is expected to be $2.2 billion through 2006-07. Budget 2001 provided that revenue from the charge would be maintained in line with expected expenditures on the enhanced air travel security system through 2006-07. The government is committed to reviewing the charge over time to ensure that revenue remains in line with the costs of enhanced security.

The government has begun the process of reviewing the charge. The government has indicated that if revenue is projected to exceed planned expenditures through 2006-07, the charge will be reduced.

Under the government’s current five year forecast, which is based on ATSC collections and air traffic data observed to date, revenue from the charge is not expected to exceed the cost of enhanced air security as set out in budget 2001. As such, there is little scope for reducing the charge at the present time. However, the government’s change to accrual accounting, possibly as early as budget 2003, could provide an opportunity for reducing the charge. Under accrual accounting, the costs to be recovered from the charge through 2006-07 may be lower than those set out in budget 2001.

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

12:20 p.m.

Halifax West
Nova Scotia

Liberal

Geoff Regan Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, if Questions Nos. 26, 30, 31, 32 and 33 could be made orders for return, the returns would be tabled immediately.

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

12:20 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Is that agreed?