House of Commons Hansard #70 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was yukon.

Topics

International Women's Day
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

NDP

Wendy Lill Dartmouth, NS

Mr. Speaker, International Women's Day on March 8 is a day to reflect on how much women have achieved as we move toward a world of gender equality free from sexism.

It is a day to commemorate women like Nancy Riche, who recently won the AFL-CIO 2002 human rights award for her tireless work to improve the lives of working women around the world.

However women in Canada still face very real problems: 19% live in poverty and women on average still only earn 64% of men's salaries.

How is the government responding? Instead of changing EI rules for part time workers, most of whom are women, the Liberals hiked RRSP limits, which help less than 2% of women workers, and they have only delivered 3,000 of the 150,000 day care spaces needed for working women and their families.

It is time to start taking women's issues seriously again instead of sweeping them under the carpet or hoping that surfing the net, the theme from Status of Women Canada, will bring about women's equality.

Winter Games
Statements By Members

February 28th, 2003 / 11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Caroline St-Hilaire Longueuil, QC

Mr. Speaker, we have already been dazzled by the Canada Games that will run until March 8. The magnificent performances so far all point to excellent results at the next Olympics.

I am very proud to underscore the excellence of our athletes from Quebec, who were leading in the medal count this week. The women's short track speed skaters, including four from Longueuil, made us especially proud when they swept the medals in both the 500 metre and 1,500 metre events.

And we can look forward to more because today marks the beginning of the 38th Finale des Jeux du Québec in the beautiful region of Portneuf.

On behalf of my colleagues from the Bloc Quebecois, I would like to congratulate the thousands of athletes and all the organizers and volunteers who contributed to the success of these two large gatherings of sport's finest.

Congratulations to everyone.

Suzanne Rochon Burnett
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Tony Tirabassi Niagara Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to some of the accomplishments of my constituent, Suzanne Rochon Burnett.

Suzanne is a proud Metis who began her broadcast career in Quebec in the 1950s. She eventually moved to the Niagara Peninsula and by 1974 she had developed the highly successful radio program Chanson à la Française . Suzanne was also a regular on CBC's Morningside .

In 1995 Suzanne's company purchased the business that operated radio station C-HOW in the Niagara. She applied to the CRTC for an FM frequency and was granted a licence.

Suzanne is a strong supporter of business, the arts and broadcasting in native communities. She is a member of countless arts and cultural boards, and has received numerous awards and medals, including the Order of Canada.

I congratulate Suzanne. She has made our community a better place in which to live.

Canadian Forces
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Peter MacKay Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough, NS

Mr. Speaker, our military has been in desperate need of new helicopters for over two decades and yesterday's accident on the HMCS Iroquois demonstrates how starving our military of resources has put Canadian's lives at risk.

At the same time a Sea King helicopter was crash landing on the deck of the Iroquois , we saw a smiling Prime Minister disembarking from his brand new Challenger.

When the government hides the $100 million price tag for two luxury Challengers from the public, where is the transparency? Where are this government's priorities?

The Liberals' legacy of waste and mismanagement results in a blatant disregard for the money and safety of others. The HRDC fiasco, Shawinigate, corrupt ad contracts, a billion dollars on a failed long gun registry, a ballooning bureaucracy and our international reputation is in decline.

Choose your Prime Minister carefully.

When we pick a Prime Minister we often pick our priorities. Life-saving helicopters or luxury jets, which would we choose?

Black History Month
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Paul MacKlin Northumberland, ON

Mr. Speaker, February is Black History Month. It is a time for all Canadians to experience a part of their history and explore role models that they might not have recognized before.

Molly Killingbeck is an athlete, a coach, a leader and just one of many shining examples of female black Canadian role models.

Killingbeck began her love of sports at a young age with her love of running. Through dedication and hard work, she trained to become one of Canada's top female athletes in track and field. Her love of sport propelled her to many heights, from coaching the gold medal winning men's relay team in 1996 to her current position as an athlete services manager with the National Sport Centre of Ontario.

Following her experiences, she was inspired to campaign for a tighter anti-drug program.

Dedication and a healthy dose of fun keep Killingbeck strongly connected to the world of sport. As a coach, Killingbeck works to instill qualities in athletes that they can use on and off the track. For her, it is important to see all athletes as people first before viewing them as performers.

I ask all members to please join me in saluting Molly Killingbeck and all black Canadians who are role models for Canadian youth.

Gasoline Taxes
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Gurmant Grewal Surrey Central, BC

Mr. Speaker, the transport minister thinks our cities should start charging road tolls. There is a better idea.

The Liberals should start giving provinces their fair share of gas tax revenue. Thirty eight per cent of what we are paying at the pumps goes into government coffers. The government rakes in nearly $5 billion in gas taxes annually, but it spends merely $113 million on roadway development, just two and a quarter per cent. As gasoline prices soar, so do government revenues as the Liberals continue to charge taxes on taxes. The Ottawa gas tax rip-off is highway robbery.

Transportation is critical to B.C.'s economy and public safety. Money is needed for repairs to the Sea to Sky Highway and public transit, but instead the government has one boondoggle after another.

The government should dedicate more of the gasoline taxes to highway spending, eliminate the one and a half cent per litre deficit-financing gasoline tax and stop charging GST on gasoline taxes.

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Dale Johnston Wetaskiwin, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Parker report has clearly stated that ministers should not operate family businesses under blind management agreements. The transport minister has conceded that changes to the government's ethics code may be necessary.

Will the government now admit that ministers should not be able to personally manage their holdings and be in cabinet at the same time?

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, we have been consistent in dealing with this matter in the last few days. The fact is that the present code of conduct did emanate from certain deliberations made by the former government and following Justice Parker's report, and we have followed those procedures. In the case of the former minister of finance, he followed all the rules and that has been confirmed by the ethics counsellor.

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Dale Johnston Wetaskiwin, AB

Maybe he followed all the rules, but the rules should be changed, Mr. Speaker.

The former finance minister is not covered by a blind trust but by a one of a kind supervisory agreement, whatever that is. That allows him to have direct input into his company. He now says that as Prime Minister he would change that and make an even better deal for himself.

Ethics should apply to all cabinet ministers, including the Prime Minister. Why should the government ethics package allow a special deal for this Prime Minister wannabe?

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I can understand that the hon. member has some strong views on this particular issue and I would invite him to go to committee where this matter is now under review and make his points. He is a member of that committee, I am told, therefore he has the full advantage of going to the committee, making these arguments and trying to change the policy.

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Dale Johnston Wetaskiwin, AB

Mr. Speaker, the minister can count on us making a presentation to that committee.

The former finance minister's proposal for avoiding conflicts of interest, though, is to simply excuse himself from cabinet. When his businesses and personal holdings are directly affected by almost every government department, he will certainly be spending a lot of time in the hallways. Will the government commit to ethics guidelines that prohibit the Prime Minister from having personal control over his holdings? Yes or no.

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I am sorry that the hon. member seems to be a bit under weather. I could not catch the full purport of his question, but I would say that the matter to which he refers about whatever happens at a Liberal leadership is hypothetical and we will not enter into those discussions.

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jay Hill Prince George—Peace River, BC

Mr. Speaker, I think it is the former finance minister that is about to be under the weather. The former finance minister had a special supervisory deal and has now asked for yet another tailor-made arrangement. Entrepreneurs in cabinet have only two options: to divest themselves of their assets or to put those assets into a true, and I emphasize true, blind trust. Will the government now admit that the only way to remove the perception of a conflict of interest is to have ministers divest themselves of private holdings as they do in the United States?

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Again, Mr. Speaker, I will take this as representations. The hon. member should really be making these kinds of suggestions at committee.

Again, to repeat, the former minister of finance followed all the rules. He conducted himself in an exemplary fashion while he was in cabinet. The issue of the meetings and what was discussed at the meetings has been reported on by the ethics commissioner, who said that there was no cause for concern in any of the meetings which he attended.

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:15 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jay Hill Prince George—Peace River, BC

Mr. Speaker, the only reason the former finance minister was able to follow all the rules is that they were so loose he could drive one of his ships right through them. The former finance minister received numerous private briefings from the Liberals' very own ethics counsellor. How many and on what issues, both of them refuse to say. Why is it the job of the ethics counsellor to protect the wannabe Prime Minister from public relations embarrassment?