House of Commons Hansard #70 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was yukon.

Topics

Ethics
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, discussions between the former minister of finance and Mr. Wilson, the ethics counsellor, were private conversations. No one is entitled to know what was going on unless either of those two gentlemen made the information public and spoke about the process.

The Prime Minister put in place a code of conduct based on a code of conduct developed by the government of which the right hon. member was a member of and the recommendations of the Parker committee. All the rules were followed.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

February 28th, 2003 / 11:25 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Joe Clark Calgary Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, the minister knows that last allegation is false. But if he believes it is true, he could always table the documents on the floor of the House of Commons that prove its veracity.

I have a question for the foreign minister.

The New York Times reports this morning that the Pentagon is preparing contingency plans for a possible U.S. attack on nuclear power stations in North Korea.

Can the foreign minister confirm that the Government of Canada has information to that effect? Will he indicate whether the Government of Canada is aware of such plans? Will he outline what Canada's position will be?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Toronto Centre—Rosedale
Ontario

Liberal

Bill Graham Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I am aware of the reports to which the right hon. member makes reference, but I cannot verify them from a direct contact with the United States government. I can tell the right hon. member, however, that the situation in North Korea remains a preoccupation for us, of course.

I had a long conversation with the foreign minister of China last night. We spent a long time trying to work together to see how the international community can bring the United States and North Korea together, and how we can diffuse this. I find it difficult to believe the United States would be contemplating anything which would disturb the delicate equilibrium there, but we will continue to work with all parties to ensure this crisis is diffused peacefully.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:25 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Deborah Grey Edmonton North, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister will soon be back from Mexico. I am sure he will be red-faced, but it probably will not be from a sunburn. His face should be burning with embarrassment as a result of the Sea King crash yesterday.

The Prime Minister and the Liberal government have put Canadian lives at risk by cancelling, 10 years ago, the EH-101 contract and delaying the purchase of Maritime helicopter replacements. Now we face international embarrassment because our allies cannot even rely on our 40 year old equipment.

Why does the Prime Minister continue to put saving face before saving lives?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Beauséjour—Petitcodiac
New Brunswick

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the Maritime helicopter procurement project has been a priority for the Minister of National Defence and for the government. We have said that our goal is to obtain the best aircraft as quickly as possible.

To simply make outrageous allegations about unsafe aircraft which simply are not true does not help the confidence of the men and women of our Canadian Forces. At no time do we operate unsafe aircraft.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Deborah Grey Edmonton North, AB

They certainly have their confidence undermined, Mr. Speaker. He says it is a priority for the government. It surely is, but it is a pathetically low priority.

This week the defence minister said that he could not just snap his fingers and get new helicopter replacements. Oddly enough it took only days to get a luxury Challenger jet for the Prime Minister and his Challenger chums. That was untendered.

We now learn that the frigate HMCS Fredericton is on its way to replace the HMCS Iroquois when the government said not long ago that those frigates were just too small for command ships. The government does not know what it is doing.

Why does it take years for our troops to get what they need, but only days for the Prime Minister to get what he wants?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Beauséjour—Petitcodiac
New Brunswick

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, surely the hon. member is not suggesting that the Maritime helicopter project proceed by way of an untendered contract.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the House of Commons debated a motion sponsored by the Bloc Quebecois, calling on the federal government to ratify the Cartagena protocol on biosafety as soon as possible.

Can the Minister of the Environment tell us whether his government intends to ratify the protocol under the precautionary principle that he himself supported in 1992?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Vancouver South—Burnaby
B.C.

Liberal

Herb Dhaliwal Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the government is looking at the Cartagena agreement. At this time we are working with farmers who have certain concerns. We want to ensure that we make a well informed decision, and work with the stakeholders and farmers of this country. We are working at other ways to ensure we comply with the principles of that agreement and we will continue to work in that way.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, on January 27, 2000, the Minister of the Environment said that he believed, and I quote, “—that a strong Biosafety Protocol under the Biodiversity Convention is in the interests of all nations.”

Can the Minister of the Environment tell us what has changed in three years and why he is not committed to joining the list of 44 countries that have ratified the Cartagena protocol?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Vancouver South—Burnaby
B.C.

Liberal

Herb Dhaliwal Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, as I have said, we agree with the principles outlined in the Cartagena biosafety agreement. We must ensure that we consult with farmers and have their views. Nothing has changed. We are also working on a bilateral agreement so that we can ensure that we comply with those principles.

I am sure the hon. member will want to ensure that we take into consideration the views and concerns of farmers, and that we continue to work with them. We very much support the principles outlined in Cartagena and our position has not changed.

Government Contracts
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

Ken Epp Elk Island, AB

Mr. Speaker, Liberal leadership candidate, the Minister of Canadian Heritage, has close to $1 billion a year to spend on pet projects. One of those projects is the HMCS Haida that is to end up in Hamilton harbour as a floating museum. Here is a surprise, CSE Marine Services Inc., a subsidiary of Canada Steamship Lines, has the contract.

Can the minister of heritage explain why she is funnelling money to the former finance minister's not so blind empire?

Government Contracts
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the removal of HMCS Haida from Toronto to Hamilton was part of the establishment of a waterfront park and marine facility at Hamilton harbour. It is something which is quite laudable. Funds were granted from Canadian Heritage for this restoration. As to who did the contract, as we know, companies, whether they are CSL or others, are private companies and do work based on the proper tendering process.

Technology Partnerships Canada
Oral Question Period

11:30 a.m.

Canadian Alliance

James Rajotte Edmonton Southwest, AB

Mr. Speaker, in October 1997 technology partnerships Canada gave nearly $9 million to Western Star Trucks. It was justified at that time on the basis that it would create more than 1,000 jobs across Canada over a 10 year period. Last June Western Star Trucks moved its manufacturing, engineering, customer support, operations and staff to Portland, Oregon.

Can the industry minister explain why taxpayer dollars are being used to subsidize the movement of Canadian jobs to the United States?

Technology Partnerships Canada
Oral Question Period

11:35 a.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, technology partnerships Canada is an instrument by which we help Canadian companies compete in world markets. In addition to the $2 billion we have invested in this program, $8 billion has been furnished by private sources. We have leveraged private money to create over 38,000 jobs here in Canada.

This enables us to compete with every other country in the world that does similar things to encourage research and development in their economy. The hon. member should know that this is an essential instrument for economic growth.