House of Commons Hansard #53 of the 37th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was gst.

Topics

Sponsorship Program
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, if Bono were more familiar with the record of the Prime Minister, he would surely say “I can't believe the news today”.

Since the Prime Minister has stated very clearly that there had to be political direction and that he was prepared to go before the Standing Committee on Public Accounts, why is he running away now? If he knows something, why is he keeping it from the public? Why has he refused to go before the committee to tell it that he does know something and will disclose it?

What he is telling us today is that he knows something but is concealing it, that he does not want the public to know what this party has been up to, filling its pockets with the taxpayers' money.

Sponsorship Program
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I have made it clear since mid-February that I was prepared to go before the Standing Committee on Public Accounts, the Gomery commission, or anywhere else, and I am saying it again now.

Sponsorship Program
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Caroline St-Hilaire Longueuil, QC

Mr. Speaker, the same day, February 12, the Prime Minister declared, and I quote, “that very few ministers, Quebec ministers, did” know. For the Prime Minister to make such a declaration means that someone knew. Still, he has never identified anyone.

I ask the Prime Minister, who claims to want to shed light on the sponsorship scandal, if he can tell us who, in the current cabinet, did know?

Sponsorship Program
Oral Question Period

2:25 p.m.

Brossard—La Prairie
Québec

Liberal

Jacques Saada Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister responsible for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, it is interesting to see that the people who say they want to know what happened are refusing to report to the public on what has been done so far. There is a stark contradiction.

Commissions have been set up precisely to shed light on all this. But they prefer to make assumptions, for political reasons I leave to your imagination, while what we find much more interesting is the truth of the matter. That is why, exactly, there will be a partial report—a preliminary report.

Sponsorship Program
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Bloc

Caroline St-Hilaire Longueuil, QC

Mr. Speaker, the same day, February 12, the Prime Minister also said, and once again I quote,“anybody who knew about that and did nothing should resign immediately.” Despite the Prime Minister's invitation, no one resigned from the current cabinet.

Therefore, if the Prime Minister today refuses to say what he knows, is it not because certain members of his cabinet could be forced to resign?

Sponsorship Program
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Brossard—La Prairie
Québec

Liberal

Jacques Saada Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister responsible for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, that question comes from a political party whose whip declared in committee that he intended to take—and I quote—“5 hours and 45 minutes—I will do everything to try and go on longer than that” with the aim of preventing the committee from reporting to the people on what has been done.

That is pure and simple hypocrisy.

Health
Oral Question Period

May 12th, 2004 / 2:30 p.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, it is curious to see the official opposition concerned about high gas prices; this is the first time in 25 years. I remember a Tory government that fell because it jacked the price of gas up so high. My question for the Prime Minister--

Health
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh.

Health
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

An hon. member

It would have been higher if it was up to you.

Health
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

The Speaker

Order, please. The hon. member for Winnipeg—Transcona has the floor.

Health
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, I have a very simple question for the Prime Minister. The Conservatives have made their position on for profit delivery of health care very clear. They are for it. They are wrong, but at least they are honest. We have made our position clear. We are against it.

I want to ask the Prime Minister, does he think that for profit delivery of health care has a place in our system, yes or no?

Health
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I have said in this House and I will repeat, the reason we want to have a meeting with the premiers this summer, the reason we want to essentially deal with the health care situation is so that more money will flow, that reform will take place, so that in fact the publicly funded, universally accessible health care system that was put in place by a Liberal government will continue and will strengthen.

Infrastructure
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, note the absence of any comment whatsoever on non-profit delivery of health care versus for profit private delivery. That was a complete evasion of the question.

I want to ask the Prime Minister, are we to be treated to the same mystery when it comes to the Prime Minister's policies on cities? We are told now that there is a great privatization scheme in the works for cities and how to deal with infrastructure in cities, which we are not supposed to know about until the election.

The people at Earnscliffe must be salivating knowing that they are going to have more say than the mayor of Toronto when it comes to spending money on infrastructure. Would the Prime Minister--

Infrastructure
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

The Speaker

The right hon. Prime Minister.

Infrastructure
Oral Question Period

2:30 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I would be delighted to tell the parliamentary leader of the NDP about it. The fact is that Canada's major cities are suffering from urban gridlock. They are suffering from air that is not clean and water that is not clean. We intend to deal with it.

At the same time, we intend to deal with the problems of economic development and homelessness that are found in our smaller communities right across the country.

I am delighted to answer the hon. member's question, as I will many times over the course of the next period, and say we are here to defend Canada's cities and its smallest communities. That is part of our policy and we are going to bring it into being.