House of Commons Hansard #53 of the 37th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was dna.

Topics

Gasoline Prices
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Serge Cardin Sherbrooke, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister wants members of Parliament to play a larger role, but he has brushed aside the proposal by the Standing Committee on Industry to create a petroleum monitoring agency, saying that it would be pointless. He prefers to have the Competition Bureau do another study. And that, even though the oil companies say they are in favour of the creation of the monitoring agency.

Will the Prime Minister recognize that giving an active role to MPs and listening to what they recommend in committee are also ways to reduce the democratic deficit?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Bonavista—Trinity—Conception
Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

R. John Efford Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, I said to all hon. members in this House last Friday that I will talk to the pricing commissioners in Newfoundland and Labrador, in P.E.I. and in Quebec. I will also talk to the industry stakeholders out in western Canada. The Competition Bureau is doing an investigation because of complaints from consumers, based on no facts, just based on complaints from consumers.

When all of that is done, I will report back to the House on my discussions with each one of those organizations.

Gasoline Prices
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Serge Cardin Sherbrooke, QC

Mr. Speaker, at the moment, the government is standing idly by, watching the dizzying rise in the price of gasoline. The Competition Bureau, we know, is completely ineffective. Neither Parliament nor the government have the necessary tools to bring order to this sector.

While the members of the Standing Committee on Industry propose a mechanism for understanding what is going on in the petroleum sector, how can the Prime Minister claim that a petroleum monitoring agency is a useless concept?

Gasoline Prices
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Bonavista—Trinity—Conception
Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

R. John Efford Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, what is it the hon. member does not understand about economics? It is supply and demand. When there is a greater demand, up goes the price. If he needs a course on it, I will give him a full explanation after question period.

Public Service
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Lynne Yelich Blackstrap, SK

Mr. Speaker, two Saskatchewan law students responded to our Monday question about government jobs for students being restricted to residents with certain postal codes around Ottawa.

These students both applied to work in Ottawa under the federal student work experience program which claims fair and equal access. They were told in writing that “we try to place students from the capital region first”.

Why are students in Saskatchewan denied the same job opportunities as those in the national capital region?

Public Service
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, this issue was raised with me by the Minister of Finance some months ago. The president of the Public Service Commission has been informed. She is quite concerned about it. She has spoken to the staff person who responded to these students and is undertaking to contact them herself directly.

Public Service
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Lynne Yelich Blackstrap, SK

Mr. Speaker, we also spoke to the president of the Public Service Commission who could not fix this discrimination by postal code because the President of the Treasury Board refuses to release the funds to implement the plan.

The president of the Public Service Commission has a strategy and a plan; however, the Liberals seem determined to keep Canadians from working in their own capital.

Will the President of the Treasury Board now support the Public Service Commission's request and release funds to fix this inequality or will the Liberals continue to perpetuate this?

Public Service
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, as is not uncommon, the hon. member is mixing two completely different issues. In fact, the president of the Public Service Commission came before the committee and indicated that it had indeed been given money to develop the prototype, that Treasury Board required certain conditions be met, and that it was working toward that.

She said that it was an estimate but at this point she had to add a big caveat because she thought that more detailed work was necessary in terms of how the prototype was going to be moved forward before returning and asking for more money.

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Liberal

Susan Whelan Essex, ON

Mr. Speaker, since 2000, Canada has been affected by the introduction of three devastating imported forest pests, the emerald ash borer in southwestern Ontario, the Asian longhorned beetle in Ontario and the brown spruce longhorn beetle in Halifax.

As part of its aggressive control and eradication campaign, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has ordered many trees destroyed.

Will the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food compensate tree owners for their losses?

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk—Brant
Ontario

Liberal

Bob Speller Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for Essex, and the hon. members for Vaughan—King—Aurora, Etobicoke North, Chatham—Kent Essex and Lambton—Kent—Middlesex for all the support they have given me on this issue.

I would like to inform them and the House that the Government of Canada will be announcing today a $6.5 million compensation package to compensate farmers and families across Canada who have been impacted by the fact that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has had to cut down trees within their communities.

Health
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Rob Merrifield Yellowhead, AB

Mr. Speaker, the government continues to mistreat victims of hepatitis C.

One of my constituents, Phylis Dixon, received a lump sum and $1,000 a year from the compensation fund. However she has just recently been cut off because she could not prove that she contracted hepatitis C in 1988.

Mrs. Dixon is a World War II veteran. She recently had a liver transplant and gets around with a walker. Is this the government's idea of compassion?

Health
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada is quite sensitive to the people living with hepatitis C. I will gladly look into the specific case that the member has raised in the House at this time.

Health
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Rob Merrifield Yellowhead, AB

Mr. Speaker, out of the $1.2 billion, just $366 million has now been paid to the victims. There is far more in the fund, enough to cover all of the victims. We know the government was liable back as far as 1981. What is the government doing with the $800 million left in the fund if it is not looking after people like Mrs. Dixon?

Health
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Papineau—Saint-Denis
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, there has been money invested to help the victims of hepatitis C. We are monitoring the fund with care. We do care for these people with hepatitis C and we will continue to do that job in the next few years.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

May 12th, 2004 / 3 p.m.

Bloc

Christiane Gagnon Québec, QC

Mr. Speaker, the prosecutor for the U.S. government recently said that Mohammed Cherfi posed a threat to public safety in Canada because he had participated in a demonstration at a government building.

Could the Minister of Public Safety confirm whether the Canadian government told the U.S. government that Mohammed Cherfi posed a threat to public safety in Canada? If not, will she rectify these conclusions with the American government?