House of Commons Hansard #135 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was trafficking.

Topics

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, tens of thousands of people have signed petitions in recent years expressing their concern about kidney disease. The petitioners know that progress has been made in the treatment of kidney disease in improved dialysis, for example, and in research to prevent and cure kidney disease. They know a great of that work has been done by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

These citizens call upon Parliament to make research funding available to the Canadian Institutes of Health Research for the explicit purpose of conducting bioartificial kidney research as an extension of the research being successfully conducted and tested at several centres in the United States.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

James Moore Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have two petitions to table in the House today.

I am pleased to present a petition signed by hundreds of Canadians from across Ontario, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. The petition recognizes the growing threat posed by date rape drugs, GHB and rohypnol, when used in the commission of sexual assaults.

The petitioners call upon Parliament to amend the Criminal Code to create a separate schedule for specific date rape drugs, establish a national initiative to educate women on the dangers of date rape drugs and establish a national task force to develop new guidelines in the collection and documentation of evidence in sexual assault investigations to facilitate investigations so we can fight those who are abusing women with date rape drugs.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Conservative

James Moore Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, in my second petition the petitioners wish to draw the attention of the House to the fact that our children need protection from sexual exploitation.

The petitioners therefore call upon Parliament to protect our children by taking all necessary steps to raise the age of sexual consent.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Beauséjour, NB

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to table pursuant to Standing Order 36 a petition signed by many residents of Edmonton, many of them in the constituency of the Deputy Prime Minister.

The petitioners ask Parliament to amend section 83 of the Criminal Code. This is the section with respect to the definition of a prize fight. The petitioners wish an exemption for all martial arts and martial arts contests. I am happy to present this petition in the House.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

I am sure the hon. member from Beauséjour will be able to arrange a quick response from the government to that petition.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Beauséjour, NB

Mr. Speaker, you are aware, as are all hon. members, that the government responds quickly and in a timely way to all petitions. You will not be surprised that this one is very much in the ordinary course of our business as well.

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Beauséjour
New Brunswick

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, if Question No. 174 could be made an order for return, the return would be tabled immediately.

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

Is that agreed?

Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed

Question No. 174
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Conservative

John Cummins Delta—Richmond East, BC

With regard to the anthropological and historical study undertaken by Professor Alexander von Gernet for the Department of Justice entitled, “The Early History of Lobster Harvesting Among Natives and Newcomers in Atlantic Canada”, and the transfer to aboriginals in the Maritime Provinces access to lobster for food, social and ceremonial purposes (Sparrow) and commercial purposes (Marshall): ( a ) what year was identified as the year of first contact between Mi’kmaq and Europeans; ( b ) does the report find evidence or come to a conclusion that lobster was important to the Mi’kmaq prior to contact or at the time of contact with Europeans; ( c ) does the report find evidence or come to a conclusion that lobster was important to the Maliseet prior to contact or at the time of contact with Europeans; ( d ) does the report find evidence of significant lobster harvest by the Mi’kmaq during the first three centuries after contact with Europeans and, if so, what was the evidence or indication of significant harvest or reliance on the harvest of lobster; ( e ) does the report find evidence of a significant Mi’kmaq reliance on lobster as a food source prior to contact or at the time of contact with Europeans; ( f ) does the report find evidence of a significant Mi’kmaq reliance on lobster as a food source in the first three centuries after contact; ( g ) does the report conclude that either individual bands or the Mi’kmaq as a whole relied on lobster for food at this time, and, if so, which bands; ( h ) does the report conclude that there was a significant difference between the reliance of Fraser River aboriginals on salmon and that of the Mi’kmaq on lobster and, if so, what was the difference; ( i ) does the report find evidence that the Europeans were harvesting lobster immediately following contact; ( j ) which Mi’kmaq and Maliseet bands have received licences to harvest lobster for food, social and ceremonial purposes and how much was harvested in each year by each band following the Marshall decisions; ( k ) which Mi’kmaq and Maliseet bands have received licences to harvest lobster for commercial purposes and what was the amount harvested in each year by each band following the Marshall decisions; ( l ) is the decision to provide these food and commercial licences consistent with the findings of the report and, if so, in what way is it consistent with the historical evidence outlined in the report; ( m ) following a review of the report, what action did the Department of Fisheries take to revise its plan to implement the transfer of lobster licences and vessels to aboriginal organizations; and ( n ) how many licensed lobster fishermen (other than aboriginal organizations) were engaged in the public fishery in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003 and 2004 in (i) New Brunswick, (ii) Nova Scotia, and (iii) Prince Edward Island?

(Return table)

Question No. 174
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Beauséjour, NB

Mr. Speaker, I ask that all remaining questions be allowed to stand.

Question No. 174
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

Is that agreed?

Question No. 174
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

The House resumed consideration of the motion that Bill C-63, An Act to amend An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act and the Income Tax Act, be read the second time and referred to a committee.

Canada Elections Act
Government Orders

October 17th, 2005 / 3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

Is the House ready for the question?