House of Commons Hansard #136 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-65.

Topics

Child Care
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, that is not what I said. I said that child care centres fell under provincial jurisdiction, but that it was quite natural for Canadians to say their children ought to be of national interest. This has nothing to do with jurisdiction or authority, but definitely does has a lot to do with a vision of our country and the future of the generations to come.

Child Care
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier, QC

Mr. Speaker, he has just repeated exactly what I said. Continuing with the Prime Minister's line of reasoning, those same children, of national interest according to him, also attend elementary school.

So, will the next step in that reasoning be to conclude that Ottawa will be sticking its nose into elementary schools, which are exclusively under Quebec's jurisdiction, in order to impose its rules and conditions, still in the name of “national” interest?

Child Care
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I have already answered that. The answer is no. I said so yesterday.

There is one thing I do not understand. Canada and Quebec have just achieved an extraordinary victory at UNESCO which protects cultural diversity and is the culmination of a battle waged by Canada and the provinces, Quebec in particular. It is inconceivable to me today that the leader of the Bloc Québécois has not even had the decency to congratulate Quebeckers and Canadians on this victory we have achieved together.

Child Care
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Gauthier Roberval, QC

Mr. Speaker, I can understand that the Prime Minister does not want to answer the Bloc leader's question. However, I want to ask him this. He indicated that he was getting involved in child care, a matter that has absolutely nothing to do with the federal government, because children were of national interest.

My question is quite simple. If he can justify getting involved in child care because children are of national interest, I guess he considers this also justifies getting involved in elementary schools because these same children remain of national interest?

Child Care
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Westmount—Ville-Marie
Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, this is incredible. Unlike the Bloc, we and the Quebec government believe in a Canadian federation. In a federalist system, both levels of government work together to ensure the public good. This is at the heart of everything we do.

Child Care
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Gauthier Roberval, QC

Mr. Speaker, this is a new constitutional theory that enhances the one held by the Prime Minister. Now, we will invite the Quebec government to take care of military problems. This is a federation, we will ask the government to take care of everything. That is the reality.

My question is as follows. How can the government seriously justify the fact that it is poking its nose into child care in Quebec? This network existed long before the federal government. The Prime Minister was on his knees during the last election campaign in order to find out how this network worked. How can he now set national standards?

Child Care
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Westmount—Ville-Marie
Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, this is pure nonsense. It has never been a question of setting national child care standards throughout Canada. Never.

Child Care
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

An hon. member

They want to scare people.

Child Care
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

In fact, everyone agreed to work together, including with the Quebec government. It was never a question of setting conditions and national standards. Instead, it is about working together and supporting this model which may inspire the other provinces.

Health
Oral Questions

October 18th, 2005 / 2:30 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, the NDP has repeatedly asked where the response to the Chaoulli decision is to be found from the government and repeatedly we have been told that no response is necessary, that we already had the response in the $41 billion and that no new rules are required to stop the growth of private health care in Canada.

The Prime Minister said that this was the fight of his life so let me ask a very simply question. Does the federal government need new rules to stop the growth of private health care in this country, yes or no?

Health
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the basis of the Chaoulli decision was that waiting times were too long and as a result the Supreme Court made the decision that it did.

We anticipated this in the election campaign and we anticipated it when we had the federal-provincial conference in which we put the $41 billion over the next 10 years precisely to deal, among other issues, with the issue of waiting times.

On the question of benchmarks, the Minister of Health has worked very hard across the country. We appointed Dr. Brian Postl to advise the Minister of Health on this particular issue and he is having a very important federal-provincial conference on that issue.

Health
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, the fact is that this so-called $41 billion solution has not worked for wait times and it has not stopped the privatization of our health care system.

The Prime Minister says that he is very concerned about this but is the reason that he will not agree to new rules and will not answer the question properly is that he knows he will go down in history as the Liberal Prime Minister who would not defend public health care in this country?

Health
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Vancouver South
B.C.

Liberal

Ujjal Dosanjh Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, that is absolute nonsense. The fact is that it was the Prime Minister who made wait times the issue. It was the Prime Minister who actually provided $41.3 billion. It was the Prime Minister who appointed Dr. Brian Postl. It is the Prime Minister who is going to see that we have benchmarks before the end of the year and that we strengthen the public health care system.

Our quarrel is not with the NDP. We share the objective with the NDP of strengthening public health care. It is those people opposite who actually have no commitment to public health care.

Health
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Health
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

The Speaker

Perhaps we could have a little less catcalling in the House. It is very difficult to hear the answers when members are continually yelling things. It would be a little more orderly if members would be quiet and listen to the questions and the answers.