House of Commons Hansard #136 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was street.

Topics

Nicholas Salamis
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Helena Guergis Simcoe—Grey, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today on behalf of my Conservative colleagues and all Greek Canadians to pay tribute to an icon of Montreal's Greek community, Father Nicholas Salamis, who passed away on Sunday at 108 years of age.

Father Salamis was born on the Greek Island of Samos in 1897. At the age of 17 he immigrated to America before settling in the Greek community in Montreal in 1919. At age 35 he decided to become an Orthodox priest and returned to Athens to study theology.

In 1938 Father Nicholas Salamis returned to Canada and spent seven years in a Toronto parish before he transferred back to his beloved Montreal.

Father Salamis became the rock of his community watching over his flock for over 40 years. I am told that Father Salamis conducted over 10,000 religious ceremonies throughout his tenure.

My executive assistant, George Sardelis, who is of Greek descent, has spoken highly of Father Salamis to me on many occasions.

The Greek community will miss him dearly. However, we will never forget his passion and commitment toward his community.

Commemoration of the Persons Case
Statements By Members

October 18th, 2005 / 2:15 p.m.

Bloc

Nicole Demers Laval, QC

Mr. Speaker, October 18 is the anniversary of the Persons case, which is a reminder that women's rights were hard won.

In 1927, Emily Murphy, Nellie McClung, Irene Parlby, Louise McKinney and Henrietta Muir Edwards asked the Supreme Court of Canada to declare that the word “person” included women. The answer was no, and they were denied access to judgeships and seats in the House of Commons and the Senate.

The case went before the British Privy Council, which ruled in their favour on October 18, 1929. The English lords determined “that the exclusion of women from all public offices is a relic of days more barbarous than ours”.

Let us pay tribute to them today for opening the first doors to gender equality.

New Democratic Party
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

James Bezan Selkirk—Interlake, MB

Mr. Speaker, when it comes to parliamentary democracy, the New Democratic Party is acting more like an old autocratic party.

When the member for Churchill stood up for her conscience and her constituents by voting to preserve the traditional definition of marriage, the NDP leader stripped her of her critic responsibilities. Then he encouraged his hand-picked candidate to defeat the hard-working MP in a nomination battle, forcing her to sit as an independent member.

The MP for Churchill is a former hospital employee, union representative and a school board trustee. She is hard working and well liked by her constituents and parliamentary colleagues. In short, she represents the populist spirit of Tommy Douglas. But that spirit has no place in today's NDP which puts slavish devotion to political correctness far ahead of mainstream Canadian values.

If people want an MP who stands up for her constituents and does what she believes is right, not just somebody who toes the party line, they have no home in today's downtown NDP.

Etobicoke Sports Hall of Fame
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Jean Augustine Etobicoke—Lakeshore, ON

Mr. Speaker, on October 20 the Etobicoke Sports Hall of Fame will be holding its 12th annual induction dinner at the historic Old Mill Inn and Spa in my riding.

I commend the board of governors, organizers and sponsors for hosting this event in recognition of the exemplary accomplishments of community members.

Congratulations to this year's inductees: W. Zeke O'Connor, Mark Osborne, Erin Woodley, Frank Bonello, Tom Watt and Louis Cauz. They have demonstrated that with determination and commitment, excellence can be achieved. They have set a remarkable example of superior sportsmanship.

In Etobicoke we are proud of our heroes. I wish them the very best in all future pursuits.

Income Trusts
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the government has tried to claim that it has support for its actions against income trusts, but here is what the Canadian Association of Retired Persons said today:

—based on the surge of e-mails, faxes, letters and telephone calls...seniors are actually enraged, frightened and panicked about potentially losing retirement savings that they count on for essentials of daily living.

Will the Prime Minister finally admit he bungled, backed down and reversed his position on income trusts?

Income Trusts
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, if the hon. member were to take a look at the file, he would find out that, first, the province of Alberta has raised the same worries, as has the Minister of Finance. He also would note that there are worries about reinvestment in terms of productivity, which is so important, and worries in terms of fairness among investment vehicles.

This government takes no lessons from that opposition in terms of seniors. As a government, we have been retiring debt and making sure that the health care system is sound for them, certainly issues that the hon. member and the opposition have not taken into account and have refused to believe.

Income Trusts
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, that is not what seniors are saying. Seniors are seeing a government full of waste and scandal, whether it is fisheries, or Indian affairs, or the Mint or Technology Partnerships. They see the same government clamping down on the retirement savings of seniors and investors.

Here is what CARP quotes seniors actually saying:

Your actions are happening at a time when retirees are facing some very major increases such as energy costs...As government, you should be trying to help the people, not hurt us.

Once again, and another chance for the Prime Minister, will he back down and reverse his ill-considered decision on income trusts?

Income Trusts
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Scarborough—Guildwood
Ontario

Liberal

John McKay Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the flow through entities referred to by the hon. member are a great concern to the government and to individual investors as well.

What has developed in the marketplace is a differentiation between the tax treatment in corporations and the tax treatment in income trusts. This is of concern to all Canadians, including the people about whom the hon. member seems to be concerned. We want to treat all Canadians in an equal fashion so they indeed can save for their retirement.

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, what the parliamentary secretary is really saying is the returns were too good, so they want to clamp down on them.

Just to draw the contrast, yesterday the government said that it would deduct any improper payments from the severance it wanted to pay the Prime Minister's friend David Dingwall. We know that David Dingwall already improperly received $350,000 from Technology Partnerships.

Will the Prime Minister assure us that he will deduct that $350,000 from any payment to David Dingwall?

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Vancouver Kingsway
B.C.

Liberal

David Emerson Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, I think the hon. member knows that the agreement with the government is with the company and we have recovered that money. Therefore, if the company chooses to go after Mr. Dingwall, that is the business of the company, not the Government of Canada. We are recovering all taxpayer money. We have done so and we will continue to do so.

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

What we know, Mr. Speaker, is that David Dingwall is not entitled to another dime of taxpayer money.

I want to ask the Prime Minister again because this was his idea. This is the man he called the Saint David of public service here on the House of Commons floor. Once again, will he assure us that he will not pay David Dingwall a cent when he already owes $350,000 back to the government?

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Markham—Unionville
Ontario

Liberal

John McCallum Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, I want to inform the House that I am always keen to get information publicly as quickly as possible. Having been led to believe that the results of the audit would be available tomorrow, I said so in question period. However, at 6 p.m. I learned that the audit results would not be available until a week from tomorrow. I immediately reported this in the House at 6:20 p.m. or so yesterday. While I regret having inadvertently given wrong information, those are the facts.

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Brian Pallister Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, like the government, the minister runs faster backwards than forward. We all know that Dingwall could not possibly have been off side because there were no lines on the ice. Section 7.5 of the Mint's travel policy says, “Exceptions to this policy will require the approval of the President”. There also are exceptions in the Mint's hospitality policy for, guess who, the president.

These rules were written after the sponsorship scandal, after Ouellet, after Radwanski and after the Prime Minister came into office. Why has he done nothing? How many Liberal red flags does the Prime Minister need?

David Dingwall
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Markham—Unionville
Ontario

Liberal

John McCallum Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, there are two points of which the hon. member should be aware. First, expenses are not approved by the president. Expenses are approved by the board of directors of the Royal Canadian Mint.

Second, as I announced yesterday, the appropriateness of those rules will itself be examined by a well known expert in corporate governance called Peter Dey. Mr. Dey will be examining the appropriateness of all those rules and making recommendations for potential improvement to the Mint.

Child Care
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday we learned from the lips of the Prime Minister himself that although child care centres come under Quebec's jurisdiction, children themselves are of national interest. According to the Prime Minister's reasoning, the federal government could therefore impose its conditions as far as child care funding is concerned, since children are of national interest.

Are we to take from this that the federal government would, in the name of national interest, override Quebec's jurisdiction over child care?