House of Commons Hansard #134 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was health.

Topics

Softwood Lumber
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Dewdney—Alouette, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals have shown British Columbians that resolving the softwood lumber crisis is not their priority. The Prime Minister talks tough, but he will not talk to President Bush.

Possibly worse than the Liberal inaction, the NDP want to go down a dangerous road by imposing export taxes on oil and gas. Only the NDP could think that fighting an import tax with an export tax makes for a sound trade policy.

Conservatives continue to stand up for the B.C. workers, companies and communities affected by the illegal softwood duties.

A Conservative government would immediately appoint a special envoy to Washington to press our case and get our money back. We would offer assistance to the companies that have been unfairly impacted by this dispute. We would demand that trade deals be honoured and dispute rulings respected.

Unlike the Liberal-NDP coalition, we do not think the answer is to run and hide or to play to anti-American sentiment. We need creative solutions and a Prime Minister more interested in public policy than public posturing.

The bottom line? We need a new Prime Minister.

Fire Prevention Week
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Larry Bagnell Yukon, YT

Mr. Speaker, October 9 to 15 marks this year's Fire Prevention Week. Throughout the week, Canadians will learn fire prevention practices and safety procedures to make our country fire safe.

This year the focus is on increasing awareness and curbing fire related injuries and fatalities caused by the negligent use of candles. The theme for Fire Prevention Week 2005 has therefore been chosen accordingly: “Use Candles with Care: When you go out, blow out”.

I hope hon. members will participate in the week by sharing fire prevention information with family, friends and neighbours. Making sure everyone knows how to use candles with care can be a matter of life and death. On average, fire kills seven people each week and injures many more.

We need to reduce these figures. Within the labour program of HRSDC, fire protection services leads the federal effort in fire prevention. The program is proud of its long-standing partnership with Fire Prevention Canada, working with it to develop educational activities for this important week.

Fire safety awareness needs to be promoted, not only during Fire Prevention Week but throughout the year. I hope all hon. members and Canadians will give their support to this important task for the benefit and safety of all Canadians.

150th Anniversary of Sainte-Sophie
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, Sainte-Sophie was founded in 1855, at the foot of the Laurentians, in what is now the riding of Rivière-du-Nord. Settled by the Scots, Irish and French Canadians, Sainte-Sophie became home to many immigrants from eastern and southern Europe in the early 20th century. A community enriched by its cultural diversity, its 10,000 inhabitants have forged exemplary ties of solidarity while respecting their origins. Plains and mountains have joined their destinies to produce a blend of generous and productive land and water bodies which are an invitation to dream.

Events took place throughout the year, culminating on October 15 with a dinner at which the book by Normand Champagne entitled Le temps que j'm'en souviens , which is a wonderful account of times gone by, will be launched. The Bloc Québécois salutes the work of the organizers, the mayor of Sainte-Sophie and the members of the municipal council to ensure the success of these events. To everyone in Sainte-Sophie, happy 150th anniversary.

Mental Illness Awareness Week
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Susan Kadis Thornhill, ON

Mr. Speaker, this year, October 3 to 10 is Mental Illness Awareness Week. This national campaign was established to raise awareness of the level of mental illness in Canada, to reduce the stigma attached to mental illness and to promote the positive effects of best practices in prevention, diagnosis and medical treatment.

The campaign theme for this year is, “FACE IT. Mental Illness concerns us all”. The impact of mental illness on family, friends and society is far reaching and cannot be overstated.

Mental health issues can address many areas, from enhancing our emotional well-being to treating and preventing severe mental illness. Depression, stress, Alzheimer's disease, anxiety disorders and schizophrenia are all examples of mental health conditions. Current statistics indicate that one in five Canadians will experience a mental illness in their lifetime.

For one week, mental illness moves to the top of the agenda. We need to do better. We need to ensure that the stigma and discrimination surrounding mental illness are dispelled and mental health conditions receive the attention they deserve within our health care system.

Great Lakes
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Gord Brown Leeds—Grenville, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Great Lakes are a precious resource. Only 1% of the water of the Great Lakes is renewed each year.

We have seen recently how easily water levels in the lakes can be unbalanced by man and nature.

Currently, eight U.S. states and two Canadian provinces are reviewing the terms of the implementing agreement for the Great Lakes Annex 2001. There are significant fears that this agreement could open the door to large scale water diversions from the Great Lakes and permit this precious resource to be classified as a commodity under NAFTA.

The issue is of serious concern to the residents of Leeds and Grenville, some of whom are visiting Ottawa today, and especially to those along the St. Lawrence River and the Thousand Islands.

The federal government must get involved to stop the harm this will cause to the Great Lakes basin.

Heroes Remember Project
Statements By Members

October 7th, 2005 / 11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Marc Godbout Ottawa—Orléans, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to announce today that the Heroes Remember project team was recently awarded a gold medal at the 2005 GTEC distinction awards and gala.

The Heroes Remember project is an online collection of video and audio conversations with Canadian veterans. It offers Canadians the opportunity to experience history through the eyes of those who lived it. With the use of streaming technology, Canadians now have access to interviews recorded with hundreds of Canadian veterans over the past 30 years.

I would like to congratulate all those involved in the Heroes Remember project, especially Veterans Affairs Canada and Canadian Heritage, whose innovation has earned such recognition, appropriately during the Year of the Veteran.

The Department of Veterans Affairs and Heritage Canada have done an excellent job.

Passports
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, it has been more than a year since the United States Department of Homeland Security announced the western hemisphere initiative. It is a simple enough proposal. It is simply going to require anybody entering the United States to have a passport. The effect of this on Canadians and Canadian economic sectors is going to be quite devastating.

Only 20% of Americans have passports. It costs a family of four about $400 U.S. to acquire passports. The people who cross over the border at my riding to come for recreational, sports and cultural activities are simply not going to put that money out. It is going to cost the economy in Canada literally billions of dollars, for instance, in the tourism and hospitality industry. Eighty per cent of the visitors to the casino in Windsor are from the United States, most of them coming over from Detroit and Michigan for day visits and overnight visits.

The Canadian tourism industry has been very strong in supporting this initiative to fight—

Passports
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Crowfoot.

World Sight Day
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Kevin Sorenson Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, next Thursday, October 13, is World Sight Day.

I think most Canadians would agree that their sight is the most important ability or sense. There are many who cannot see and, in spite of this, are still very successful.

I can only imagine what a world without sight would be like, not being able to enjoy the fall colours, witness the brilliance of a sunset on a lake, watch the mist rise above the mountains, a rainbow after a storm, or the radiant smile of an innocent child.

The entire month of October is Eye Health Month. The Canadian Association of Optometrists encourages every Canadian to think about the last time they had their eyes checked and, if it has been a while, book an appointment soon.

I join with the Canadian Association of Optometrists in encouraging all those who value their eyesight to book an eye exam. Do not miss out on all there is to see in this amazing world.

Caisse de Dépôt et Placement du Québec
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Carole Lavallée Saint-Bruno—Saint-Hubert, QC

Mr. Speaker, on July 15, 1965, the Government of Quebec passed Bill 51, which created Quebec's deposit and investment fund, the Caisse de Dépôt et Placement du Québec.

The fund has expanded over the years to become the largest institutional investor in Canada and, obviously, Quebec. It now manages net assets over $102 billion.

Maximizing the return on investment for its depositors and ensuring Quebec's economic development and international presence have remained at the heart of the fund's mission and commitments.

The fund's presence in Quebec over the past forty years has encouraged the development of several generations of financial experts and entrepreneurs, as well as giving Quebeckers more control over their own finances.

The Bloc Québécois is proud to pay tribute to the founding visionaries, developers and individuals who ensure the future of such a powerful development tool as the Quebec deposit and investment fund.

Oil and Gas Rebate
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Betty Hinton Kamloops—Thompson, BC

Mr. Speaker, the government's recent announcements on how it is going to save Canadians from the spiralling costs of gas and home heating fuel are nothing but a veiled attempt at vote buying.

It has offered nothing to reduce the GST. It will not remove the tax on tax or the 1.5% deficit tax even though we have not had a deficit in years.

A concerted move toward tax reduction would provide assistance to all Canadians across the board, not merely the 10% included in the government's plans.

As we approach this Thanksgiving, the government should give Canadians something to be thankful for, a tax break.

Madeline-Ann Aksich
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today in heartfelt sorrow at the passing of a remarkable, courageous and inspiring individual, Madeline-Ann Aksich.

Madeline was a life force who left a profound impression on all who had the great privilege of knowing her. Businesswoman, internationalist, volunteer, painter, Madeline was at once strong, thoughtful, profoundly unselfish, compassionate, cultured, humble and sincerely grateful for the smallest kindnesses shown to her.

Moved by the plight of children in the former Yugoslavia, in 1992 Madeline created the International Children's Institute. Its mission: to help children in war-torn areas cope with the upheaval and violence in their lives. In 2002, Madeline was awarded the Order of Canada.

Madeline forever reached out to others and to life itself, even in the most difficult moments of her illness. Madeline was not only a wonderful friend and warm presence. She not only made a difference in the world. She taught us how to live. She showed us the way. We are all immeasurably better for having known her.

Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Bloc

Pauline Picard Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, I want to acknowledge the decision of the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières to inaugurate a new master's level program on managing innovation in SMEs, this fall in Drummondville.

The impetus for this innovative program came from Josée Saint-Pierre, scientific director of the Centre universitaire PME, and Michel Trépanier, who are both professors, researchers and members of the university's research institute on SMEs.

The program, aimed at business and institutional professionals as well as consultants, uses a multidisciplinary approach to the innovation process and its management and, above all, to fostering the creativity needed to develop innovations.

These days, we no longer talk about innovation simply in terms of conquering new markets, we also talk about it when it comes to retaining market share and remaining competitive.

Bravo for your innovation, a first in Quebec.

Seniors
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, a nation can be judged by the smiles of its children and the care of our seniors. Unfortunately, I would like to bring a little story to the House of Commons of my constituent, Mr. Earl Shadbolt of Eastern Passage, who has informed me that the increase in his old age security works out to 3¢ a day and yet the government is prepared to give David Dingwall the equivalent of $1,370 a day.

The National Council on the Aging has said very clearly that there is a very serious threat of many seniors going into desperate poverty. What makes the government think that David Dingwall deserves $1,370 a day and Earl Shadbolt of Eastern Passage and many seniors across the country only deserve 3¢ a day?

My recommendation to the Prime Minister in his statement today is to give that surplus in terms of tax breaks and an incentive program so our seniors can take care of themselves because they are the glory of this country. They helped build this country and the Liberals should know that more than anyone else.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

Peter MacKay Central Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister's phony photo op in New York City yesterday is naturally being billed as a great success by his aides and a new policy of forceful advocacy on the softwood lumber file. It is too bad it was at a CNN studio and not at the White House.

Despite the false bravado, the Prime Minister still has not found time to phone President Bush on this important issue and advocate this tough position.

Based on recent reports, we know the Prime Minister and his cabinet have a great propensity for flying at taxpayer expense. Instead of spending thousands of dollars flying down to New York for a public relations tub thumping exercise, maybe the Prime Minister could just let his fingers do the walking and call the President.