House of Commons Hansard #149 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was animal.

Topics

Agriculture
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Liberal

Andy Mitchell Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister of State (Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario)

Mr. Speaker, in the negotiations leading up to Hong Kong, we are pursuing the objectives that we always have. We want to see a reduction in domestic supports, the elimination of export subsidies and increased market access for Canadian producers around the world. We are doing that in a way that guarantees that Canadian producers can make their own decisions about their domestic marketing regimes.

Agriculture
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

André Bellavance Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, if, as the minister claims, the mandate of the negotiating team is to maintain the supply management system, when will he walk the talk by closing the border to butter oil, milk protein products and other products that could circumvent the supply management system?

Agriculture
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Liberal

Andy Mitchell Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister of State (Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario)

Mr. Speaker, supply management has existed in this country for close to 35 years now. It was a proposal put forward by a Liberal government, a proposal that has been maintained by a Liberal government and a proposal that will be kept into the future by a Liberal government.

Access to Information
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Guy Lauzon Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry, ON

Mr. Speaker, in his annual report, the Information Commissioner gave the PCO an F, and with good reason.

Last year, partly because of the sponsorship scandal, the number of requests the office received increased by 60%, while it refused to respond to nearly 30% of them.

My question is for the Prime Minister. What is his corrupt government trying to hide and why is it refusing to provide the information requested?

Access to Information
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, absolutely nothing. The reality is that it is the Privy Council that led an unprecedented release of documents to Mr. Justice Gomery. It is the Privy Council that was absolutely forthcoming with the committee when it came to Bill C-25, giving all manner of documents.

It is the Prime Minister who led the proactive disclosure program that is putting more information on public view than ever before.

Access to Information
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Guy Lauzon Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry, ON

Mr. Speaker, the cover-up continues.

In his annual report, Privacy Commissioner John Reid gave the Liberal government an F when replying to access to information requests. Mr. Reid noted that the government flatly refused almost 30% of the 480 requests received by the government in 2004. These 480 requests represent a 60% increase, mostly due to the sponsorship scandal of course.

On behalf of the Canadian taxpayer, I would like to ask the Prime Minister once again, what is the corrupt Liberal government trying to hide?

Access to Information
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, 12 million pages of documents, many of them confidential cabinet documents, in an unprecedented move, were made available to Mr. Justice Gomery by the government under the leadership of the Prime Minister.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Nancy Karetak-Lindell Nunavut, NU

Mr. Speaker, I understand that last week the United States House of Representatives removed the plans for oil and gas drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska from its budget bill, as Canada has been pressing Congress to do for months.

Many Canadians, especially northerners, are very concerned about this issue and want assurances. Could the Minister of the Environment confirm that this is the case and update the House on the status of ANWR?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Saint-Laurent—Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, Canadians should be proud of the hard work of the Prime Minister, the hon. member for Yukon, the G'witchin people, other aboriginal people across North America in both countries, members of Congress and everyone who has worked so tirelessly on this important issue.

This is not only great news for the Caribou but also for Canada and North America, and it sends a very positive signal around the world for the cause of nature conservation.

Justice
Oral Questions

November 14th, 2005 / 2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Vic Toews Provencher, MB

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Justice wants Canadians to believe that his recent legislation will cut down on the rate of house arrest for violent criminals but his legislation says that in exceptional circumstances convicted rapists can avoid jail time.

Under what circumstances does the minister believe that criminals who rape women should get house arrest?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Mount Royal
Québec

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, when we met with all the provincial and territorial ministers of justice in Whitehorse last week they all supported and praised the proposed conditional sentencing reform. I will take their views, with respect, to that of the member opposite.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Vic Toews Provencher, MB

Mr. Speaker, the minister may support house arrest for rapists but Canadians do not.

The minister believes that the struggle for the illegal drug trade is fueling gun violence in Canada. The minister's recent bluster about cracking down on gun crime is meaningless unless he is also prepared to eliminate house arrest for those who are killing our youth with drugs.

Why is the minister willing to allow repeat drug dealers to qualify for house arrest?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Mount Royal
Québec

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I do not know why the member opposite insists on rewriting the Criminal Code, on rewriting the recommendations that are being proposed in the conditional sentence reform. Serious and violent offences will not be the subject of a conditional sentence.

Mining Industry
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Diane Bourgeois Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, instead of imposing restrictive standards in terms of social and environmental responsibilities on Canadian mining companies operating abroad, the minister would prefer to let them self-regulate. We can see the results in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Myanmar, the Philippines and Guatemala.

Does the minister realize that, with that attitude, he is giving companies the green light to do what they want, without any respect for the rights of the communities?

Mining Industry
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Papineau
Québec

Liberal

Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, our government is trying to work very closely with mining companies, which are found throughout the world. However, it is obvious that we cannot impose Canadian laws or regulations on these Canadian mining companies. That would be an issue of extraterritoriality, which we condemn in numerous other cases throughout the world.

We do hope, however, that Canadian companies, along with the Government of Canada, will develop codes of conduct and corporate responsibility through a developed social conscience. That is what the government is doing with companies throughout the world, while respecting Canadian legislation—