House of Commons Hansard #154 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was cultural.

Topics

Intergovernmental Affairs
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Westmount—Ville-Marie
Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the answer is no. The statement is unacceptable. In a democracy, a person cannot act outside the law. Indeed, the Bloc leader has remained strangely silent over the remarks by his new ally, who does not wish to obey the laws of democracy.

The Supreme Court said very clearly that a constitutional amendment is required in matters of secession and must be negotiated with clear and unequivocal support, and the Clarity Act is based on the decision of the Supreme Court.

I as a Quebecker cannot have my rights or my Canada taken away unlawfully.

Automobile Industry
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Brian Masse Windsor West, ON

Mr. Speaker, back in November 2004, the Minister of Industry promised the following to a question I posed in the House of Commons:

Over the next couple of weeks, we will be putting together the final touches on an automotive industrial strategy for all of Canada.

That was November 2004, more than one year ago. Where is our national auto policy? We are losing jobs. Where is the minister's credibility? When will he table the policy in the House?

Automobile Industry
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Vancouver Kingsway
B.C.

Liberal

David Emerson Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member might ask himself why he and his party are so anxious to go to an election two weeks from the time when I told the hon. member that I was going to cabinet with an automotive strategy.

I will say that we have invested over $400 million in the automotive sector and levered over $5 billion of investment. Just this afternoon, DaimlerChrysler will be announcing another investment of over $800 million and the Government of Canada will be investing $46 million.

Automobile Industry
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Brian Masse Windsor West, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians will not put up with this political blackmail any more.

Back in 1993, 1997, 2000 and 2004 the government promised a national auto strategy. It has not delivered and is playing politic with Canadian jobs.

Where is the minister's credibility? He has broken his promise in the House.

Automobile Industry
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Vancouver Kingsway
B.C.

Liberal

David Emerson Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member might want to explain to Buzz Hargrove, the head of the Canadian Auto Workers Union, why his party will take this Parliament to an election at a time when we are making major investments for the betterment of Canadian auto workers.

The hon. member and his party ought to explain that because they have a lot of explaining to do.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Carleton—Lanark, ON

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow the Minister of National Defence will be seeking approval from cabinet for the acquisition of 16 transport aircraft.

He claims that this is a competition. However he has fixed the requirements so there is only one possible outcome.

By declaring the budget firm and the total number of aircraft is 16, the Boeing C-17 will be eliminated. By demanding the aircraft must be certified at contract award and not delivery, they have eliminated the EADS A400M from competition.

Why is this sole source contract for the Lockheed C130J aircraft being spun as a competition when it is not?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Toronto Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Bill Graham Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member prefaced his question by saying that I will be taking it to cabinet this afternoon.

When cabinet approves it, maybe the hon. member will then be in a position to either criticize it or comment on it. However, until it has been brought out by cabinet, I respectfully request the hon. member to wait and see what the proposal is.

I can assure the hon. member and members of the House that the proposal will be a performance based requirement and it will call for tenders that will allow ample competition in the bid.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Carleton—Lanark, ON

Mr. Speaker, the minister knows that in the next two months nothing of substance will happen with respect to this project.

He also knows that a new Conservative government will move quickly to acquire airlift and yet he is rushing to get cabinet approval of this, hoping something will change the airlift situation dramatically. It will not.

The only practical reason that this project is being pushed before the election is that the military want the Liberal government's signature on a document so it cannot back out of the commitment.

The minister recently said that large procurement should be held off until after the election. What has changed? Are we seeing more Liberal electioneering?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Toronto Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Bill Graham Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member is right about something. The military of this country does want its government's signature on something that will enable it to get the equipment it needs to do its job.

I ask the hon. members opposite why they are standing in the way and trying to stop, for political reasons, our ability to deliver to our military what it needs to do its job for its country, not for politics.

Child Care
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Edmonton—Spruce Grove, AB

Mr. Speaker, the national Fund the Child Coalition is made up of an alliance of grassroots organizations that held rallies in 17 cities across Canada this weekend. The coalition represents the millions of families who feel excluded by the Liberal day care plan. They are concerned that this plan has been pushed through without a debate.

Today this coalition of women from across Canada is here in Ottawa and is challenging the minister to hold a nationally televised debate on child care. Will the minister agree?

Child Care
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Ken Dryden Minister of Social Development

Mr. Speaker, the member opposite should know that in terms of benefits for stay at home parents, the Canadian child tax benefit and the spousal tax benefit, on average, mean more than $2,000 a year for stay at home parents. Parental leaves and maternity benefits are 50 weeks. For the average family this means more than $15,000. The cost to the government is over $2 billion a year, and that is only for stay at home parents.

As well as that, we want to do is support parents who want their children in good quality developmental child care.

Child Care
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Edmonton—Spruce Grove, AB

Mr. Speaker, I will let the women know that he would be happy to debate them.

Women from the national Fund the Child Coalition are in Ottawa today to ask this government for choice in child care. These women receive no funding and are solely motivated by their belief in equality and choice. They say that the Liberal one size fits all day care plan discriminates against millions of Canadian families. They are asking for a progressive, flexible plan which sees funding go straight to the child.

When will the minister acknowledge the voices of women from across the country and offer them choice in child care?

Child Care
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Ken Dryden Minister of Social Development

Mr. Speaker, I wonder why the party opposite has chosen to pit one style of family life against another? The great majority of parents, even with young children, are both in the workplace, and that is a fact. Is the member suggesting that this great majority of parents who have their children in child care are wrong? Are they self-indulgent, are they selfish or are they just plain stupid?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

November 21st, 2005 / 2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Jim Prentice Calgary North Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal government has long spoken of a historic meeting in Kelowna. The department is saying it works in collaboration with the native peoples. What collaboration? The native peoples of Quebec do not even want to participate. Why? Because after the dozen years it took to prepare this meeting, the Liberal agenda remains unclear. What a surprise. The Liberal agenda is never clear.

How will the Prime Minister resolve the problems of Canadian native peoples without having all first nations at the table?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

London West
Ontario

Liberal

Sue Barnes Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, no one should prejudge the outcome of a meeting. The meeting that will take place is an historic one. The Government of Canada has acknowledged that the living conditions on many reserves are unacceptable. That is why we have been working for two years with many organizations and the leadership to get to this historic conference this week. They will have the plans that will affect the lives of Canadians.

May I remind the members opposite, when Canadians look to a government, they look for a vision. The do not look for negative comments all the time.