House of Commons Hansard #154 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was property.

Topics

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Lynne Yelich Blackstrap, SK

Mr. Speaker, last Thursday the Minister responsible for Status of Women claimed that her government provided $12 million to a domestic violence prevention initiative run by the Native Women's Association of Canada. This is not true.

The only funding given to the Native Women's Association is $5 million spread over five years. Oddly enough, that funding did not start until last Thursday, over half a year after it was promised.

The minister's own department has confirmed in writing that no further funding has gone to the organization. There was no additional $7 million given from her department. Why did the minister say that there was?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Jeanne-Le Ber
Québec

Liberal

Liza Frulla Minister of Canadian Heritage and Minister responsible for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, if the hon. member understood French, she would have understood that I said that $5 million has already been given to Sisters in Spirit. In addition, Status of Women Canada has a $7 million program to prevent violence against women. Some money from this program is used to address violence against women, including those in native communities.

There is therefore some $12 million for the entire violence prevention program. In addition, a federal-provincial conference is at risk because—

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot.

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, in 2001, the government did something never before done in the history of Canada. Rather than repay what it owed school boards, in accordance with a ruling by the courts, it preferred to make a retroactive amendment to the Excise Tax Act.

If the Minister of Finance does not want education to suffer, why is he not repaying the school boards the full amount of their GST overpayments, instead of making retroactive changes to legislation in complete disregard for rulings by the courts and his own commitments?

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the government assists education across the country in a variety of ways, some of it through the direct transfer system between levels of government and some through tax rebates. In the case of the elementary and secondary school system, a rebate is in place. It is not the full 100% that applies to municipalities, but it is at a very generous level. I believe the number is 68%.

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Yvan Loubier Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, here is another example: the government is full of noble statements about education, but it does not hesitate to tax books. A tax on books is a tax on literacy, as they say.

Will the Minister of Finance agree that, if education were truly important to him, he would abolish the GST on books, as Quebec did with the QST?

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the government tries to maintain consumption taxes at the lowest possible level. That involves having a tax base that is fairly broad to ensure that the rate can be as low as it can be. On the other hand, there are exemptions and exceptions. Exceptions are made in the case of certain materials that are used with respect to education.

International Trade
Oral Questions

November 21st, 2005 / 2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, today's global marketplace is evolving at a swift pace and presenting new and exciting opportunities. Other nations are seizing these opportunities. Canada needs to do the same and it needs to do it better than its competitors.

How does the government's emergence market strategy address the needs of the business community, in particular our small and medium size enterprises?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Willowdale
Ontario

Liberal

Jim Peterson Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for her interest in helping SMEs.

In the economic update the finance minister made an unprecedented investment in helping small and medium sized enterprises cope with this rapidly changing global economy. In particular, we are going to put a lot more trade commissioners on the ground to help our SMEs in markets such as India and China and we are going to partner upfront with small and medium sized enterprises to help them defer the added cost of going overseas. We are there with them.

Agriculture
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

David Anderson Cypress Hills—Grasslands, SK

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal culture of entitlement is alive and well as the government goes about treating public institutions as its own private assets. For six weeks, we have demanded that the government raise the Canadian Wheat Board initial prices for western farmers. The government will not give farmers their own money because it is too busy spreading it out to its friends.

Farmers have been paying for David Herle, the king of untendered contracts and the Prime Minister's campaign manager, to attend Canadian Wheat Board meetings. Farmers are going broke while the Prime Minister's friends belly up to the trough. Why is the Prime Minister making things so hard for farmers but so easy for his friends?

Agriculture
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Liberal

Reg Alcock President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has done more than most for farmers in the 24 months that he has been Prime Minister. Not only that, the Wheat Board, which the member would know if he spent any time paying attention to it, is a completely independent organization run by farmers who make all these choices. It is because of the hard work of those farmers that he will get some very good news shortly.

Equalization
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Andrew Scheer Regina—Qu'Appelle, SK

Mr. Speaker, in a moment the finance minister will get up and recite a litany of band-aid fixes for Saskatchewan, but do not be fooled. These fixes were all for errors his own department made in the first place. They all do not even come close to what a substantial and fair equalization agreement would amount to. Everyone in Saskatchewan knows we are not getting a fair deal. He is not fooling anyone.

Why should people in Saskatchewan see our oil and gas revenues clawed back when other provinces do not?

Equalization
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the hon. gentleman is plainly, flatly false in his preamble. He says that the $799 million that has flowed to Saskatchewan over the last 18 months is just in respect of previous anomalies in the formula. That is not true. The amount of $126 million relates to previous anomalies, but $672 million represent an increased amount. The hon. gentleman is simply wrong.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Claude Bachand Saint-Jean, QC

Mr. Speaker, although everything was on hold last week, since the country is on the verge of an election, today we learn that the federal government is preparing to spend nearly $5 billion to purchase tactical aircraft.

Since over 50% of the aeronautics industry is concentrated in Quebec, Quebec companies in this sector are very keen to get a share of this huge contract.

Can the Minister of National Defence guarantee that no contracts will be awarded to the builders of such tactical aircraft unless they contain a Canadian content clause?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Toronto Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Bill Graham Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, all the members of the House want our Canadian forces to get the equipment they need and to do the work we—in other words, Canadians—are asking them to do.

Our aim in procurement is to optimize Canadian industry. We are working with the Canadian industry on all procurements in order to guarantee participation in the growth of that industry. However, we must, first and foremost, buy what is needed.