House of Commons Hansard #154 of the 38th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was cultural.

Topics

Federal-Provincial Relations
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Westmount—Ville-Marie
Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the leader of the Conservative Party will immediately tell us whether he supports the statement by the new leader of the Parti Québécois, who does not respect the rule of law in this country. In a democracy, we must follow the rule of law and the decisions of the Supreme Court. Is the leader of the Conservative Party telling us that he agrees with unilateral secession? If so, he will pay the price with the voters.

Government Policies
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, what I know is that a party that broke every single law in Quebec has no credibility saying it will enforce the law.

On another subject, the Prime Minister is going around the country saying that if there is an election, he will take away increases to seniors pensions, he will take away pay raises for our armed forces and public servants, and he will take away infrastructure money for cities.

Will the Prime Minister simply admit that Parliament has already passed legislation on these matters and people will get these benefits whether the Liberal Party wants them to have them or not?

Government Policies
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Hamilton East—Stoney Creek
Ontario

Liberal

Tony Valeri Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, first, what is absolutely clear is that the opposition party is causing a premature election.

Second, the opposition is causing a premature election in the face of Canadians. Two-thirds of Canadians have in fact said that they would prefer a spring election.

Third, it is the opposition parties that are leaving important work left undone in this Parliament. This is work that Canadians want to see continued. The opposition will have to take 100% of that responsibility.

Seniors
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Monte Solberg Medicine Hat, AB

Mr. Speaker, we all understand why the Liberals are afraid of an election. Justice Gomery was so right. Canadians cannot trust what the Liberals are saying.

The Prime Minister is telling Canadians that if we were to have an election now, seniors would not get their GIS increase. The Prime Minister knows better. The GIS increase was part of the first of his three budgets in the last eight months. That budget passed long ago. The Prime Minister knows that nothing can stop it from being paid out on schedule.

Either the Prime Minister has sunk to the point where he is trying to scare seniors into voting for him or he would cancel their GIS increase if re-elected. Which is it?

Seniors
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Trinity—Spadina
Ontario

Liberal

Tony Ianno Minister of State (Families and Caregivers)

Mr. Speaker, unlike the opposite party, this party and this government truly believes in seniors and what they have done for us.

With the increase in the guaranteed income supplement, after nine years of Conservative rule, we will see an increase for our low income seniors of $433 when fully implemented. The heating rebate that will not be passed by this Parliament right now if it things go as planned is for the most vulnerable in our society to receiver $125 starting in January or February. So there is a lot more that we are doing for---

Seniors
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Medicine Hat.

Government Policies
Oral Questions

November 21st, 2005 / 2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Monte Solberg Medicine Hat, AB

Mr. Speaker, 12 years of inaction speaks more loudly than the protests from that member.

Justice Gomery was completely right. We just cannot trust what they are saying over there. The Liberals will say anything to stay in power. They are saying that people will not get their heating rebate.

Liberals members know that in the 2001 election the government was unable to get its heating rebate legislation passed, so it used special warrants to get these rebates through.

Is the government saying to low income Canadians that it will refuse to use special warrants to pass the heating rebate legislation that Canadians need this winter?

Government Policies
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Trinity—Spadina
Ontario

Liberal

Tony Ianno Minister of State (Families and Caregivers)

Mr. Speaker, that party voted against the budget that gave the seniors the increase. That party voted against the budget that voted for a seniors secretariat, for an increase in new horizons, for rent supplements in housing, and for affordable housing for our low income seniors.

This government talks the talk and actually walks the walk to ensure that our low income seniors and the most vulnerable in our society receive all that is due to them after all they have done to build this great country.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois recently met with representatives of the Quebec softwood lumber industry. They are united in calling for loan guarantees to help them get through this interminable crisis.

Since implementing such an aid measure does not require passing legislation, the Prime Minister can act immediately, election or not.

Will the Prime Minister finally put his money where his mouth is and grant the loan guarantees the softwood lumber industry so desperately needs?

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Brossard—La Prairie
Québec

Liberal

Jacques Saada Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec and Minister responsible for the Francophonie

Mr. Speaker, as far as I am concerned, that party has no credibility when it comes to regional development.

Voting against a bill that would have enabled us to intervene does nothing for their credibility. Voting against a budget that would have protected regional development—as that party did—does nothing for their credibility.

We are working diligently and intelligently on this highly complex issue with the full intention of helping our people, but not with the grandstanding approach the Bloc members would like.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier, QC

Mr. Speaker, everyone knows how much credibility the Liberals have in Quebec.

That said, if the Liberals want a little more credibility, perhaps the minister could start by answering the questions.

I am asking him about loan guarantees for the softwood lumber industry. All the companies are asking for that. I met with representatives from the major companies on Friday. They are asking for the same thing the Bloc has been for years. The unions are asking for the same thing.

Could the minister give a clear answer, without grandstanding, to this one very specific question only: will they grant loan guarantees this week? The question is clear.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Markham—Unionville
Ontario

Liberal

John McCallum Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, the loan guarantee idea did not come from the Bloc. It has been on the back burner for months and months and it is an option the government is considering.

It is a very big problem. We have consulted the industry, the associations and Liberal MPs. No Bloc MP has approached me. I think this is petty politics.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Marc Boulianne Mégantic—L'Érable, QC

Mr. Speaker, the federal government had promised $20 million to the forestry associations to cover legal fees incurred defending their position in the softwood lumber crisis. The associations are in need of a commitment if they are to convince their bankers of the government's intentions.

Could the government make a commitment today to write a letter immediately to the forestry associations confirming its intention to provide this assistance?

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Willowdale
Ontario

Liberal

Jim Peterson Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, we have, of course, promised $20 million to the forestry industries to help them meet their legal fees, and we will keep that promise.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Marc Boulianne Mégantic—L'Érable, QC

Mr. Speaker, the forestry industry has been left to its own devices since the conflict began. Already, $400 million in legal fees have been expended by the industry's companies and associations in order to gain recognition of their rights.

Does the government not feel it is necessary to assume immediate responsibility for those costs?