House of Commons Hansard #91 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was industry.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, in fact we are working with the large final emitters right now to look at regulations, so I look forward to working with the committee.

I would suggest to the hon. member that he recognize there are things in Bill C-30 that we would like to also protect, things like making sure that we address air pollution. Right now the bill that is in front of the House from the Liberals and from the NDP does nothing to address air pollution in particular. It also does not address indoor air pollution, which is a real issue in terms of the health of Canadians. I would ask him to do the same thing and work with the government to make sure that those issues are addressed and protected in Bill C-30.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

John Godfrey Don Valley West, ON

Mr. Speaker, the notice of intent to regulate is another key aspect of the minister's plan. That is where the biggest part of the legislative battle against global warming comes into play.

Will the minister give the committee the latitude to rewrite the notice of intent to regulate, and does she promise to implement the measures recommended by this committee?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I would also ask the hon. member to recognize in Bill C-30 the elements that are necessary to have a biofuels industry. If Bill C-30, Canada's clean air act, does not pass, we will not have the regulatory authority to blend fuels to have a biofuels industry.

I would encourage him to recognize the things that are presently in the bill and to make sure he protects those so that we can have a better environment and also a better economy.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Karen Redman Kitchener Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, at last week's convention, the Liberal Party unanimously reaffirmed its commitment to the Kyoto protocol and the fight against global warming.

In contrast, the Conservative government has slashed programs, abandoned targets and embarrassed Canada on the international stage.

Will the government ever stop attacking the Kyoto protocol, stop ruining Canada's international reputation and finally start fighting global warming?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I will just read what the Leader of the Opposition himself told a reporter from the Globe and Mail. He said, “...he seemed to suggest that, whereas France had to do nothing to meet its Kyoto targets, Canada's were unattainable”. He also added, for good measure, that Jean Chrétien had only proposed these stringent targets to trump the Americans.

That is not good policy. We need to move past this debate. Everyone knows that the present target was put in place by the Liberals in a political manner. We need new targets and a new Kyoto framework. I encourage the members to stop fighting and work with the government.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Karen Redman Kitchener Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians get nothing but empty words from the government when it comes to the environment.

Global warming is an international problem that requires an international solution but the Conservatives have retreated from our international responsibilities and have produced the most embarrassingly inadequate piece of legislation this country has ever seen.

When will the government stop hiding under the bed and join with the rest of the world in its fight against global warming?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, those are empty words. This is after 13 years and our emissions are up by 35%. The environment commissioner said this about the last government's record:

On the whole, the government's response to climate change is not a good story. At a government-wide level, our audits revealed inadequate leadership, planning, and performance.

It has not been effective in leading and deciding on many of the key areas under its control. Change is needed.

Change has arrived and I again encourage the opposition to get past the rhetoric and fighting and work with the government to reduce emissions.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Edmonton Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Memorial Cross, more often referred to as the Silver Cross, is awarded to mothers and widows of deceased Canadian Forces members who die on active duty.

Over the past several years, members of the House have led the charge for changes to modernize the Memorial Cross medal.

Could the Minister of National Defence please advise the House as to the status of the Memorial Cross medal?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills
Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to announce that the rules governing the Memorial Cross have been revised to reflect the personal wishes of each individual member of the Canadian Forces.

As of January 1, 2007, each Canadian Forces member will designate up to three recipients who will be awarded the medal in the event of their death in the service of Canada.

I would like to personally thank the Minister of Veterans Affairs for his help and that of his department in achieving these significant changes. I am very pleased that Canada's new government has found an innovative way to better serve the brave men and women of the Canadian Forces.

Human Resources and Social Development
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Peggy Nash Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, across Canada we are seeing the impact of low wages and inadequate benefits. There is a growing gap between the rich and the poor.

I know families in Toronto where people are working two jobs, 40 hours a week, 52 weeks a year and still need to choose between food on the table and paying the rent.

The Liberals abolished the federal minimum wage 10 years ago. Will the minister make an immediate difference by reinstating the federal minimum wage and by setting it at $10 an hour?

Human Resources and Social Development
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, we all know that unfortunately there are those in our society who do not make enough money to provide themselves with a healthy and safe living, which is why the Minister of Finance in his 2006 budget took so many steps to help both the poor and the working poor, including his workers' incentive tax benefit, including lowering taxes for all Canadians and including taking over 600,000 people completely off the federal tax rolls.

Human Resources and Social Development
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Peggy Nash Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government's failure is visible on every street in Canada. Canada is in desperate need of a real urban agenda that places the needs of Canadian families beyond unnecessary cuts in services, especially for new Canadians, women and the working poor.

Under the Liberals, the richest 10% saw their incomes grow by 14%, while the poorest of the poor saw virtually no increase and the income of many working families actually declined.

Will the minister take a bite out of poverty and introduce a $10 federal minimum wage?

Human Resources and Social Development
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member raises an important issue about the fact that many Canadians who want to work or who do go to work and receive social benefits are discouraged by the welfare wall from pursuing gainful employment.

We will fix that in “Advantage Canada”, our economic plan for Canada which was released about 10 days ago. We describe the worker's income tax benefit. The acronym is WITB, which will help the members opposite to remember it. We will introduce that in budget 2007. It will help Canadians get over that welfare wall.

RCMP Commissioner
Oral Questions

December 5th, 2006 / 2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Mount Royal, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister said that the government wishes to consider due process with respect to Commissioner Zaccardelli. Does this mean that the government has decided to ask for the resignation of Commissioner Zaccardelli and is now proceeding in accordance with appropriate procedures in that regard?

RCMP Commissioner
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, as we indicated yesterday, there was the issue in a speech that the commissioner gave related to a contradiction. Today that matter was addressed rather vigorously and appropriately so by the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security. Now we are in the process, a couple of hours later, of reviewing the whole matter. We will do that in a professional way.