House of Commons Hansard #12 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was international.

Topics

Health
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Tina Keeper Churchill, MB

Mr. Speaker, the parliamentary secretary for health is not aware that the chief was in Ottawa this week and had tried to meet with officials and representatives from government. They have not been able to access those responsible. This community has not been able to implement a crisis response. Screening of all individuals is necessary to contain the outbreak.

In the midst of a public health crisis, why does the government not provide the first nation with the same level of service that any other Canadian would receive?

Health
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia
Manitoba

Conservative

Steven Fletcher Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, it is clear that the member is not aware of the meeting that the chief had with the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development yesterday, not to mention the meetings that they had previously.

Having said that, it is clear that aboriginal communities all across Canada are having challenges and that is due to 13 years of Liberal neglect of these first nations. We look forward to treating all Canadians equally and ensuring access to first class health care.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Gary Merasty Desnethé—Missinippi—Churchill River, SK

Mr. Speaker, imposing legislation upon aboriginal governments without prior consultation does not work, not to mention that it is an insult. Aboriginal organizations, the federal Auditor General, and the previous government had established a round table joint policy initiative to build capacity toward the establishment of a first nation's auditor general.

Why is the government imposing its colonial wards of state attitude upon the first nations and not respecting this agreed to initiative?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to inform the member opposite that before the decision was taken to include first nations in our federal accountability act, I had the opportunity to sit down and talk to Chief Fontaine. He asked for a meeting and one was granted within 24 hours.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Gary Merasty Desnethé—Missinippi—Churchill River, SK

Mr. Speaker, instead of a round table, we get more of a bully pulpit. Each first nation government already files a minimum of 168 financial reports every year to the federal government, all of which the Auditor General gets access to.

The parliamentary Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development stated that 96% of first nations are fully compliant with all the regulations and rules. When will the government get off the pulpit, get back to the table, and begin consulting with first nations people?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, the government did not want to establish a two tier process for the Auditor General. We believe that the Auditor General has been a real hero to the Canadian taxpayer and all Canadians. We want to give her the discretionary power to follow the money. I think all Canadians, including aboriginal Canadians, will welcome this initiative.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Dick Harris Cariboo—Prince George, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the government signed a historic deal with the U.S. that ended several years of softwood dispute that plagued our industry. While the previous Liberal Prime Minister and the previous government were on record as being willing to settle for just $3.5 billion of the $5 billion in illegal penalties, it appears that the government did far better than that.

Could the Minister of Industry please tell the House the details of the return of the illegal penalties that were collected by the U.S.?

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, it is interesting that my colleague notes that the previous Prime Minister, the member for LaSalle--Émard, was prepared to settle for far less. In fact, I have a quote from the member for LaSalle--Émard, from November 17 of last year. He said, “The Americans owe Canadian companies $3.5 billion”.

It is a good thing he is not Prime Minister today because otherwise Canadians would have been shortchanged. Based on the deal arrived at by this Prime Minister yesterday, $4 billion will come back to the pockets of Canadians. To be clear, I am not sure if I get an A in my math, but that is $500 million more than that party was prepared to settle for.

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

April 28th, 2006 / 11:45 a.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, let us talk about an important issue in my constituency in the north.

Today the Mackenzie gas pipeline is in front of two federal assessment panels. The Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development met with leaders from the Northwest Territories last week and indicated that his government was willing to support this project without the unanimous approval of northern aboriginal leaders and the results of the two assessment panels.

How can the minister take such a stand before the assessments have been completed and aboriginal leaders have had their input?

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Conservative

Rod Bruinooge Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada and the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development are very interested in providing economic development to the north. Clearly, we are interested in receiving unanimity, if possible, but we are not going to let that be a barrier to providing economic value to the northerners that need it the most.

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, there is so much the minister can do for our communities, for the working families, and for aboriginal people. We need to work with all people to prepare the ground for such an important project.

The minister needs to take immediate action to deal with the Deh Cho land claims, financing the protected areas strategy, supporting land use plans, negotiating resource revenue sharing, and establishing a cumulative environmental impact assessment process.

Will the minister commit to work with the people of the north on these issues immediately?

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Conservative

Rod Bruinooge Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development has committed to the people of the north including the Deh Cho. In fact, his first trip was throughout the north. He met with these groups and he has ensured all parties that he is going to be working with all stakeholders to provide the best solution to this situation.

Child Care
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives' supposed child care plan will neither create new child care spaces nor set up early learning programs on first nations reserves. Canada's aboriginal population is growing rapidly and urgently needs new child care spaces on reserves. Why are the minister and his government neglecting aboriginal Canadians?

Child Care
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Winnipeg South
Manitoba

Conservative

Rod Bruinooge Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada is interested in helping all children all across Canada. That is the great thing about our choice in child care policy. It is going to benefit all Canadians, including aboriginal Canadians, and we are very proud of that fact.

Child Care
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, that is a vague and incorrect answer. The Liberal government had set aside $100 million to improve early learning programs and child care on reserves.

Since the Conservative government has no plan, will it honour the Liberal commitment and give aboriginal Canadians the services they need?