House of Commons Hansard #39 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was health.

Topics

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government cannot just sit here and wash its hands of this situation. This is a dispute that goes back decades regarding treaties that involve the Crown.

The fact is that the responsibility is not being taken. The government appointed a fact finder three months ago and we have not heard a word. The first nations and the non-aboriginal people in the Caledonia area are waiting to hear the results.

Will the Prime Minister take his responsibility seriously and take some leadership here, and get involved and settle this decade old dispute or not?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member is seriously out of date on the facts that he brings to the House.

I am pleased to advise the House that we are encouraged by the steps taken by Six Nations today, particularly Chief McNaughton and the clan mothers. As the Prime Minister said, we are also supportive of the steps taken by the province of Ontario.

Six Nations has today taken steps to remove the remaining barricades near Caledonia, including the rail line. This goes a long way to removing a huge source of tension in the community and to build trust. We are encouraged. We continue to look forward to making progress. We are hopeful of what lies ahead in the coming days.

National Defence
Oral Questions

June 13th, 2006 / 2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Ujjal Dosanjh Vancouver South, BC

Mr. Speaker, there is a very serious shortage of tactical airlift for our troops in theatre. This is a concern recognized by the previous Liberal government and repeatedly expressed by the Chief of the Defence Staff, General Rick Hillier.

Would the Minister of National Defence listen to our troops and pursue the tactical airlift as his first priority for purchase?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills
Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, no decision has been made yet by the government on equipment. However, Canadians may recall that in our election campaign we said that tactical and strategic lift was a high priority.

This is unlike the previous government that prosecuted three projects in 13 years. That is the Liberal government record.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Ujjal Dosanjh Vancouver South, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of National Defence knows what procurement was obtained during the 13 years. He is absolutely wrong. He should know the truth as a lobbyist.

Based on military advice, the previous government announced last November the acquisition of tactical airlift under a competitive process with maintenance to be done in Canada.

Why did the minister play politics by cancelling that decision?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills
Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I think the member opposite hit the key word “announced”. That is all Liberals ever did: announce and announce. The Liberals never produced.

We are going to deliver this year more equipment for the Canadian Forces than the Liberals can ever imagine.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Denis Coderre Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, the entire Canadian Forces air fleet benefits from a maintenance program carried out by Canada's aeronautics industry.

The Conservatives' new communications strategy for the C-17s is now to make us believe that Canadians will be responsible for level one maintenance. That means changing the oil, refuelling and checking the planes' wiper fluid.

Will the Prime Minister finally show some respect for the excellent work done by some 75,000 Canadian workers and guarantee them full responsibility for maintaining these planes?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills
Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, no decisions have been made on equipment. When they are made, they will be in the interests of the military, Canadians and industry. They will all come with industrial benefits. There will be a great improvement in the industrial situation in Canada.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Denis Coderre Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, I have a box of chocolates here for the member who likes to quote Forrest Gump and treat everyone like Forrest Gump.

This is so he can get a life because life is like a box of chocolates. I have one for him here.

Mr. Speaker,--

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Order, please. I know the hon. member for Bourassa is trying to be very sweet, but we do not allow props in the House.

The member is an experienced member and is well aware that bandying about boxes of sweets is very nice for the minister, but he will want to put his question at once and never mind the chocolates.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Denis Coderre Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am sweet enough all right, but I offer it anyway.

When the current Conservative turncoat Minister of International Trade was Minister of Industry, he put forward the national aerospace and defence strategic framework, in which he himself recognized the importance of this sector to security and the economy.

Does he still feel the same way today, that maintenance must stay in Canada?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills
Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, as I said before, no decision has been made on any equipment. Maintenance will be done where it is appropriate in Canada.

I was not thinking about the box of chocolates. I was thinking about the other one when I talked about Forrest Gump.

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Bloc

Paul Crête Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup, QC

Mr. Speaker, on April 11, the Prime Minister said in this House, and I quote: “If there is no solution, the Minister of Industry intends to propose loan guarantees and help to the industry”. Two months have passed since then, and the softwood lumber dispute has not yet been resolved.

Given that it will be some time before a final agreement is reached and some of the money is recovered, why is the government still refusing to grant loan guarantees to the companies that need them so badly?

Softwood Lumber
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Colin Carrie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, we are not talking about guaranteeing loans, we want to guarantee an entire industry. If we look back at the Liberal legacy in softwood lumber, we have closed mills, tens of thousands of jobs either lost or in jeopardy, and tens of thousands of families without security.

The minister and the government have put forward security for these families, security for moving forward, and when the time comes, we hope the Bloc will be supportive of our position.