House of Commons Hansard #44 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was information.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

John Godfrey Don Valley West, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government is turning federal websites into Conservative Party propaganda, thanks to the NDP. The Conservatives are now banning the use of certain words on these sites.

Natural Resources Canada has not only erased all references to Kyoto from its website, it has also entirely eliminated natural resources climate change sites. Environment Canada's only surviving reference to Kyoto links to a site that has not been updated in over a year.

Why did the Minister of the Environment give the order to censor the word “Kyoto” from current Government of Canada websites?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, that is ridiculous. I have done no such thing. The Environment Canada website is a very dynamic website full of all kinds of excellent information provided by our department.

No website has ever been turned off. No links to international sites have been taken down. One can still access the Kyoto accord site through the department website. This is ridiculous.

This government has absolutely nothing to bury and nothing to hide. The only thing we are doing is making sure that we have an environmental record that we can be proud of.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

John Godfrey Don Valley West, ON

Mr. Speaker, the question is quite simple: who gave the order to remove the word Kyoto from the Government of Canada's current Internet sites? Which one of these ministers made this decision?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, maybe we will talk about something substantive instead.

For 13 years the Liberals focused on rhetoric instead of substance--

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Order, please. The hon. Minister of the Environment has the floor. The member for Don Valley West in particular will want to hear the answer.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Edmonton—Spruce Grove, AB

Mr. Speaker, what I would like to talk about is what is important to Canadians, and that is the health of Canadians in regard to our environment. For 13 years the Liberals focused on voluntary action and were afraid to regulate, afraid to ban and afraid to create new pollution laws.

In just four months we have created two new pollution laws, and just this week, the health minister and I acted and Canada has become the first country in the world to ban a known toxin that causes cancer in Canadians. That is action to protect the health of Canadians.

Program for Older Worker Adjustment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Bloc

Yves Lessard Chambly—Borduas, QC

Mr. Speaker, at the request of the Bloc Québécois, the government agreed to include POWA in the throne speech. Again at the request of the Bloc Québécois, the government mentioned it in its budget. We forwarded our cost studies to the Minister of Finance, at his request. We also forwarded our research on this subject to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development. In brief, the Bloc Québécois has done everything it can to help the government put a POWA in place.

What is the government waiting for to take action?

Program for Older Worker Adjustment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Blackstrap
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Lynne Yelich Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, as the member knows since he is on the committee, we are studying employability. I welcome all of the suggestions he has to help us with the older workers program.

Program for Older Worker Adjustment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Yves Lessard Chambly—Borduas, QC

Mr. Speaker, Magog, Huntingdon, Montmagny, the Gaspé, Saguenay and Quebec City are all cities and regions experiencing the serious problem of layoffs of older workers and calling for the establishment of an assistance program for older workers. There are individuals and families whose last vestige of hope is fading with the government's inaction.

When will the government show that it is sympathetic to the plight of older workers who have lost their jobs? This session of Parliament is coming to a close and so time is of the essence.

Program for Older Worker Adjustment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Blackstrap
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Lynne Yelich Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, as I said, we are in fact going to be studying employability this summer. We have a feasibility study right now. It was marked in the budget and I welcome any suggestions the member has for our programs.

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

June 20th, 2006 / 2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Serge Ménard Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, QC

Mr. Speaker, the reform proposed yesterday by the Minister of Public Safety with regard to the firearms registry reinstates the requirement that firearms retailers keep a record of the weapons they sell.

Does requiring a retailer to keep a record of the firearms he sells not send the message that it is important to register firearms? Does the minister plan to clearly set out this requirement in the act?

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, some things are important. It is important to reduce the number of crimes committed using a firearm. That is exactly what the Conservative Party will do. It is also important for the men, women and companies that sell firearms to keep their records up to date. In my opinion, this is important, and I would like to know whether the hon. member agrees.

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Serge Ménard Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, QC

Mr. Speaker, if the minister is not answering the question, it is probably because he does not know what to answer.

Here is another question: does the minister not realize that with the abolition of the firearms registry as we know it and its replacement by a multitude of smaller registries kept by firearms retailers, it will be possible to monitor the purchase of new weapons but nearly impossible for police to monitor subsequent resales of these weapons?

Does the minister realize that he is making life easier for street gang members than hunters?

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, the Auditor General said that there is currently no control over the long-gun registry.

I wish to say to the hon. member that it is important to remind people who want to own a firearm that they must have a licence.

If the member has concerns about this issue, why is he opposed to mandatory minimum sentences for people who commit crimes using firearms? Why is he opposed?