House of Commons Hansard #170 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was amendments.

Topics

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, the minister absolutely misrepresents the motion. The motion simply instructs the government to negotiate from a position of strength, a bottom line where the nation stands with our supply management sector.

Is the Prime Minister, by withdrawing the negotiator from sensitive industry discussions, ensuring the death of supply management? Is that his purpose? The government not only is trading our supply management system away, it is losing it by default.

Will the minister accept his responsibilities, support our producers, use the motion as leverage and get the job done?

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon
B.C.

Conservative

Chuck Strahl Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, when dairy producers asked the Liberal government to use article XXVIII to protect the industry, what happened? Not a thing. This government moved and used article XXVIII.

They asked the Liberals to move on compositional standards to protect them from the intrusion of MPCs into this country. What did that member and the rest of those guys do? Not a darn thing.

What we have done is we have said we are going to protect supply management. We stand with supply management. When we negotiate, what would the member have us do, sell out supply management? What we do is we stand solidly with the producers and we say no change to over-quota tariffs, no tariff rate expansion. We are with supply management.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Jean-Claude D'Amours Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, since the Conservatives have been in power, they have not been walking the talk, and we saw proof of this again today. The Conservatives and the Minister of International Trade are destroying an industry that does not need subsidies, but rather unwavering support to remain competitive.

When will the Minister of International Trade listen to the needs of our poultry producers and reverse his decision to allow for increased imports of poultry from outside Canada? When will the minister firmly support supply management, once and for all?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon
B.C.

Conservative

Chuck Strahl Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, I have been asked this time to kind of repeat what I said last time but maybe not so quickly. I think the hon. member should listen up.

We support supply management. We campaigned to support supply management. We have instructed our negotiators to support supply management. We intend to continue to support supply management. Read my lips. They are safe. They are with us, not with you.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Jean-Claude D'Amours Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, clearly the minister has changed portfolios, because the question was addressed to the Minister of International Trade.

While Canadian poultry producers, including those in Madawaska—Restigouche, provide a high quality product under supply management, the Minister of International Trade, without any reason, decided to allow an additional 8.7 million kilograms of chicken to be imported from other countries.

How can this government claim to defend supply management and poultry producers when it is jeopardizing the very future of our producers, not to mention jobs that are very important to rural communities in Canada?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Secretary of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, it is very strange to hear members of that party say such things. Let us consider what has been accomplished in the last 14 months. Concrete action has been taken. We are talking about action here, and not just empty rhetoric. That is all we heard for the past 13 years, and our supply managed sectors suffered as a result. We, on the other hand, are taking action.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Maria Mourani Ahuntsic, QC

Mr. Speaker, on May 1, the Minister of Public Safety let it be known that he shared my concerns about the presence of a sexual predator, Clermont Bégin, in a halfway house located on a Government of Canada property near an elementary school. On May 23, the trustees of the Montreal school board unanimously voted in favour of a resolution demanding that pedophiles no longer be assigned to halfway houses located near schools.

Has the Minister of Public Safety directed Correctional Service Canada to cease this practice?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, I cannot comment specifically on this case, but in instances like these, representatives from Correctional Service engage with local officials to see if there are some things that can be done to mitigate the risks. There are things already in place. I am very concerned about these types of eventualities also.

One thing that would help is if the opposition members would support our Minister of Justice when he looks at legislation on things like making it a little more expeditious to deem dangerous offenders as dangerous offenders so they would not get out of jail in the first place. We would appreciate some support on that.

Human Resources and Social Development
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Christian Ouellet Brome—Missisquoi, QC

Mr. Speaker, there have always been significant delays in the establishment and funding of government programs for the homeless. This year, as every year, emergency transitional measures have been put in place in order to avoid an interruption of service even though the needs of the homeless increase every year.

Can the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development confirm that, this time, the new homelessness partnering strategy will be put in place on time, enabling community organizations to receive funding as of January 1, 2008?

Human Resources and Social Development
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Medicine Hat
Alberta

Conservative

Monte Solberg Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, we are very concerned about the situation for homeless people. In fact, we moved very quickly to ensure that funding agreements were in place under the national homelessness initiative.

Under the new homelessness partnering strategy, we are already seeing some new programing. However, to ensure that we do not miss a beat and that people are protected, the national homelessness initiative will go forward until the projects currently under way are finished.

Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative government has refused to allocate funding to extend the runways at the Saint-Hubert and Trois-Rivières airports. In both cases, the extensions are required for local economic development. These two airports are located in regions that did not elect a Conservative member.

However, the Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec was able to find millions of dollars to extend the runway at the Alma airport, which is located in his own riding.

Is the Conservative government in the process of punishing the regions of Quebec that did not elect Conservatives?

Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of Labour and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Mr. Speaker, indeed, the Alma airport did receive a contribution through one of the six new tools we have implemented called community economic facilities for the regions. The same goes for the others, like Sept-Îles, which enlarged its wharf.

The role—the purpose—of the Economic Development Agency of Canada is to help vulnerable regions and regions in difficulty.

The budget for Abitibi-Témiscamingue went from 4% to 7% this year; for the Eastern Townships, it went from 5% to 8%; for Quebec City, growth ranged from 7% to 22% because of the 400th anniversary and so forth. We are helping regions in difficulty.

The Budget
Oral Questions

June 13th, 2007 / 3 p.m.

Conservative

James Bezan Selkirk—Interlake, MB

Mr. Speaker, Liberal senators continue their threat to ignore the will of the House of Commons. Regarding the budget, Liberal Senator George Baker said:

—I would say I'm duty-bound not just to interfere with it but to vote against it and do whatever I could to delay it.

Last night the House of Commons voted in favour of the budget, but a delay in the Senate could result in the loss of some very important funding.

Could the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development tell the House the effect a delay in passing the budget will have on Canadian workers?

The Budget
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Medicine Hat
Alberta

Conservative

Monte Solberg Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, it is an important question. We already know the Liberal leader said that he would take away the universal child care benefit from Canadian parents, and I cannot understand that. Now he is prepared to let unelected senators take away the 40% increase for post-secondary education, $500 million in support for training, $250 million for child care spaces, a doubling of the training program budget for aboriginals.

He might think it is unfair, but it is really his job to stand up to unelected Liberal senators.

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, the June 7 speech to the natural gas conference in Ottawa by the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development is creating confusion in the Northwest Territories. In his speech the minister said, “It may be necessary to reconfigure and reinvent the project”. The confusion the minister is creating through this piecemeal approach is just one more reason that Canada must have a strategy on energy security.

Will the Conservative minister clearly state once and for all what his government's real position is on the Mackenzie Valley pipeline and end this confusion?