House of Commons Hansard #79 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was use.

Topics

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Peter MacKay Central Nova, NS

I know that Foghorn Leghorn across the way does not want the answer, Mr. Speaker, but let me continue. We have had debates in the House of Commons. We have had votes in the House of Commons, which again is something the members opposite refused to do. We have had unprecedented cooperation with the armed forces. We support the men and--

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Mercifully, I am unfamiliar with all these names.

The hon. member for Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale.

Human Rights
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

David Sweet Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, last week Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty and his trade minister stated that human rights were a federal matter and it was not the province's role to get involved. This week, after a trip to China, trade minister Pupatello suggested that Canada should nurture a dialogue with China regarding human rights in Tibet.

Could the justice minister please tell the House the government's view on who should be advancing the issue of human rights?

Human Rights
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, it was only a few days ago that the Ontario government was trying to pass off human rights as solely a federal responsibility. Now it is suggesting that there should be dialogue between the Chinese government and the Dalai Lama and that Canada may be able to help. I am glad it finally figured out that human rights are the responsibility of all levels of government.

This government is interested in promoting human rights. We continue to encourage dialogue between the Chinese government and the Dalai Lama and the full respect of all human rights.

National Defence
Oral Questions

April 15th, 2008 / 2:45 p.m.

NDP

Dawn Black New Westminster—Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Chief of the Defence Staff will announce his resignation today. This will have an effect on our troops, our international relationships and the ongoing war in Afghanistan.

General Hillier has shaped the conduct of the war in Afghanistan for both Liberal and Conservative governments. Can the defence minister explain what steps he has taken to ensure a smooth transfer of leadership at the highest level of the forces? Will Canada's next chief of the defence staff be subject to approval of the Standing Committee on National Defence prior to the appointment?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Mr. Speaker, it is somewhat ironic to see this new-found interest in the Canadian Forces by that member and the NDP.

However, again returning to the subject of General Hillier, this is a man who has overseen an unprecedented period of growth within the Canadian Forces. He spoke of “a decade of darkness”. That reversed with the coming to office of the Conservative government. We have seen investment both in our personnel and our equipment. We have seen General Hillier preside over a period of time in which the esprit de corps of the Canadian Forces has reached historic heights.

We will continue to work with the Canadian Forces to see that the forces have that leadership in the future.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister was forced to repudiate his Minister of Foreign Affairs's suggestion yesterday that the governor of Kandahar should be replaced. This has actually squeezed President Karzai by making the actual replacement of Asadullah Khalid practically impossible.

Quite frankly, the foreign affairs minister is becoming an embarrassment to all Canadians.

Does the Prime Minister not realize that putting a flat tax poster boy in charge of Canada's affairs abroad was a very bad idea? Does he not realize that the conduct of our Minister of Foreign Affairs has to be more than just a photo op?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, as the Prime Minister has said, as the Minister of Foreign Affairs has said, and as I am repeating, Afghanistan is a sovereign state that makes its own decisions about government appointments. I can assure the member that Canada fully respects this and is not calling for any changes in the Afghan government.

As the Prime Minister has said, everybody has full confidence in the Minister of Foreign Affairs. He is doing a great job for Canada, for his constituency, and for Quebec.

Federal Election
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, Barry Cooper is a good friend of the Prime Minister and Tom Flanagan. Mr. Cooper was the head of Friends of Science, a group being investigated for defrauding the University of Calgary by circulating anti-Kyoto ads during the last election campaign. Worse yet, it seems that Mr. Cooper's lobbyists were working for the Conservative Party and they were the ones deciding where those ads would be circulated.

What did the government offer in exchange for Barry Cooper's help during the last election campaign?

Federal Election
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, average Canadians are concerned about our mission in Afghanistan and concerned about the quality of health care offered to Canadians. People have real concerns about the economy and what is going on in the United States.

All we have opposite is a party with no policy, a party with no leadership, a party with no vision, and a party following these made up scandals. Those members should concentrate on the priorities of hard-working Canadians.

Federal Election
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, a research trust at the University of Calgary was misused to fund illegal advertising during the last federal election campaign. The group involved, Friends of Science, is now advising the minister on his climate change policy.

We have the likes of Flanagan, Cooper and Paulsen involved in yet another scheme to break election advertising rules. They ran climate change denier ads in five markets in Ontario. Does the House know who oversaw that? It was the environment minister.

Who is responsible for yet another attempt to cheat the electorate and buy the election?

Federal Election
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, blah, blah, blah. The member for Ottawa Centre puts on his tinfoil hat and develops these great theories.

There are two reasons why this government is in office. One is because of the leadership of the Prime Minister of Canada and the other is because of the support of the Liberal Party of Canada.

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Ken Dryden York Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, we have a Prime Minister who is willing to speak to Mr. Cadman's words and Mrs. Cadman's, and what they mean, but who is not willing to speak to his own words and what they mean. Why?

His own words. He knows what he said and why he said them. Instead, silence. Day after day.

To the Prime Minister, it is time. Just look up, just stand up, just explain.

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, the member for York Centre is setting an indoor record here for missing the point.

The simple fact of the matter is it did not happen. The Liberals have made an accusation that a $1 million life insurance policy was drawn up and offered to Chuck Cadman. It did not happen. The accusations by the Liberals are false.

The member for York Centre should be embarrassed for repeatedly asking these embarrassing questions rather than asking substantive questions that are of interest to his constituents.

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Ken Dryden York Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, nothing. Nothing. The Prime Minister just sits there with every question, slinking lower into his seat, deeper into his papers, hoping it will all go away. Well, it is not going away.

To the Prime Minister: just look up, just stand up, just explain.