House of Commons Hansard #101 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was internet.

Topics

Technical Assistance for Law Enforcement in the 21st Century Act
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

Conservative

Shelly Glover Saint Boniface, MB

Madam Speaker, I want to thank my colleague who joined me in the class of 2008 here in the House of Commons.

New members of Parliament, who just recently came here, have really formed a bond. We do share a number of conversations about the new things we see here in the House of Commons and compare them to our old lives.

As she mentioned, my policing days often get discussed because we have a need to move forward to protect Canadians, to protect not only women and children as we have discussed many times but aboriginal Canadians, Canadians of other cultures. To continually hear that we may not get the chance to defend their rights and to protect them is disturbing. Every time we hear about a looming election that could destroy all of the work that has been done is very disturbing.

As a new member of Parliament, I have been in campaign mode since the moment I arrived. Frankly, I would really like to just continue to move forward to ensure these bills are passed, so we can do the right thing, and the right thing is to protect the economy and to move to recovery.

Canadians have seen a very difficult time. We are dealing with a fragile recovery and are just at the point where Canadians are about to see the fruits of our labour after a year in the House of Commons, and yet again we hear the Liberals talking about forcing us into an election.

I really urge opposition members to take this into consideration and stop the shenanigans about upcoming elections. Let us do the hard work that Canadians want.

Technical Assistance for Law Enforcement in the 21st Century Act
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Holland Ajax—Pickering, ON

Madam Speaker, let me begin on the point that the hon. member across left off on and that is the incredible disingenuous position that it is somehow this side that is causing problems with this legislation.

It was, in fact, a Liberal government that introduced this bill in 2005 and it was the Conservative Party that took us into the polls at that time and killed this legislation.

Then the member for Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine introduced a private member's bill in the next session of Parliament that sat on the order paper. It was the same bill before us today. Who killed that? The Conservative Party.

Stephen Harper--

Technical Assistance for Law Enforcement in the 21st Century Act
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

NDP

The Acting Speaker Denise Savoie

Order, please. The member should know that he cannot use a sitting member's name.

Technical Assistance for Law Enforcement in the 21st Century Act
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Holland Ajax—Pickering, ON

The Prime Minister walked into the Governor General's office and caused an election; thus killing this bill again.

Therefore, for four years since the bill has been written and waiting to be implemented, the government through obfuscation and through creating elections has blocked the legislation from coming forward.

When finally in this session the government brought it forward, it waited until the very end of the session, the last week just before the summer recess, to introduce it to ensure that we had no time to study it or implement it. Here we are in the fall, four years after the Liberals introduced this legislation and it has not been implemented.

For the other side to talk about the urgency of this bill, about the need to pass it immediately, is disingenuous. There is no reason it should have sat on the shelf for four years. The blame lies 100% on the other side and it is 100% irresponsible.

Technical Assistance for Law Enforcement in the 21st Century Act
Government Orders

2 p.m.

NDP

The Acting Speaker Denise Savoie

Order, please. The hon. member will have 18 minutes to resume his comments.

Statements by members, the hon. member for Crowfoot.

Firearms Registry
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Kevin Sorenson Crowfoot, AB

Madam Speaker, since being elected the member of Parliament for Crowfoot, I have joined my colleagues working toward the abolishment of the failed and costly long gun registry.

My constituents have constantly and consistently contacted me opposing this issue for nine years. My predecessor, as member of Parliament, opposed the Liberal bill, Bill C-68, warning that it would not reduce gun-related violence nor protect the safety of Canadians, and that it would be too costly. He was right.

Fourteen years later, over $1 billion of taxpayer money should have been spent on policing budgets, border control, education, treatment for violent offences and help for victims.

The Canadian Taxpayers Federation is now calling for the registry to be abolished. For 14 years, law-abiding firearm owners, hunters, farmers and recreational gun groups have been targeted and are burdened with the ongoing high costs.

I call upon all Canadians to urge their member of Parliament to support Bill C-391 and abolish the long gun registry.

Tina Moores
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Scott Simms Bonavista—Gander—Grand Falls—Windsor, NL

Madam Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute and honour a truly heroic person, Tina Moores, of Grand Falls--Windsor, Newfoundland and Labrador.

On August 15, 2009, Ms. Moores, at 35 years of age, bravely lost her life in saving a 9-year-old girl from drowning at Red Indian Lake near the community of Buchans.

She was known as a kind and giving person. If she saw someone in need and was in a position to offer assistance, she was there to lend a helping hand.

Tina was an operating room nurse at the Central Regional Health Centre, a career she dearly loved. She was a certified lifeguard for many years, and she was a Red Cross water safety instructor. She was also a Special Olympics coach.

Tina was a person who had a heart of gold, a person with a great sense of humour and a great smile. She was loved by all who knew her and she did what she had to do in a difficult situation to save a young girl's life.

In the true definition of a hero, Tina Moores fits that description. She made the ultimate sacrifice and will not be forgotten. Tina will be sadly missed by her large circle of friends and her family. My thoughts and prayers go out to them all.

Cuba
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Diane Bourgeois Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Madam Speaker, tomorrow Cuba will present, for the 18th consecutive year, a draft resolution to the UN General Assembly entitled “Necessity of ending the economic, commercial and financial embargo imposed by the United States of America against Cuba”.

The embargo against Cuba affects more than one state because the extraterritorial application of U.S. laws is very prejudicial to the economic sovereignty of many other states. This embargo has a significant impact on our Quebec companies because, due to fear of reprisals by the U.S. government, they do not export to Cuba or do business with the island. The embargo has been condemned by all Central American and South American countries and Obama's administration has shown some signs of openness.

Therefore, I hope that Canada will act sensibly and once again give its unconditional support to the resolution in order to show its respect for international law.

Tax Harmonization
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

NDP

Jim Maloway Elmwood—Transcona, MB

Madam Speaker, it is public knowledge that the Conservative federal government is pressuring the Government of Manitoba to opt into a harmonized sales tax similar to its successful efforts to buy off the Liberal Governments of Ontario and British Columbia with large, one-time cash payments.

This money will make up for the provincial revenue lost from businesses as the burden is shifted to many individual taxpayers in those provinces who will have to pay a new tax on goods and services presently exempted under their provincial sales tax.

Manitobans want to know how much a new harmonized sales tax will cost the average taxpayer overall on services like funerals, air travel, home renovations, landscaping, legal fees and the purchase of new homes. Additional goods, like fast food value meals, newspapers, magazines, tobacco, gasoline and home heating fuels, will be taxed. Where is the transparency?

United Way
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Gord Brown Leeds—Grenville, ON

Madam Speaker, volunteers under the leadership of the executive director, Judi Baril, the president, Rick Fry, and campaign chairs, Andy and Sharon Jordan with the United Way of Leeds and Grenville are conducting their annual fundraising drive.

This year they are working hard to meet the campaign goal of $925,000. The money supports 27 agencies that contribute to the quality of life in Leeds and Grenville. These agencies serve 33,000 people annually.

As part of the fundraising efforts, I, along with honorary game chairman and NHL Hall of Famer, Leo Boivin, am proud to present Hockey Night in Leeds and Grenville 3.

Conservative members of Parliament, former NHL starts and local municipal and community leaders will be at the Leo Boivin Arena in Prescott on Monday night, November 16, in a charity hockey game to support the United Way.

I want to thank in advance those who are giving up their evening to play in the game and I want to invite everyone to come out and enjoy a great evening for a great cause.

Dina Ouellette
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Jean-Claude D'Amours Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to rise here today to congratulate Dina Ouellette, a citizen of my riding, who was chosen to be a guardian of the Olympic flame and to join the Canadian delegation going to Greece to bring it back.

Miss Ouellette will join the team as a first nations representative. She currently lives on the Madawaska Maliseet First Nation reserve.

In addition to having the opportunity to go to Greece to bring the Olympic flame back to Canada, Dina Ouellette will also be able to follow the flame on its journey across Canada, from Halifax, Nova Scotia as far as London, Ontario.

It is important to point out that Miss Ouellette is one of 11 aboriginal Canadians chosen as guardians of the flame.

I wish Miss Ouellette a most rewarding experience. Her determination and enthusiasm are a source of pride for everyone in Madawaska—Restigouche and for all Canadians.

Congratulations, Dina.

Saskatoon
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Kelly Block Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar, SK

Mr. Speaker, a recent survey was conducted by the Canadian Federation of Independent Business. I would like to take this opportunity to recognize and congratulate Saskatoon for ranking as the number one entrepreneurial city in all of Canada.

There is no doubt that small and medium enterprises are Canada's engines of growth.

Saskatoon is at the heart of the business boom in Saskatchewan as a result of the combination of federal, provincial and municipal tax policy adjustments that have enabled and supported business start-ups.

Communities count on businesses to play an important part in their economic and social well-being. Saskatoon has out-performed by providing a great environment for small business development. Business owners in Saskatoon have remained largely optimistic through the global downturn and, as a result, have increased the number of established businesses in our wonderful community.

Saskatoon has soared to the top and I am honoured to share this success with Canadians across the country.

Gaspé Peninsula
Statements By Members

October 27th, 2009 / 2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Raynald Blais Gaspésie—Îles-de-la-Madeleine, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to draw attention today to the fact that the October 2009 issue of Traveler, published by the famous National Geographic, included the Gaspé Peninsula among the top 50 “places of a lifetime”. My region is the only place in Quebec and one of only three in Canada to have made the list.

The Gaspé Peninsula earned this ranking in the category of “Places where man and nature live in harmony”, among such places as Asia's Gobi desert, Montenegro in Europe and Argentina's Mendoza region.

The text describing the Gaspé Peninsula was written by well-known singer-songwriter-composer Kevin Parent, who talks about places that are dear to his heart, where one can see both sea and mountains, two pillars of the Gaspé landscape. He also pays special tribute to the warmth and gregariousness of Gaspesians.

As the member of Parliament for Gaspésie—Îles-de-la-Madeleine, I am proud of such recognition, and I encourage the hon. members to let themselves be charmed by the wide expanses and spaces of leisure that make the Gaspé Peninsula such a wonderful place.

Justice
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière, QC

Mr. Speaker, we are happy to see that the bill to provide harsher punishments for identity theft crimes will soon become law.

This is yet another achievement that shows that our Conservative government works very hard when it comes to protecting Canadians.

Our greatest duty is to protect all Canadians, to protect who they are: unique individuals, whose identities are theirs alone.

Crime is always evolving. Violence often changes form, but we are confident that we are taking a big step forward with the enactment of this legislation, and we are not stopping there.

This bill is one more tool to help the police and the courts protect personal information. It updates the types of offences in the Criminal Code, and addresses traffic in identity information and traffic in government-issued identity documents.

With the support of all the parties, we are able to implement bills where immediate action is needed, because our Conservative government is responsible for you and for future generations.

Jack Poole
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, it was with great sadness that we learned of the passing of a truly great Canadian, Jack Poole.

Much of the credit for successful leadership of the bid and preparation for Vancouver's 2010 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games rests with Jack, who died last week following a battle with pancreatic cancer.

On the very day of Jack's passing, the Olympic torch, a symbol for global peace, had just been lit in Greece to mark the beginning of the torch relays for the Vancouver Games.

Although saddened by his death, I am encouraged that so many Canadians will carry forward Jack's dream of seeing the Olympics in Vancouver and Canada.

An Officer of the Order of Canada, Jack was a humanitarian who lived his life with integrity and generosity. He will be remembered by his friends and colleagues as a passionate and driven leader and philanthropist who was dedicated to the public good.

Liberal caucus members join me in offering condolences to Jacks' wife, Darlene, and their many friends and family. Our thoughts and prayers are with them.