House of Commons Hansard #110 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was home.

Topics

Trade
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Russ Hiebert South Surrey—White Rock—Cloverdale, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canada is a trading nation. Our prosperity depends on our ability to sell our goods to other countries. That is why our government is pursuing an aggressive agenda to expand trade, open doors for our exporters, encourage economic growth and create jobs for Canadians.

In four short years our Conservative government has signed new free trade agreements with Colombia, Peru, Jordan, Panama, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein. We have also launched historic trade negotiations with two of the world's largest markets, the European Union and India. We are working on new deals with countries in Europe, Asia, the Americas, Africa and the Middle East.

Our record, compared with the Liberals, could not be clearer. In 13 years the Liberals signed only three free trade agreements and caused long-term damage to our relationship with India.

In these difficult economic times, Canadians can count on our government to oppose protectionism and defend free and open trade on the world stage.

Conservative Party of Canada
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Crombie Mississauga—Streetsville, ON

Mr. Speaker, for months the Conservatives have been waving oversized cheques at infrastructure announcements with their party's logo on them; apologies followed.

At these same announcements, some members even signed those oversized cheques, giving the impression that the cheque was a personal one from the member; apologies followed.

Recently, we have seen another outrageous example of Conservative partisanship. Students were offered water bottles from a parliamentary office. The problem was the water bottles had the Conservative Party logo on them and no apologies were offered.

Kudos to Manitoba's Louis Riel school division for refusing to accept these water bottles. It goes against its policy to accept politically partisan propaganda, and rightly so.

As parliamentarians, we all know that students of all ages should be commended for their achievements. An accomplishment on bilingualism is one to be proud of and congratulated, not used as a political opportunity.

These congratulations ring hollow in the face of a political statement from a member of the House when he said, “Canada is not a bilingual country. Bilingualism is the god that failed”. Who said that? The Prime Minister.

New Member for Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup
Statements By Members

November 16th, 2009 / 2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Steven Blaney Lévis—Bellechasse, QC

Mr. Speaker, after five municipal, provincial and federal elections in less than two years, and 16 long years of the Bloc regime, the people of Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup have done the right thing and elected a new Conservative MP from Quebec.

Mayor of La Pocatière, successful entrepreneur, promoter of the Centre Bombardier with an exceptional partnership that is the envy of Quebec, Bernard Généreux and his team can now put some in the goal for Quebec.

This election proves that the Bloc Québécois no longer has a monopoly on Quebec values and that Quebeckers increasingly identify with the Conservative team in Quebec.

As Yvon Deschamps said, yes to a strong Quebec in a united Canada. Congratulations to Bernard Généreux and his team. Yes to the economic action plan. No to white collar criminals. Yes to sustainable development. Yes to action and no to an election.

Louis Riel
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, today I call upon Parliament to set the history books straight and reverse the conviction of Louis Riel for high treason and instead recognize his role as the founder of the province of Manitoba, a Father of Confederation and the champion of the rights of the Métis people.

Louis Riel was elected president of the territory that he named Manitoba and negotiated its entry into Confederation as Canada's fifth province on July 15, 1870. He was elected to the House of Commons three times. He was wrongfully tried, convicted and executed for high treason on this day in 1885, a case of justice and mercy denied.

It is consistent with history, justice and respect for the rights of the Métis people that the conviction of Louis Riel be reversed and that his historic role in the building of Canada be formally recognized, commemorated and celebrated, I suggest, by the placement of a statue of Louis Riel on the grounds of Parliament Hill.

India
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Bob Dechert Mississauga—Erindale, ON

Mr. Speaker, before the Liberal leader decided to return to Canada to be crowned, the Liberal government pursued an ideological policy of isolation toward India, slapping it with sanctions and marginalizing Canada's influence with India well into this decade.

Our government has been working to repair this long-term damage to our relationship. That is why the Prime Minister is in India this week, rebuilding relationships and deepening our economic ties with an emerging economic power.

I am happy to point out that under our government, Canada-India relations are at an all-time high. Canada's exports to India have more than doubled since our government was elected, and exports are still on the rise. We recently expanded our trade network in India to eight offices, making it one of Canada's largest networks worldwide.

When it comes to free and open trade with important allies like India, it is this government that is getting the job done.

Soldiers from Valcartier
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Bloc

Pascal-Pierre Paillé Louis-Hébert, QC

Mr. Speaker, 115 soldiers from the Valcartier base returned home to their loved ones on Saturday evening from a mission to Afghanistan. These soldiers, assigned to the Aviation Batallion, were responsible for transporting soldiers close to combat locations. They participated in 33 missions and their expertise provided support for the work of all coalition soldiers present in Afghanistan.

The community of Valcartier was particularly hard hit this year with the loss of 13 soldiers in Afghanistan, bringing the total to 23.

These men and women will have to return to their regular lives after a long and trying mission. It is important that they are not left to their own devices and that they are given all the resources needed to resume a normal life, away from war zones.

The Bloc Québécois would like to salute the courage and commitment of these soldiers. We wish them all the best as they return to their families.

Louis Riel
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Beauséjour, NB

Mr. Speaker, 124 years ago today, Canada lost one of its most famous citizens. We lost a man who will forever be a symbol of the difficulties our country faced in its early days.

Whether remembered as a defender of the Métis people, the founder of Manitoba, or a Father of Confederation, the lore of Louis Riel is central to Canada's past.

Louis Riel's fight in the 1800s to protect Métis rights and culture made him a strong voice for the Métis people during a turbulent time in Canadian history. In fact, the strength of the Métis today can be traced back to Louis Riel's efforts, which made the Métis nation an ongoing, vibrant part of our national identity.

Louis Riel's struggle will forever be ingrained in our collective psyche. His memory is now part of our country's great history. Today, on the anniversary of his death, we celebrate the life of Louis Riel, as well as the culture, languages and heritage of the Canadian Métis people.

Byelections
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Gerald Keddy South Shore—St. Margaret's, NS

Mr. Speaker, one week ago, four new members were elected to the House of Commons. The results were clear. Canadians believe that our government is on the right track and Canadians can count on our Conservative government to continue to work hard for their families and their communities.

Congratulations to Bernard Généreux, who won in Montmagny–L'Islet–Kamouraska–Rivière-du-Loup, and to Scott Armstrong in Cumberland--Colchester--Musquodoboit Valley, who will be joining our Conservative government as we continue to implement Canada's economic action plan.

Our government is focused on the economic recovery. We have been working closely with the provinces and the territories to face the threat of H1N1 head-on. We are working hard to pass our tough on crime legislation. The results make clear that Canadians want a government that has their interests at heart and a government that understands the challenges that Canadians are facing.

Again, congratulations to Scott and Bernard. Their hard work has been recognized. Welcome to the House.

Health
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, the last time the House sat, the Minister of Health claimed that every Canadian who wanted the H1N1 vaccine would receive it before Christmas. Now, she is saying that the rollout will take up to 12 more weeks and run well into next February.

Why did the minister mislead the House and why did she not tell Canadians the truth?

Health
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, we have said all along that we would try and complete the vaccination program by December. In fact, we were early in the rollout of our campaign across the country.

I want to acknowledge all the hard work of the people on the front line who are doing a fantastic job in getting the immunizations out to Canadians. By the end of this week, we will have over 10.4 million vaccines in the provinces and territories.

Health
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, in order to stop the pandemic in its tracks, health experts tell us that 60% to 70% of Canadians need to be immunized. The sooner we reach this goal, the more unnecessary deaths and illnesses will be prevented.

Will the government abide by the will of Parliament and finally give the provinces, territories and local public health units the money and resources they need to quickly and effectively administer the vaccine?

Health
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, this year, in the 2009-10 budget, we transferred $24 billion to the provinces and territories under the Canada Health Act. That is the highest amount ever transferred to the provinces.

In addition to that, we invested $1 billion to develop a pandemic plan. In addition to that, we also purchased 50.4 million vaccines for every single Canadian who wants it and needs it.

Health
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, public health units are being forced to spend their very scarce resources on translating and re-translating messages for ethnic communities without a penny of assistance from the federal government.

Will the government commit the money and resources for accurate translation to ensure that all Canadians are receiving accurate public health information on H1N1?

Health
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I want to acknowledge the health authorities in the provinces and territories who are doing a very good job in delivering the program. If the member were to do her research, she would see on the local websites that there are over 20 languages in Ontario alone.

In most jurisdictions, based on their populations, they have translated the materials to the populations they serve. In my territory, they are in Inuinnaqtun, Inuktitut, English and French. In the Northwest Territories, they are in another language. In Ontario, there are about 19. If she did her research, she would see that the provinces and territories are doing a great job in getting the message out.

Health
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Health is revising her vaccination schedule yet again. First, she said that Canadians would be vaccinated at the beginning of November, then in December, then by Christmas. Now she is saying that the vaccination will be delayed by three months, which takes us to mid-February 2010.

Can the minister explain to Canadians that this government's incompetence and mismanagement is causing these unacceptable delays?