House of Commons Hansard #119 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was drugs.

Topics

Access to Medicines Regime
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis Winnipeg North, MB

Mr. Speaker, night has already fallen in much of Africa. Another day has passed and another 14,000 people have died needlessly from infectious diseases for which medicine is readily available, just not for them.

It is mostly grandmothers who care for the dying and who are left to piece together the shattered lives that remain. They tell us through the Grandmothers to Grandmothers Campaign, Canadian women devoting incredible energy in solidarity with their African sisters, that Canada's access to medicines regime, which was supposed to make more drugs available, is not working.

UNICEF, Oxfam, Canadian Crossroads International, Results Canada and the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network all agree and have called for the changes set out in my private member's Bill C-393. I urge all members to vote for this bill to ensure that we fix Canada's access to medicines regime and get Canadian drugs moving to save lives.

Official Languages
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière, QC

Mr. Speaker, this week I witnessed something that I never expected would happen. The Bloc voted to prevent me from obtaining a document in French even though they are always going on about protecting the French language.

The Bloc obviously forgot to keep up the pretence. Its fine words disappear without a trace but the written record remains.

I am a parliamentarian and, like all Canadians, I have the right to obtain English government documents translated into French. When I raised the matter, the Bloc leader laughed at me and ridiculed me. I would like a formal apology from the Bloc.

I am not sure which Quebec the Bloc leader claims to represent, but it is certainly not my Quebec. I would go so far as to say that Quebeckers trust the Conservative government to preserve the rights of francophones.

Immigration
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Thierry St-Cyr Jeanne-Le Ber, QC

Mr. Speaker, in his new guide “Discover Canada”, the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism points out that Quebec is a nation and that the majority of its population is francophone. However, there is not a word to new immigrants about Bill 101 and the requirement to send their children to a French school.

This guide also completely omits the fact that new arrivals have to learn French first in order to settle in Quebec. A unanimous motion in this Parliament clearly indicates that is the case.

Instead, the guide goes on at length about the Queen, even describing her as “the focus of citizenship, ... guardian of Constitutional freedoms, reflection of our history and an encouragement for Canadians to give their best to their country”.

How shocking. Instead of promoting an obsolete institution to which Quebeckers have no allegiance, the minister should be reminding immigrants that in Quebec we live our lives in French.

Canadian Football League
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Bernard Patry Pierrefonds—Dollard, QC

Mr. Speaker, Grey Cup fever is in the air. The final match of the CFL playoffs is being held this Sunday.

The melon heads are sure to turn out in droves at Calgary's McMahon Stadium to cheer for Saskatchewan's pride and glory, the Roughriders.

To challenge them, Montreal is sending its Alouettes. While I mean no disrespect to the Roughriders, I think they will find the Alouettes not so friendly.

Last night the Alouettes quarterback, Anthony Calvillo, received the CFL outstanding player award for the second consecutive year and the third time in his career.

It will mark the 97th occasion Lord Grey's silver is at stake and as it does every year, it promises to be an epic battle.

The stakes are high. The mayors of Regina and Montreal have made their bets. The losing mayor must wear the winning team's jersey at a city council meeting and fly the winning team's flag in front of city hall.

Go, Als, go.

Liberal Party Fundraising
Statements By Members

November 27th, 2009 / 11:15 a.m.

Conservative

Dean Del Mastro Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, after the Liberal decade of darkness this government has invested in the Canadian armed forces because we support our troops, not because of political gain, but out of national pride. That is why it is shameful the Liberal leader would show such calculated cynicism by fundraising on the issue of detainees.

Even the Liberal member for Vancouver South, when asked if this was appropriate, said unequivocally, “No, it's not”.

When the Liberal leader fundraises on the backs of our soldiers and their sacrifices, it proves what we have been saying all along: He is in it for himself.

We will not stand idly by while the Liberal leader tries to score political points by smearing our soldiers in this House or anywhere else in this country.

There will be more questions today about our soldiers and our military leadership, but the real question now is are the Liberals asking these questions to help, or are they asking these questions to fill the Liberal leader's war chest?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, in 2006 the United States Department of State noted a human rights report in which authorities allegedly continued to routinely torture and abuse detainees. Torture and abuse consisted of pulling out fingernails and toenails, burning with hot oil, beatings, sexual humiliation and sodomy.

A year later the United Nations Secretary-General told the Security Council that initial findings noted that ill treatment and torture had been used to force confessions.

Would the minister not at least agree that in 2006 reports of widespread abuse were available to the Government of Canada?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, we have always been perfectly clear. When military and diplomats have been presented with credible, substantiated evidence, they have taken the appropriate action.

Canada instituted an enhanced arrangement with Afghanistan over two and a half years ago. The agreement replaced the inadequate prisoner transfer agreement that was left by the previous government. That is why we established this agreement. That is why we took action.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, what the minister would now appear to be saying is that in 2006 there were problems, which is exactly what Mr. Colvin was saying, which is exactly what others were saying.

However, the problem is that it was not possible for Canada to investigate independently any allegations. Department of Foreign Affairs officials said “We don't investigate allegations. We record them”.

In light of that fact, could the minister explain why it took a year and a half for his government to develop the political will to finally get the evidence?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, we have now heard testimony from three respected generals, three Canadian heroes, three of the country's highest-ranking military officers. We have heard from a senior diplomat. These generals and the diplomat have thoroughly rejected the allegations that have been made against them, that the opposition parties were just too eager to believe.

What is incredibly regretful is that the Liberal Party has tried to use this issue to raise funds in $25, $50 and $100 denominations. That is wrong. That does not serve the interests of our troops. Frankly, the Liberals should be ashamed of themselves.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the problem with the minister's answer is very simple. The government has all the information and is refusing to give it to us. We do not have access to the documents we need to find the truth.

So far, it is clear that the government is refusing to disclose the information and also refusing to face a huge problem, which is that for more than a year, the Canadian government did not conduct an investigation, but just tried to record—

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Conservative

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, let us be very clear. Government officials have provided and will continue to provide all legally available information. Yesterday in committee we heard from David Mulroney, a well respected senior public servant. We heard from three Canadian heroes, Generals Hillier, Gauthier and Fraser, who have called these allegations ludicrous.

We have one single priority when it comes to our armed forces and on this issue. It is to support and protect our men and women in uniform. We will not go on a political fundraising drive by maligning our men and women in uniform. That is shameful.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Brian Murphy Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, NB

Mr. Speaker, the government is making false claims that there is no proof that Afghans detained by the Canadian Forces were tortured.

Yet Mr. Colvin clearly stated that because of the nature of the detainee transfer system, it was not possible to make such a claim.

The Red Cross confirms what Mr. Colvin said, and yesterday, David Mulroney confirmed it as well.

When will the government finally admit that Mr. Colvin, the Red Cross and Mr. Mulroney are right?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence and Minister for the Atlantic Gateway

Mr. Speaker, two and a half years ago when we fixed the flawed, inadequate arrangement left by the government opposite, we then went about investing in and improving the Afghan justice system. Nobody has ever said there were not any problems.

Let us look at what Mr. David Mulroney had to say, not the partisan attacks, not an attempt to politicize the issue. Here is what he said: “I can say we have no evidence that any Canadian transfer of detainees was mistreated.... We never, ever transferred anyone if we thought there was a substantial risk of torture. We knew there were problems in the Afghan system, but we developed a robust monitoring system”.

Those are the words of a respected diplomat doing the work, not partisan--

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe.