House of Commons Hansard #70 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was crime.

Topics

Minister of Natural Resources
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, that is a bunch of nonsense. I guess the hon. member did not hear my answer earlier today. The minister is not a party to the action, and the Government of Canada is not involved.

Justice
Oral Questions

June 8th, 2009 / 2:45 p.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is now four days since the Federal Court ordered the government to facilitate the immediate return to Canada of Mr. Abdelrazik. He is required to appear before the court at 2 p.m. on July 7, 2009, whether the government launches an appeal or not. He has in his possession a fully paid ticket for June 12.

Can the Minister of Foreign Affairs finally get to his feet in this House and tell us what arrangements he has made to provide the necessary travel for Mr. Abdelrazik to return on June 12?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I would be glad to tell the House that we are reviewing that decision very carefully and we will be making a decision in due course.

CIDA
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Johanne Deschamps Laurentides—Labelle, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of International Cooperation contends that they are generalists at CIDA and that, if they need expertise, they need to go outside. According to her own officials, however, there are five health experts within CIDA, including two medical doctors.

How does the minister reconcile her statement with her officials' comments to the contrary?

CIDA
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, I recognize the capacity and the expertise of the CIDA staff. However, together we have discussed the level of expertise that we will require as we go forward to ensure that our aid will be maximized in its effectiveness and efficiency.

We always want to benefit from Canadian expertise in all the work we do.

CIDA
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Johanne Deschamps Laurentides—Labelle, QC

Mr. Speaker, the minister went as far as to state that CIDA and its personnel were much more focused on measuring the amount of money going into a project than on the results.

Does the minister think that such rude remarks are helping to improve morale among her staff as she prepares to undertake reforms within CIDA?

CIDA
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, I know everyone at CIDA and everyone in this government as well as in the House wants to respond to the many studies that have been done about CIDA.

There is a Senate report to which we are responding. All parties in the House had members on that committee, which made recommendations, and we are responding to those recommendation. We are eager to find a renewed CIDA that will be effective in this century and in these decades going forward.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Marc Garneau Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, our towns and municipalities feel that they have been abandoned by the Conservatives. It seems as though the infrastructure money will never come, and it is already June 8. Furthermore, the protectionist measures passed by Congress are threatening the Canadian companies that rely on the American market. No one in the United States seems to be listening to the Conservatives.

What is their plan to combat American protectionism and to avoid a trade war?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

We are concerned about the Buy American situation in the United States. That is why we developed a strategy to present our concerns to the Americans a few weeks ago. I will give another example. I was at the municipal conference three days ago to get the support of municipalities from across the country, to present our message, and tomorrow, there will be another campaign, in Washington, with all of our trade advisors.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Marc Garneau Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, since the minister was there, he will have heard Canadian municipalities express their frustration with growing U.S. protectionism by threatening to retaliate in kind.

While we all know that protectionism is the worst possible reaction to a global recession, the government's absence from the bargaining table in Washington has forced the hand of Canadian cities and communities. Canadian manufacturers and steel producers are being locked out of U.S. contracts because of buy America provisions.

Since the American Congress has yet to listen to the Conservatives, what is their plan now?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, it sounds like my hon. friend was not in attendance at the convention of municipalities and mayors. I was there over this weekend. I was pleased to not only be there, but also to read the reports when it ended. Clearly the municipalities are backing the strategy we have been taking at every level.

On Friday, I spoke again with the chairman of the ways and means committee in the United States and also the secretary of commerce. Tomorrow, there will be trade commissioners and people from our embassy having a full day of campaign on this on the Hill. It will continue.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, for years now the Conservative government has justified its own failure to fight climate change by blaming other countries like China and India. However, a new UN report shows that both countries are leaving Canada far behind when it comes to renewable energy. China alone is spending $15 billion, and still the government keeps its head buried in the tar sands.

China gets it. India gets it, as does the rest of the world. Surely the government will finally drop its dead ideology and understand that fighting climate change will create the green economy that Canadians so desperately need.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the question is really preposterous. Canada has among the cleanest electricity systems in the world and 73% of Canada's electricity system is non-emitting. The government has set an objective to achieve 90% by 2020. That is an indication of the natural endowments that we are blessed with in terms of hydro potential. It is also an indication of the capacity and potential of our nuclear industry.

This government will continue to work on renewable energies and get the job done.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, the government just does not get it.

The budget killed the eco-energy renewable power program at a loss of thousands of jobs in Alberta alone. By this September, zero federal funds will be available to a sector that was attracting billion dollar investments.

Why has the government abandoned Canada's renewable energy sector, when even the International Energy Agency says investing in green power is the path to economic recovery?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Halton
Ontario

Conservative

Lisa Raitt Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member's question gives me a great opportunity to tell the House about the great things this government has done with respect to renewable energy and facilitating bringing renewable power on the grid.

As we have heard already in the House, it is the objective of this government to reach 90% non-emitting electricity by 2020. We are fully committed to that and working toward it.

More important, we have committed $3.7 billion already to renewable energy and the $1 billion clean energy fund will also be put forth in that manner.