House of Commons Hansard #105 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was military.

Topics

Securities Industry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Meili Faille Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Department of Finance's absurd plan to have a single securities commission is floundering, while Alberta and Saskatchewan are looking at the possibility of creating a joint securities commission. Concerns about the minister's plan are clearly growing.

As of right now, Quebec and five provinces have expressed opposition to the plan. That is a lot of opposition. Frankly, this plan is very divisive. What is the minister waiting for to abandon this plan?

Securities Industry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, as I have already said, this plan is optional for the provinces. I am happy that 10 provinces and territories are on board .

This is an optional plan. If Quebec does not want to join the plan, that is okay. If Alberta does not want to join the plan, that is okay.

I am surprised to see the suggestion in the press that Alberta wants to create a common regulator with Saskatchewan, because it has taken the position that it does not need a common regulator. However, that is okay and that inconsistency is okay also. Everyone has a choice in Canada and it is a good thing for the country.

Securities Industry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Meili Faille Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, no one, except in Ontario, is interested in a Canada-wide securities commission.

The evidence is growing daily. Does the minister not think that he should abandon his Supreme Court challenge to strip Quebec of its financial autonomy and give up on this plan that no one is interested in, no one besides his Bay Street buddies, that is?

Securities Industry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member is talking nonsense. Where there is an optional plan where there is a choice, how can it be said by any reasonable person that any province is losing anything? Any province or territory that does not want to join a Canadian securities regulator may choose not to join the Canadian securities regulator. That is it, that is all.

Census
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Ruby Dhalla Brampton—Springdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, from an order paper question, we learned that over 700 different clients and over 50 federal government agencies have all bought reports to develop policies and deliver programs to help aboriginals, visible minorities, the disabled, seniors, women and unemployed workers. There has been an outcry from across the country, including cities like Brampton and regions like Peel, to save the census. Why are they being ignored? Why are ethnic communities and minorities being abandoned in Canada? Why are they being left to fend for themselves?

Census
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont
Alberta

Conservative

Mike Lake Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, speaking of part of an outcry here, I have a letter written by the Liberal member of Parliament for Richmond Hill in 2006 to the then industry minister where he was hearing an outcry from his constituents. He writes that they are primarily concerned with the great deal of personal information they are required to fill out and therefore potential invasion of privacy. He says, “I share this constituent's concern”.

We will no longer threaten Canadians with jail time and fines because they do not want to tell the government what their religion is.

Census
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Ruby Dhalla Brampton—Springdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is not about threatening Canadians, it is about helping minority communities in Canada. I would encourage the member to look at a letter that I have written to the Minister of Industry on behalf of the cities like Brampton and the region of Peel. We have 297 government bodies, 232 businesses, 66 non-profit organizations and 54 health and social service agencies all across the country that need the data and use the data.

Why is the government ignoring the facts, because the fact is that the census is helping minority communities? Why are the Conservatives silencing the voices of Canada's minorities?

Census
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont
Alberta

Conservative

Mike Lake Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member says that it is not about threatening Canadians, but what happens to new Canadians who do not want to tell the government what their religion is? What happens is that an enumerator fills out what is called a total refusal form. At the top of the form it says that the information provided in the following sections may be used to support a legal prosecution. The other line the enumerator fills out asks for a description of the person who refused, for example, age, gender, height, weight, other physical details, such as facial hair, tattoos, glasses, birthmarks, distinctive clothing, et cetera.

I would say that seems a little heavy-handed approach for someone who does not want to tell the government what his or her religion is.

Product Safety
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Glenn Thibeault Sudbury, ON

Mr. Speaker, across North America today marks Black Friday, the beginning of the holiday shopping season. Bill C-36, Canada's updated product safety legislation, passed by the House with all-party support, is being held hostage in the Senate for a second time in the past 14 months. Canadians need up to date product safety legislation now. Our children should not be opening toys this Christmas laced with cadmium.

Will the Senate again be obstructionist and act in contravention of the House, or will it respect the will of the House and pass Bill C-36 before the holidays?

Product Safety
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Colin Carrie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, Canadians should have confidence in the consumer products that they buy and the best way to do that and to ensure that countries and their importers comply is to pass our Canadian consumer product safety bill, Bill C-36. We are eagerly awaiting the passage of the bill in the Senate and we hope this time around the Liberal senators will not hold it up.

Product Safety
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Glenn Thibeault Sudbury, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is not the colour of the unelected senators' tie, it is whether they will respect the will of the House.

The protection of our children should be paramount to the government. Parents have a right to know that the products they are giving their children are safe and toxin free. This is why the government needs to ensure that Bill C-36 is passed before Christmas.

Will the government show some leadership and tell its unelected bagmen in the Senate to adopt this important legislation for the safety of our children?

Product Safety
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I find it absolutely astonishing that the NDP, on one hand, would complain about the Senate of Canada and then, on the other hand, not agree to support our legislation to reform the Senate.

We have been trying to get the NDP and all opposition parties to support our reforms to the Senate for many months. I cannot find anything more hypocritical than a member of the NDP saying, on the one hand, that the Senate is bad and yet he will not try to make it good.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

November 26th, 2010 / 11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Randy Hoback Prince Albert, SK

Mr. Speaker, this week, the public safety committee heard from witnesses on an important bill that would eliminate pardons on serious crimes. Committee members heard from ex-cons who want to leave the pardon system as is. It also heard from first-hand victims who said that while criminals' jail terms may end, their suffering lasts a lifetime.

Would the Minister of Public Safety tell the House how this bill would make repeat offenders more accountable?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, a criminal's right should not come first in our criminal justice system. As I said at the public safety committee, we need to draw the line somewhere. Our proposals are tough but reasonable and would make repeat offenders more accountable to victims for their crimes.

We call upon the opposition to support Bill C-23B, a bill that would deny child sex offenders the right to ever receive a pardon.

Canadian Somali Community
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Rob Oliphant Don Valley West, ON

Mr. Speaker, I recently met with the Ottawa Orléans Somali Community Organization. It shared its deep concern about the current situation for the Somali community in Ontario, particularly youth.

In Ottawa, where over 8,000 of them live, more than 60% of Somalis live below the poverty line. Understandably, they are worried about the future of their kids. They lack the necessary language training, settlement services, educational and recreational opportunities to thrive here.

What will the government do to help Somali Canadians in Ontario?