House of Commons Hansard #105 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was review.

Topics

Strengthening Military Justice in the Defence of Canada Act
Government Orders

10:50 a.m.

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Edmonton Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, since we seem to have unanimous consent to stray off topic, let me follow up on that one.

I would like to ask the hon. member about something that came up yesterday. The hon. member from the NDP talked about the Afghans not needing training because they beat the Russians.

I would like my hon. colleague's comment on the fact that we are not training the Afghans to be an insurgency. We are training the Afghan national army to be a professional organization mirroring as much as possible the Canadian Forces to actually deal with an insurgency. There is a subtle difference that may have been lost on the NDP. I would like my hon. colleague's comments on that.

Strengthening Military Justice in the Defence of Canada Act
Government Orders

10:50 a.m.

Liberal

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, the parliamentary secretary posed a very good question and he worded it very well. He is absolutely right. We are actually scaling up the ability of the Afghans not only to have a constabulary force, but also an army so that we can be out of there and the Afghan people can provide for their own security.

In reference to the question by the NDP member, if we did not have a constabulary force in Canada, if we did not have an army to provide for our own security, what would we have? There would be anarchy. In countries without a proper police force, without a proper justice system, without a proper army, civilians are left to elements that are untoward and that can cause quite a bit of destruction and havoc.

We enjoy a secure country, so why on earth would we not enable other countries to have access to the same elements of a secure country? This involves a constabulary force, a strong economy, a strong justice system. It also involves the police which I would argue are more important, as the parliamentary secretary alluded to. At the end of the day the police are more important than the army in providing the day-to-day on the ground security for the people.

Once upon a time there was an Afghan domestic police force and remnants of it still remain. That grassroots police force which was driven from a tribal level had a great deal of respect. If the constabulary initiative we are engaging in with the Afghan national police can incorporate that historical element of a domestic grassroots, partially tribal-based Afghan national police force, we would have a culturally congruent Afghan national police constabulary force that could be secure and supported by the people in the long term.

Strengthening Military Justice in the Defence of Canada Act
Government Orders

10:50 a.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to speak to Bill C-41, regarding military justice.

First, I have to respond to the comments in the last back and forth between the two members. It should be noted that the parliamentary secretary was trying to attribute the comments of the former Liberal leader to the NDP. My colleague was simply trying to get an actual position from the Liberal Party, which is difficult to do these days. He was raising the point that the former Liberal leader, the new ally or old ally, I do not know anymore, of the Conservative government, was asking why it is that we need to train more troops. It was his supposition, not that of my friend from Winnipeg. We have simply said that NATO is already going to meet its goals by next year and, as the parliamentary secretary knows, so is the Pentagon. Why did it break its promise and abandon the civilian equation?

It is a matter of getting things straight, and I know the parliamentary secretary was challenged at the special committee on Afghanistan on even knowing what the numbers were for his own government. It is interesting that he would now take the assertions of the former Liberal leader that there need not be more training for the Afghans because they beat the Russians. It was the former Liberal leader who said that. I know the member from B.C., his colleague who sits just a couple of desks away from the former Liberal Party leader, would know that as well.

Now that I have cleared that up, which is always difficult when we are dealing with a government that does not even read its own press releases, let us talk about the bill before of us.

When we are looking at strengthening military justice, it is important that we understand the ambit of this. This is an area that is important to look at. The last time we looked at the issue was in 1998. We were considering Bill C-25 at that time, legislation to modernize the defence act. However, the importance of military justice vis-à-vis changes to our Constitution and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms was not looked at.

Let me be very clear with the government that we will be supporting sending this bill to committee. I do not want the government to misquote us or attribute our comments according to what the Liberals might say on any given day, which is always challenging. Let me be crystal clear. We will support sending this bill to committee with a view to looking at strengthening some of its provisions.

With respect to this review, our members have already mentioned that we need to get it right. On the one hand, we need to look at what the responsibilities are of the military in terms of its conduct and allowing the military to discipline its troops in a way that is in line with its mandate. On the other hand, we also have to recognize the rights of members of our military as citizens, and ensure that they do not forgo the rights they have as everyday citizens.

It is a balancing act between recognizing the rights of members of our military as citizens of Canada in line with the charter provisions and understanding the unique role of the military in our society and the way it conducts itself. When we are talking about summary justice, for instance, the military has a special role to play which allows it to use its disciplinary tools.

I remember talking to my grandfather about my father's service in the second world war. As a sergeant, he had to ensure that the troops who were working with him understood that there was a code of conduct. In the case of my grandfather's service in the first world war, he told me about the fear that was invoked by his commanding officers. That was important because the discipline that is needed when in situ and also when being trained must be understood.

There is also a need for justice to be supported when there are allegations of misconduct. That is where we have to get the balance right. Notwithstanding the need for proper discipline, the need for summary justice for military conduct, we also need to ensure that if there are allegations of misconduct and there is a serious charge against a member of our military, that he or she is afforded the same protections the he or she would get if he or she had been charged outside the military under the ambit of the Criminal Code of Canada. That is where we have serious concerns.

If we look at the balance between the support of someone who is coming forward in the military justice framework versus regular court proceedings, we would know there is not an equal support for troops who are under the guise of military justice.

Strengthening Military Justice in the Defence of Canada Act
Government Orders

10:55 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

I hesitate to interrupt the hon. member but, as he knows, it is 11 o'clock. He will have 14 minutes remaining in the time allotted for his remarks when debate is resumed on this matter.

Demolition Festival
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Conservative

Steven Blaney Lévis—Bellechasse, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to welcome a dynamic team of young volunteers who have made the trip to Parliament Hill today, despite the inclement weather. Nothing can stop this group, which has created a major, exciting recreational event and tourist attraction in Bellechasse.

For its fifth edition, the now famous Festival des Barres-à-Jack in Saint-Raphaël drew over 10,000 people this summer. On a site that has received environmental approval to host demolition derbies, the Barres-à-Jack team breaks new ground every year with exciting races in which the participants spend hours perfecting their machines. From the combine race to the now famous hearse derby, they will stop at nothing to provide one-of-a-kind entertainment, and this year was no different. From having participated myself, I can truly say it was an exciting experience.

As they share their passion with the rest of Canada today, I believe they are perfect role models for how people can become involved in their communities. Congratulations to the Barres-à-Jack team and thank you for volunteering at such a unique and popular event.

Mosque and Synagogue Twinning Initiative
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Rob Oliphant Don Valley West, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise today in the House to congratulate the Jewish and Muslim communities in Don Valley West for their exemplary twinning initiative between mosque and synagogue.

As part of a North America-wide initiative, Temple Emanu-El and the Noor Cultural Centre organized a weekend of events that focused on the theme “Struggling with the language and imagery of war within our traditions”.

The weekend featured Jum'ah prayers at the Noor Centre, Shabbat services at Temple Emanu-El, lectures from Jewish and Muslim spiritual leaders and discussions among members of both communities.

They have demonstrated a fine example of true inter-culturalism, strengthening the relationships between Jews and Muslims and building bridges for a better Canada.

I was pleased to be part of this endeavour and commend both communities for making this event such a success, especially Samira Kanji and Joe Goodbaum, Rabbi Debra Landsberg and Dr. Timothy Gianotti, Dr. Mahmoud Ayoub and Rabbi Dr. Reuven Firestone.

[Member spoke in Arabic and Hebrew as follows:]

As-Salamu Alaykum. Shabbat Shalom.

Estelle Desfossés
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Bloc

Luc Malo Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am very proud to pay tribute today to Estelle Desfossés, who is this year's recipient of the City of Gatineau award for her contribution and dedication to culture.

On November 10, at the Culturiades 2010 gala of excellence, the Fondation pour les arts, les lettres et la culture en Outaouais recognized Ms. Desfossés for her outstanding contribution to the development and advancement of the Salon du livre de l'Outaouais.

Ms. Desfossés, who is passionate about the arts in all their forms, was honoured for her integrity and her outstanding commitment to making this event a success year after year. The Salon du livre de l'Outaouais, Quebec's third-largest book fair, attracted some 31,000 book lovers to its 31st edition, which ran from February 25 to 28 this year.

My Bloc Québécois colleagues join me in congratulating Ms. Desfossés on her award, and we thank her for being so actively involved in the cultural life of the Outaouais region. We are also glad that she is part of our team on Parliament Hill.

Canada Post
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

NDP

Jim Maloway Elmwood—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, earlier this week two areas of Winnipeg affected by a new technology being used by Canada Post to pre-sort mail suffered temporary work stoppages that delayed local delivery.

The local sorting and distribution centres in South Winnipeg and the Transcona portion of my own Elmwood—Transcona riding had work disruptions as a result.

It is well known that Winnipeg letter carriers face adverse weather conditions like rain, ice and snow.

The problem in a nutshell is that the new sorting machines can only handle approximately 80% of the materials having to be sorted, while the delivery workers are expected to manually sort the remaining 20%. Management demands delivery staff carry two separate bags of arranged mail at the same time and juggle both.

I hope that some common sense can be used to take advantage of the experience of people who actually do the work. It should at least be expected from a high-profile public crown corporation like Canada Post.

Diabetes
Statements By Members

11 a.m.

Conservative

Colin Carrie Oshawa, ON

Mr. Speaker, November 14 was World Diabetes Day.

Many families, including my own, are affected by this condition. Today, more than nine million Canadians live with diabetes or pre-diabetes. Diabetes rates are expected to increase substantially over the coming years, and we must continue to fight against this growing public health epidemic.

Our government remains committed to finding a cure for diabetes. We are proud to say that last November this government committed $20 million as part of a $34 million partnership with the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation to support the development of a Canadian clinical trials network, a groundbreaking effort to accelerate made in Canada solutions to the management, care and cure of type 1 diabetes.

Thanks to the exceptional work of JDRF and its partners, we are closer than ever to finding a cure. I ask my colleagues to join me in recognizing the ongoing commitment of the millions of Canadians who have built awareness of and live with diabetes in Canada.

Special Olympics Canada Award
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Cape Breton—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to recognize the achievements of an exemplary young woman from my constituency of Cape Breton—Canso.

Next Tuesday in Toronto, Lynette Sampson from Sydney River will receive the Female Athlete of the Year award from Special Olympics Canada.

Lynette's achievements in the swimming pool over the past year have been nothing short of outstanding. In July she won a silver medal in the 25 metre backstroke and a bronze medal in the 50 metre freestyle event at the 2010 Special Olympics Canada Summer Games in London, Ontario.

In May she was named Special Olympics Cape Breton's top female athlete. In July, she learned she would be named Nova Scotia's top female Special Olympian, and now she will receive this national award, which takes into account not only her athletic achievements but her overall outlook on life as well.

I know it was a proud moment for all a year ago when she carried the Olympic torch on to the stage at the Joan Harriss Cruise Pavilion. It will be just as thrilling, I am sure, Tuesday in Toronto when she leaves the stage as Canada's top female Special Olympian.

Please join me, my colleagues in the House and all people from Cape Breton—Canso in asking Lynette to accept my heartfelt congratulations—

Grey Cup
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

David Anderson Cypress Hills—Grasslands, SK

Mr. Speaker, last year the Saskatchewan Roughriders came within a hair's breadth of winning the Grey Cup. This Sunday, green vengeance will sweep over the Alouettes in Edmonton. The green and white will end their 100th season in victory, to the delight of nearly 100% of the fans in attendance.

There is a reason the Roughriders sell more CFL merchandise than all the other teams combined. Decades of socialist oppression forced the residents of Saskatchewan to scatter across this great country. Yet they always carried Saskatchewan and Rider pride in their hearts. It is why Canada has now became Rider nation. As the premier reminds us, we have never won a cup with the NDP in power.

Saskatchewan is growing in numbers and reaching her full potential, thanks to Premier Brad Wall's leadership. Likewise, under the leadership of coach Ken Miller and quarterback Darian Durant, the Roughriders have fought their way to the top once again.

This shall be our finest hour. Congratulations Saskatchewan. Au revoir, Montreal.

Sainte-Élisabeth and Sanankoroba Communities
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Guy André Berthier—Maskinongé, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to speak about the twinning between the municipality of Sainte-Élisabeth and the Malian community of Sanankoroba. For 25 years, these two communities have been working together on various strategic projects. This venture has resulted in friendly relations based on mutual respect.

On November 6, I attended a rally in Sainte-Élisabeth. More than 200 people, including the mayor, Mario Houle, attended our gala where we celebrated this 25th anniversary of the collaboration with emotion and mutual admiration, and also raised money to buy a tractor for Sanankoroba.

A few years ago, the village was going through some tough times, but things have turned around since then. This shows how beneficial twinning can be and how the people of Sainte-Élisabeth have helped improve the situation.

Congratulations to the Des Mains pour Demain committee, the municipal authorities and the entire population of Sainte-Élisabeth.

Grey Cup
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Sylvie Boucher Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Mr. Speaker, determination, courage and passion. These terms describe our Montreal Alouettes who, this weekend, will try to win the prestigious Grey Cup championship for the second consecutive year.

In front of a roaring crowd at the east division final in Montreal last Sunday, the Alouettes pummelled the Toronto Argonauts.

In this year's final game, our Larks will meet the Saskatchewan Roughriders in a fight to the finish. But Marc Trestman's team will not back down.

Our pride in the Alouettes will continue to be immense when they win the Canadian Football League championship once again.

On behalf of everyone in the Quebec Conservative caucus, I wish the Alouettes the best of luck. Go Alouettes go.

Oscar Duquette
Statements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honour the memory of Mr. Oscar Duquette.

Born in Hull on May 28, 1896, he worked as a firefighter for the old City of Hull and then as an RCMP officer. However, it is his major contribution to the improvement of the Hull sector of the current city of Gatineau that I would like to speak about today.

Oscar Duquette initiated two major projects: the Lac-des-Fées parkway and the large lighted cross that has been shining from the highest point of Columbia Park since 1950 and can be seen from most of the city.

Last Saturday, I had the honour of participating in a ceremony in memory of this great pioneer. Over 80 members of the Duquette family were in attendance. From now on, when we drive on Allumettières boulevard over the Lac-des-Fées parkway, we will be driving on the viaduct named in his memory.

Let us celebrate together the memory of Oscar Duquette and of all our great builders.

Long live the family of Oscar Duquette!

Violence Against Women
Statements By Members

November 26th, 2010 / 11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Andrew Saxton North Vancouver, BC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to speak about an important initiative to end violence against women. As we all know, ending violence against women requires a co-operative approach involving governments of all levels, community groups and individuals.

The invitation to men to be part of the solution is essential and should be commended. Take, for example, the Ending Violence Association of B.C., a community group that recently engaged in an educational initiative and a subsequent video entitled Men Speak Up: Ending Violence Together.

This initiative aimed to change attitudes that condone behaviours related to violence against women and to provide men with tangible skills and information to talk with their peers about violence against women. Six hundred and sixteen participants were trained or engaged, and EVA B.C. should be applauded for its efforts.

This is just one of the many examples of men becoming part of the solution, demonstrating strength and standing up for something as critical as ending violence against women.