House of Commons Hansard #108 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was farmers.

Topics

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, as I have said in the House, our men and women in uniform and our civilians have performed admirably well and with honour in Afghanistan.

We detain only those individuals who attack or pose a credible threat to those people who are working in Afghanistan.

We transfer to Afghan partners in line with our international obligations. We monitor that transfer. I indicated yesterday that we have done close to 280 visits. These visits are done on a random basis.

First Nations
Oral Questions

December 1st, 2010 / 2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Marc Lemay Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, although first nations communities are growing rapidly and education needs are critical, the federal government has been maintaining the 2% cap on education funding applied in 1996. The Bloc Québécois introduced Bill C-599 so that the Conservative government would work with first nations communities to develop an education funding plan that takes into account the needs of those communities.

Does the government recognize that its investments in education do not correspond to the needs of the first nations?

First Nations
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, we recognize the bill tabled by the Bloc member today. We have no idea when or if it will be debated in this place.

The government does understand the importance of education for first nations. We are committed to improving it in partnership with first nations, the provinces and the territories.

Since 2006 we have invested over $700 million in more than 100 school projects, with another 100 under way. We launched the education partnership program and the first nations student success program. Most of this is over and above—

First Nations
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Abitibi—Témiscamingue.

First Nations
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Marc Lemay Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, with unanimous consent, this bill could be passed very quickly.

By signing the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the Canadian government has recognized that these people have a right to better education. This recognition is not merely symbolic; the government must take action and must make massive investments to give first nations access to quality education.

Will the government finally take action?

First Nations
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, we have done more than our share on first nations education. We are working in tripartite arrangements. We are working to improve K to 12. We are working on post-secondary education. We came to an agreement on First Nations University of Canada.

We are doing everything we can to ensure better educational outcomes.

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

John McCallum Markham—Unionville, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Parliamentary Budget Officer will soon be publishing an update on the infrastructure stimulus fund. He will probably confirm that a good number of projects are in jeopardy across the country. Recreational facilities in communities such as Sainte-Marie and Trois-Pistoles are at risk, as well as the Pat Burns arena, announced by the Prime Minister himself.

When will this government finally announce the across-the-board extension of its arbitrary deadline?

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon
B.C.

Conservative

Chuck Strahl Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I saw the newspaper report as well. We are looking forward to the Parliamentary Budget Officer's report. I am sure it is going to show that over 92% of these projects are going to get completed by March 31. That is already a given. Ninety-two per cent is an A+.

In addition to that, the Federation of Canadian Municipalities has said this has created tens of thousands of jobs. Where would we be without that? It has contributed to more than 430,000 net new jobs for Canadians.

I will be announcing very soon how we are going to deal with that March 31 deadline, because we are going to be fair, reasonable and flexible.

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

John McCallum Markham—Unionville, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government keeps telling us to wait and see. Owen Sound's arena will only be 50% done in March and the City of Ottawa will be on the hook for millions of dollars in roadwork.

If the minister is so fair and flexible, then why are his Conservative members in the transport committee filibustering a Liberal motion to extend the deadline? That is not fair. It is obstruction and it is all about jobs. Why will they not extend the deadline?

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon
B.C.

Conservative

Chuck Strahl Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, it is an interesting approach by the member. First, he says that the infrastructure stimulus was just a bad idea. Then he says that it was a good idea, but it just was not done right. Now he says that it is creating so many dang jobs that we have to get it and extend it. Here we go again.

The Conference Board of Canada says that in Ontario alone the increased infrastructure spending preserved about 70,000 jobs in the province last year.

We are getting the job done and we are working closely with the province and with proponents. Now that we have the data in place, we will be able to show how fair, reasonable and flexible we will be. I will make an announcement very soon.

HIV-AIDS
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, 16,000 people will die of AIDS today because they do not have access to medication. The NDP's bill to amend the Patent Act would have solved the problem, but the Conservatives and the Liberals removed the clause that would have enabled generic drug producers to supply all developing countries under a single licence.

Why refuse to help people dying of AIDS?

HIV-AIDS
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, Canada will be the next country to provide over $1 billion to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Canada will double its international aid to $5 billion for 2010-11 and will support important initiatives, such as the Canadian international immunization initiative and the AIDS initiative.

That is our record. We are here to do good things that actually make a difference. Unfortunately the NDP bill would do nothing to do that.

HIV-AIDS
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Brian Masse Windsor West, ON

Mr. Speaker, today, on World AIDS Day, more than 16,000 men, women and children will die in the developing world because they cannot get affordable generic drugs. New Democrats have introduced a bill to get the antiviral drugs to five million people who desperately need them. The brand name drug companies only have 2% of the African market, so right now their profits will not be impacted by the bill.

The government needs to decide if it is more interested in saving lives or protecting the brand name drug profits. Which is it?

HIV-AIDS
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, as I mentioned already, Canada is at the forefront of assisting those who are in need. In fact, in many cases, we have doubled our efforts under this government.

However, the changes proposed by the NDP will do nothing to address the issues of access to medicine. In fact, what they do is revoke intellectual property rights and remove important steps in ensuring the safety and efficacy of the drugs being exported.

We are for action that actually works. That is what we have done and that is what we will continue to do.

Product Safety
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Tilly O'Neill-Gordon Miramichi, NB

Mr. Speaker, the hon. Minister of Health announced amendments to the cribs and cradles regulations of the Hazardous Products Act. Canada's requirements are among the most stringent in the world. How will the amendments further strengthen these safety requirements?