House of Commons Hansard #110 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was offence.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Mario Laframboise Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel, QC

Mr. Speaker, recently, the Canadian Council of Chief Executives was urging the Conservative government to stop following in the wake of the United States and to develop a consistent policy to address climate change. These 150 business leaders want to move forward on environmental and energy innovation.

Now that the Cancun conference is under way, why does the government not make amends and table a coherent plan to fight global warming? What is the government waiting for?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, we have a plan to reduce greenhouse gases. In Cancun, we will work with the other countries to encourage the world's major economies to participate in reducing greenhouse gases. We have already established regulations on automobile emissions and we want to do the same for emissions from trains, planes and ships. We will continue to work with the other countries to this end. We agreed to reduce our greenhouse gases by 17%, which is exactly the same objective as that set by President Barack Obama.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Mario Laframboise Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel, QC

Mr. Speaker, here is a concrete example of how the economy and the environment go hand in hand: Enerkem is producing a new type of ethanol using old utility poles. The company claims that its growth is constrained by the lack of federal regulations promoting clean energy and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. According to the company's vice-president, the government's inaction will detract from Canada's ability to compete, particularly with the United States.

Do the Conservatives understand that entire sectors of Quebec's economy are suffering because they sided with the oil companies?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, it is our government that created the regulations to add biofuels to gasoline, which was something very important.

We are world leaders. We have put biofuel regulations in place and that is leading to a huge amount of economic development and growth. We know that the environment can be a huge enabler of a growing economy.

We are very pleased today that there were 15,000 net new jobs created in this country. That is more than one more step forward. We remain focused on jobs and the economy.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, Ambassador Crosbie's comments about the situation in Afghanistan stand in stark contrast to the rosy views of the Conservatives. He referred to mass corruption, election fraud, narcotics trafficking and a system of patronage that should make even the Conservatives blush. On the Afghan election our ambassador said, “We can't be seen to collude with it”.

Does the Minister of Foreign Affairs still stand by his endorsement of that election which his own ambassador said was rigged?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the primary responsibility obviously of Canada's ambassadors and high commissioners is to represent Canada. Ambassador Crosbie does not represent the Government of Afghanistan. He represents the Government of Canada. Our government has been, and will continue to be, outspoken about certain of our concerns related to governance in Afghanistan.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canada's Ambassador to Afghanistan has been quoted as saying:

“The international community must stand up for the silent majority or be blamed for letting Karzai and his family establish across the country the system of patronage and control that exists in Kandahar.”

Are the Conservatives going to continue to help the Karzai family get rich on the backs of the people of Afghanistan?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I will repeat what I said a few moments ago. The responsibility of our ambassadors and our high commissioners around the world is to represent Canada's interests abroad. They are not ambassadors of one country or another, they are ambassadors who represent our interests.

With respect to the comments that have been made, I will just say that our government continues to be outspoken about a number of our concerns and will continue to do so, especially when it comes to Afghanistan.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, those are empty words coming from the government. It has to back the assessment of the ambassador. It is not doing that. The ambassador described Mr. Karzai's chief of staff as a “corrupt, Iranian-backed éminence grise whose influence appears to increase daily”. This is a man who has been accepting bags of money from the Iranians at a time when Afghans desperately need help.

Why are the Conservatives cutting back on the kind of assistance that Afghanistan would be able to use to counter corruption?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the hon. colleague who sits on the committee that reviews the quarterly reports will know full well that among the six objectives and priorities we have, one indeed is to take care of institution building. Obviously the member did not read that report and he does not know what we are doing in Afghanistan. He might start reading the report.

Census
Oral Questions

December 3rd, 2010 / 11:25 a.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, a year ago a briefing note was prepared for Industry Canada detailing the concerns of numerous federal departments. Replacing the mandatory long form census with a voluntary survey would significantly compromise their ability to develop and evaluate public policy relevant to issues like EI, aboriginal health, housing, education, as well as the settling of immigrants.

Despite this crystal clear advice, the Prime Minister decided unilaterally to press ahead. When will the government do the right thing and restore the mandatory long form census?

Census
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, unlike the Liberals and their coalition partners, we do not believe it is fair or reasonable to threaten Canadians with jail time or massive fines, or both of these, to fill out a long form for those who want the data. We have a fair and reasonable compromise which acquires useful and usable data, and at the same time better protects the rights and interests of citizens.

I just wonder what hidden interest the coalition has on that side and why they want to trample on Canadians' rights.

Census
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government picks the questions and picks the penalties, but cutting the long form census is just reckless spending and reckless policy. In what the government describes as tough economic times, how do Conservatives find it prudent to spend $30 million more to get less reliable information?

Why will the Minister of Finance not discipline the Minister of Industry, get this risky spending under control, do the right thing and restore the long form census?

Census
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, it is very regrettable that the Liberal Party and its coalition partners are so unfair and unbalanced on this particular issue.

We have a fair and reasonable balanced objective here. We want to protect the rights of Canadians. We do not want to threaten them with jail time or massive fines, or both.

We think we have a reasonable solution. It is just unfortunate that those members are concentrating on this issue when we got 15,000 net new jobs in November. That is what Canadians care about.

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, last Friday, 900 beef and hog farmers attended an urgent meeting in Stratford entitled “Farmers Matter”. Farmer after farmer stated that the government's farm safety nets are not working. Farmers made it clear that they cannot pay back the targeted advance loans under the terms the minister announced.

Why does the government impose loans on farmers while wasting billions of dollars elsewhere: waste on fancy photo ops, waste on cabinet ministers' expenses, waste on planes and prisons? Do farmers just not matter to this government?