House of Commons Hansard #110 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was child.

Topics

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, the U.S. has enacted the Bioterrorism Act to protect that country's drinking water systems from terrorist attack. The act requires water utilities to conduct assessments of their vulnerability to attack.

A British security expert has confirmed that Canada's drinking water systems are not protected from the threat of attack. What is more, the RCMP lacks the money to apply the suspicious incident reporting system to the water sector.

Why has the government fallen down on such a vital issue?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, obviously we take these issues incredibly seriously. This government has worked very hard with respect to combatting terrorism.

Domestically we have been fortunate that we have not had a major incident since Air India. Obviously, we want to ensure that the health and safety of Canadians are protected, not just in terms of setting high standards, but in terms of being concerned about what people might do to cause harm to Canadians.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would remind the minister that it has been almost a decade since 9/11. Since then, the U.S. has passed the Bioterrorism Act and the British have protected their entire drinking water network with sophisticated 21st century technology. Canadian municipalities, on the other hand, do not have safe water plans. Most have not even done risk assessments for their drinking water systems.

Does the government know which municipalities have protected their systems from terrorist attack, yes or no?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, this government has continued to follow the strong policies that the previous Liberal government followed from 2001 to 2006.

The Economy
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

Guy Lauzon Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians across the country are growing more and more concerned with the Liberal leader's plan to attack Canadian job creators with a punishing new tax increase that would kill jobs and kill economic growth. Experts have noted that the Liberal tax hike plan would kill over 400,000 new jobs, and people in my community are worried about the Liberal plan too.

The Cornwall and Area Chamber of Commerce has stated that it is gravely concerned, noting that it would have a negative impact on many of our local businesses.

Can the parliamentary secretary please update this House on our government's record on jobs and on taxes?

The Economy
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, my hon. friend is right. In fact, the Liberals want to dramatically hike taxes on job creators. It is a proven fact that it would kill almost 400,000 jobs in this country.

Our government is focused on keeping taxes low and creating jobs. November's job growth gains prove that, once again, our economic action plan is working, with five straight quarters of steady economic growth. Since July 2009, this country has created 440,000 net new jobs. That is good news.

Air Transportation
Oral Questions

December 3rd, 2010 / 11:40 a.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, this government is driving billions of dollars in business away from Canadian airports to the United States. The government is charging millions in rent and excessive security charges.

We can go to any American airport on the border, like Buffalo or Plattsburg, and find a parking lot full of Canadian licence plates. Millions of Canadians flew out of American airports last year. That is business that should have been going to Canadian airports.

Why will this government not help the Canadian aviation industry? Why is it content to drive away business from Canada to the United States?

Air Transportation
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Fort McMurray—Athabasca
Alberta

Conservative

Brian Jean Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, we know exactly what the NDP wants to do with this country. It wants to close our borders, shut down Canada and stop Canada's government from creating jobs. Airports are no different.

We have one of the most competitive airport industries in the world. As far as airports and the economy go, we are going to take no lessons from the NDP.

Let me be clear, Canada has created 441,000 new jobs over the past five straight quarters. Canada is one of the world leaders as far as economies go, and we are going to take no lessons from the NDP.

Air Transportation
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, I do not think those guys take lessons from anyone, but they should.

Our airports should not be used as cash cows. The government's taxes now account for up to 70% of the total fare. The Conservative government is taking $3 billion more out of airports than it is putting into them. Canadian travellers deserve better.

The government should be standing up for Canadian travellers, our local economies and our aviation industry. Instead, because of high taxes, levies and security charges, it is driving business south of the border.

Why does the government not get on board and help the Canadian aviation industry compete?

Air Transportation
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Yellowhead
Alberta

Conservative

Rob Merrifield Minister of State (Transport)

Mr. Speaker, the government is committed to ensuring that our airports stay viable and the industry continues to be that way. The industry has been deregulated at our airports from an economic point of view. The users should make certain that they have the appropriate airport security in place as they go through our airports and that the rents are appropriate so that the taxpayer is not overly burdened by this.

We have a system in place that is actually doing that and is in the best interests of the Canadian passenger and the public.

Census
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Richard Nadeau Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, when the government decided to make changes to the census, a number of departments expressed their concerns. In a memo addressed to the Deputy Minister of Industry, one of the main concerns was the possible confusion between the voluntary nature of the long form census and the mandatory nature of the short form census.

In light of this warning by his own officials, how could the Minister of Industry eliminate the mandatory long form unless he was trying to promote his ideology instead of science?

Census
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, as I have already said, we do not think it is appropriate to require Canadians to provide private information under the threat of sanctions. Our approach is balanced, reasonable and fair to all Canadians. We are acquiring very important information while protecting the rights of Canadians.

That is our position and we are proud of it.

Census
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Richard Nadeau Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, the minister should know that we cannot improve what we cannot measure.

Is the minister aware that eliminating the long form census will have harmful effects in a host of areas, such as transfer payments to the provinces, employment insurance, labour mobility, health programs, housing and economic development?

Census
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, that is absolutely not true. We are protecting the information that the departments need while respecting the privacy of Canadians.

The hon. member's leader, though, had another position. He wanted to take away people's passports or their EI if they did not fill out the census. That is not reasonable; that is not fair for Canadians. We will oppose the Liberal, Bloc and NDP coalition on this issue.

Canadian Forces
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Scott Simms Bonavista—Gander—Grand Falls—Windsor, NL

Mr. Speaker, yesterday Canada's military ombudsman revealed some disturbing facts.

Pierre Daigle has uncovered multiple cases where families of loved ones who have died while in the military have been unable or seemingly blocked from getting information about those deaths.

No doubt the Conservatives have known about this for months, if not years, and yet they did very little.

Why does it take a public shaming for this government to walk the talk when it comes to treating our veterans' and soldiers' families fairly?