House of Commons Hansard #35 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was investment.

Topics

Workplace Safety
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Maria Minna Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, today we mark the National Day of Mourning for those killed or injured in the workplace.

Can anyone imagine waking up in the morning, getting ready for work and asking oneself, “Is today the day I die at work?” This is the slogan for the Canadian Labour Congress' National Day of Mourning.

In 2008, over 1,000 people were killed in their workplace or from an occupational disease. Thousands more were injured to such an extent that they had to miss work. Most, if not all, of these accidents are preventable.

The government has a positive role to play in ensuring that our workplaces are safe and to enforce the law when employers are found in violation.

Today we remember those who have lost their lives or have been injured in the workplace. These people are ordinary Canadians who went to work, provided for their families and worked to make Canada a better place in which to live, work and play. This could be anyone, members of our family or neighbours.

All of us must do what we can to make our workplace even safer. I encourage all members of this House to work together in order to prevent any more of these tragic losses of life and injuries in the workplace.

National Day of Mourning
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Sylvie Boucher Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Government of Canada, I want to say that today we join with the families and workers who are mourning someone who lost their life on the job.

The best way to pay tribute to deceased workers is to step up efforts to make Canadian workplaces as healthy and safe as possible.

It was our government that brought forward tough regulations against workplace violence.

This spring and summer, we will focus on the safety of young workers to ensure that our sons and daughters understand their rights in the workplace and are confident enough to report hazardous working conditions.

My colleagues and I remember those who have lost their lives and reaffirm our collective commitment to ensure that all Canadians can return home safe and sound at the end of the work day.

National Day of Mourning
Statements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Following discussions among the representatives of all parties in the House, I believe there is agreement to observe a moment of silence to commemorate the National Day of Mourning and honour the memory of workers killed or injured on the job.

I now invite hon. members to rise.

[A moment of silence observed]

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, I hope I speak for everyone in this House when I salute your historic decision yesterday.

I would like to ask the Prime Minister if he will fully comply with your ruling yesterday, Mr. Speaker, and whether he will now work with us in good faith to do what we first proposed five months ago, which is to respect the authority of Parliament, deliver the documents and provide Canadians with the truth that they deserve.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, you have made a ruling. At the same time, as you know and as I think was recognized, the fact is that the government has certain obligations that are established under statutes passed by this Parliament.

We obviously want to proceed in a way that will respect both of those things and, of course, we will be open to any reasonable suggestions to achieve those two objectives.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, I still did not hear a clear answer to the question as to whether the government will comply with your ruling. My question is now about his understanding of that ruling.

Does the Prime Minister now understand that the ultimate decision to invoke national security to prevent the disclosure of documents rests with this House, with the elected representatives of the people, and not with the government?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, as I have said, we look forward to both complying with your ruling and with the legal obligations that have been established by statutes passed by this Parliament.

The fact is, the government cannot break the law, it cannot order public servants to break the law nor can it do anything that would unnecessarily jeopardize the safety of Canadian troops.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, this side of the House respects the need to protect national security and the operational security of our troops.

Will the Prime Minister and his government work together with us and respect the will of the House and your ruling in order to protect the safety of our troops? Furthermore, will they tell Canadians the truth?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, you have made a ruling. In the meantime, the government has certain legal obligations that are established under statutes passed by this House. We want to proceed in a way that will respect both of those things, and of course we will be very open to any reasonable suggestions.

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

April 28th, 2010 / 2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Lise Zarac LaSalle—Émard, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the National Assembly unanimously supported our position to maintain the consensus that has existed for 25 years. However, the Prime Minister wants to cut funding to NGOs that support African women's right to choose, even if they have been raped. We know that systematic rape is used as a weapon of war in many African conflicts.

How can we claim to defend maternal health while taking away the right of African women who have been raped to control their bodies?

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Kootenay—Columbia
B.C.

Conservative

Jim Abbott Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, I would like to read from a news release from organizations that are trying to work with us on this issue. They say:

It's time to focus on the hope and opportunity that this G8 Initiative on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health presents and end the suffering of millions of families around the world. It's time to commit significant and new investments to meet this need. It's time to measure success in lives saved, not political points scored.

That is from the CEOs of World Vision, UNICEF, Results Canada, CARE Canada, Plan Canada and Save the Children.

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Lise Zarac LaSalle—Émard, QC

Mr. Speaker, we could save 70,000 lives per year.

The Minister for La Francophonie says that the WHO does not talk about abortion. That is absolutely false. The WHO agrees with the Canadian position of the past 25 years. This government is tampering with the Canadian position to satisfy the ultra-religious lobby. This is a step backwards straight into the Duplessis era. Women, and not the Prime Minister, must control their bodies.

What right does the Prime Minister have to interfere in the medical decisions of African women?

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Kootenay—Columbia
B.C.

Conservative

Jim Abbott Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, what I find terribly sad is the fact that the member and the entire opposition are trying to make an issue that simply does not exist.

I have already read the statements of people who are trying to work with our government. Let me remind her who they are: the CEOs of World Vision, UNICEF, Results Canada, CARE Canada, Plan Canada and Save the Children.

I will take their counsel, not hers.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday's Speaker's ruling about the Afghan detainee documents could also apply to the government's attitude in general. When dealing with various issues, the Conservative government has lacked transparency, exhibited ideological stubbornness and scorned democracy. The right of women in developing countries to have abortions and the Rahim Jaffer affair are just the latest examples of that.

Now that the Speaker of the House has given him a slap on the wrist, will the Prime Minister acknowledge that he is in the minority and stop trying to impose his backward ideology at all costs?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, with respect to the maternal and child health initiative to save the lives of mothers and women around the world, our position respects the vote in the House of Commons.