House of Commons Hansard #51 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was oil.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Langley
B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I always find it interesting when a member of the Liberal Party, that for 13 years did nothing on the environment, is now asking questions on the environment, particularly water and particularly that member, who voted against what we are doing with the good funding in our budget to help clean up the mess that the previous Liberal government created.

Our government has a strong comprehensive plan to ensure clean water for all Canadians. We have a good plan and the Liberals need to get on board.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Bloc

Meili Faille Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, according to Marjorie Villefranche of the Maison d'Haïti community centre, some 2,000 family class applications were being processed before the earthquake. Since then, 2,000 to 3,000 new applications have been submitted. According to the department, as of May 15, only 525 visas have been granted since the January 12 earthquake.

Will the minister stop dragging his feet and instruct his department to speed up processing for family class applications?

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

St. Catharines
Ontario

Conservative

Rick Dykstra Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, the last thing this government and this minister have done is foot-dragged on this issue.

We have now taken action on nearly half of pre-earthquake family applicants, which is 1,837 within the family class. We have now completed more than half of the applications, 62% of spousal and 63% of dependent children.

We are working. It is not easy. It is tough. It is hard sliding. But we are doing the job on behalf of the people of this country in Haiti.

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

John Rafferty Thunder Bay—Rainy River, ON

Mr. Speaker, the forestry sector has seen more than 70,000 job losses under the current government's watch, the latest at AbitibiBowater in Gatineau.

In this year's budget, the government has offered just $25 million in new money to the $70-billion forestry sector. Coming from northwestern Ontario, how can the government spend $75 million an hour for security at G8 but just $25 million a year to help Canada's forestry sector?

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, since coming to power, we have made extraordinary progress in the forestry sector. Our first step was to resolve the softwood lumber crisis by signing an agreement that gave our forestry producers nearly $1 billion. We also made strategic, targeted investments because we know that the main issue is finding markets.

The Forest Products Association of Canada submitted its BioPathways program, and we will be investing $100 million in that program over the next four years to strengthen conventional sawmills and maximize use of bioproducts. That is what I call action and leadership.

Fisheries
Oral Questions

May 28th, 2010 / noon

Conservative

Scott Armstrong Cumberland—Colchester—Musquodoboit Valley, NS

Mr. Speaker, Canadians care deeply about the future of the Atlantic bluefin tuna and our government shares the concerns of experts around the world about the conservation of this important species.

Could the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans please inform this House about the most recent development on this important file, on which Canada continues to show international leadership?

Fisheries
Oral Questions

Noon

Egmont
P.E.I.

Conservative

Gail Shea Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian bluefin tuna fishery is a model of sustainability for the world. At meetings in Doha, in March, the world was put on notice that the time for talk was over and urgent action was needed now to protect this species.

At international meetings next week, our government will continue to show leadership on this file and press our international tuna fishing partners to follow the example of Canadian fishers, who strictly adhere to sustainable fishing practices and protect the future of this fishery.

Government Response to Petitions
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8) I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to 15 petitions.

Caffeinated Beverages
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

Noon

NDP

Jim Maloway Elmwood—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, I have two petitions to present today.

The first petition is signed by dozens of Canadians. It is a call for Health Canada to reverse its authorization to allow caffeine in all soft drinks. Health Canada announced on March 19, 2010 that beverage companies will now be allowed to add up to 75% of the caffeine allowed in the most highly caffeinated colas to all soft drinks.

Soft drinks have been designed and marketed toward children for generations. Canadians already have concerns about children drinking coffee and colas because they acknowledge that caffeine is an addictive stimulant. It is difficult enough for parents to control the amount of sugar, artificial sweeteners and other additives that their children consume, including caffeine from colas.

The petitioners call upon the Government of Canada to reverse Health Canada's new rule allowing caffeine in all soft drinks and not to follow the deregulation policies of the United States and other countries at the sacrifice of the health of Canadian children and pregnant women.

Air Passengers' Bill of Rights
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

Noon

NDP

Jim Maloway Elmwood—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, the second petition is also signed by dozens of Canadians. It is a call for Parliament to adopt Canada's first air passengers' bill of rights.

In only six months Barack Obama and his transportation secretary, Ray LaHood, have rocketed ahead of Canada by penalizing airlines $27,500 per passenger for tarmac delays of over three hours. LaHood recently charged Southwest Airlines $120,000 for overbooked flights.

A Canadian air passengers' bill of rights would compensate air passengers with all Canadian carriers anywhere they fly. The bill would provide compensation for overbooked flights, cancelled flights and long tarmac delays. It is about time that Parliament adopted Canada's first air passengers' bill of rights.

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the following questions will be answered today: Nos. 180 and 201.

Question No. 180
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Liberal

Hedy Fry Vancouver Centre, BC

With regard to the Community Access Program: (a) what were the expenditures of the program for fiscal year 2009-2010; and (b) what is the projected budget for fiscal year 2010-2011?

Question No. 180
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, with regard to the community access program:

Question No. 201
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Liberal

Geoff Regan Halifax West, NS

With respect to changes to the Public Service Employment Regulations announced by the President of the Public Service Commission, Maria Barrados, in December 2008 that would give spouses of Canada’s military, reservists, RCMP and public servants who are killed in the line of duty appointment priority in the federal public service, when does the government intend to implement these measures?

Question No. 201
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, the proposed priority provision would grant an appointment priority into the federal public service to the spouse or common-law partner of employees of the public service and members of the Canadian Forces and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police whose death is attributable to the performance of duties. This priority would be retroactive to October 7, 2001, the date on which Canada and a coalition of other countries initiated military actions in Afghanistan.

The amendments to the Public Service Employment Regulations, which include the priority provision, were pre-published in part I of the Canada Gazette on December 5, 2009. Revisions were made to the regulations as a result of pre-publication.

The Public Service Commission received the finalized version of the amendments to the regulations from the Department of Justice on April 15, 2010. The commission approved the regulations on April 22, 2010, and they were registered and published in part II of the Canada Gazette on May 12, 2010. The provision regarding the spousal priority came into force on that date, retroactive to October 12, 2001.