House of Commons Hansard #51 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was libraries.

Topics

Forest Fires
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, we are aware of the situation. Our officials have been working with the first nation and with the province that is primarily responsible for the evacuations that are necessary and for the work that will be done. We will do everything we can to help in this circumstance.

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Guy André Berthier—Maskinongé, QC

Mr. Speaker, last week, Kruger announced that it was laying off 440 workers in Trois-Rivières. Even though the forestry industry has to deal with interest rates that can reach 25%, the Conservative government refuses to offer loan guarantees.

How can the government claim that its programs are working, when job losses are piling up in the forestry industry?

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière
Québec

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and to the Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, our Conservative government is supporting and will continue to support the key sectors of our economy. The Minister of State for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec joined Nathalie Normandeau, Deputy Premier of Quebec, Minister of Natural Resources and Wildlife and Minister responsible for the Northern Plan, and Serge Simard, Minister for Natural Resources and Wildlife, in announcing $110 million in support measures for 2010-11 to solidify the recovery and to support the transformation of the sector.

Sydney Harbour
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Mark Eyking Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Prime Minister.

Last Thursday in Cape Breton, Sydney celebrated Ports Day. The main topic was the dredging of Sydney harbour, which will be key to Cape Breton's future. What was missing that day was the announcement for federal funding for the dredging.

The extended deadline is today. Will the Prime Minister commit his government to funding the dredging of Sydney harbour so the community has an opportunity to grow and prosper?

Sydney Harbour
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, what is not missing are millions of dollars that have been committed to Cape Breton by the government over the last four years, most of which the member voted against; for example, the infrastructure stimulus fund, $175 million to support marine Atlantic revitalization; money through the gas tax; and projects through CAF and RInC.

These are incredible projects for Cape Breton, all of which the member voted against. He is shaking his head. I can hear it rattling from here, but it is a fact.

Sydney Harbour
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Mark Eyking Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, how come this minister, who is responsible for Nova Scotia, does not come across the Causeway enough? He should get down there. He should be there today announcing this much needed money instead of spending his time in the House.

I will continue to fight for the people of Cape Breton. He should be responsible for the people of Nova Scotia. He should get down there and make that announcement so Cape Breton can move ahead.

Sydney Harbour
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the hon. member's canned rage, but he has been missing in action. When he was a member of the government for 13 years, we heard nothing but stunning silence from this member on the Sydney dredge. It was like crickets when it came to the member raising this issue around the Sydney dredge.

In the meantime, we as a government on the Conservative side have invested millions and millions of dollars.

I get to Cape Breton regularly. I love Cape Breton. I even love Rita's Tea Room.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, next week in Alberta a provincial hearing will begin into an oil sands upgrader in Upgrader Alley. The project will destroy fish habitat and cause acid deposition in the national park, yet despite public requests, no federal environmental assessment has been required and no federal officials are attending the hearing.

How does the minister defend his failure to ensure a review before an irrevocable decision is made to ensure timely and meaningful public participation, and to provide a coordinated environmental assessment, all required by law?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Langley
B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the member knows this government is committed to first-class environmental assessment regulations. Her party has been voting against improving environmental assessments. The existing system duplicates assessments. It is expensive and frustrates major projects in the country without enhancing environmental outcomes.

Why would she be opposed to improving environmental assessments?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, that is why there is a coordinated review, except one of the partners is missing in action.

The government constantly touts its policy of following in the footsteps of the United States on energy and environmental policies and standards. Given this, will the government today commit to upgrade Canadian laws governing oil and gas leases to at least provide the same public rights to scrutinize the process and require environmental assessment as provided in U.S. law, and not in Canadian law? Will it follow the path forged by President Obama to seize that control and responsibility to regulate these risky oil and gas--

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. parliamentary secretary.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Langley
B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the member does know that this government is committed to an environmental assessment that is improved. We have a harmonized continental approach with the Obama administration, but she is opposed to that.

Why would she be opposed to what President Calderón said is good Canadian leadership on the environment? Why would she oppose that?

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

May 28th, 2010 / 11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Scott Reid Lanark—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington, ON

Mr. Speaker, the public safety committee heard yesterday from a front line policeman who stated that the long gun registry “represents the largest and most contentious single waste of taxpayers' dollars and that it can do nothing to prevent criminals from obtaining firearms”. Our Conservative government continues to stand with rural Canadians and against the unfair targeting of law-abiding gun owners.

Would the parliamentary secretary please tell the House why NDP and Liberal MPs should listen to their constituents rather than their party whips before voting on Bill C-391?

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, we do not agree with the Liberal leader's smoke and mirror unconstitutional proposals or that law-abiding gun owners should be criminalized. On this side we stand with rural Canadians, front line police officers like Murray Grismer, and the justice ministers from Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Yukon, all of whom remain firmly opposed to the long gun registry.

I urge all NDP and Liberal members who voted for Bill C-391 at second reading to listen to their constituents and not allow their vote to be determined by the Liberal leader.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, as we speak, the Canadian Foundation for Climate and Atmospheric Sciences is hosting a symposium here in Ottawa on water security in Canada.

The government has not renewed the foundation's funding, with the result that the foundation's research into the impact of climate change on water will come to an abrupt stop at the end of the year.

Why does the government seem unable to realize that the foundation's research is vital to the future of water management in Canada and will help the western provinces in particular to better understand the increasingly serious droughts they will be experiencing?