House of Commons Hansard #39 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was lobbying.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, we have strong environmental laws to protect our air, water and soil. The National Energy Board and this government would only allow any resource extraction projects to go forward if there were strong environmental protections.

I want to indicate very directly for the leader of the NDP that this government has no plans and no intention to reduce the environmental standards in this regard.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, the legislation before us in the 2010 budget strips the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency of its capacity to do its job to protect our environment and turns that job over to the industry friendly National Energy Board. That decision could have very dangerous consequences. In fact, we are witnessing the consequences of that very kind of deregulation right now in the gulf.

We know the oil industry is lobbying the ministers of the government to lower safety standards and we know the Conservatives are listening. Will the government reconsider its decision and maintain the integrity of environmental assessments?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are custodians to one of the most pristine natural environments in the world in our far Arctic. This government gives great priority to that file, which is why, just in this Parliament alone, we extended the environmental laws in our transportation sector to an additional 100 nautical miles offshore. We accord it a great priority.

This government has established whale sanctuaries in our far north and have quadrupled the size of Nahanni National Park.

We have no intention whatsoever of reducing environmental protections in the Beaufort Sea.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, the oil that is gushing out of the BP damaged rig is killing wildlife throughout the gulf and destroying the marine ecosystem. It is now hitting the coast of Louisiana and Florida will be next. The oil will keep pouring out for days, maybe even weeks. It is about to enter the gulf stream, which means that the Canadian Atlantic coastline could ultimately be at risk.

Will the government tell us what it is doing to assess that risk and put plans in place to ensure that Canada's coastlines and our marine preserves are protected?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I think all Canadians are disturbed about what they see going on in southeastern United States in the Gulf of Mexico. It is an environmental tragedy.

The Government of Canada's job is to focus on ensuring those types of disasters do not happen in Canada. We have strong environmental protections. We have absolutely no intention of changing or weakening any of these important environmental protections in the far north.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Ujjal Dosanjh Vancouver South, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians look at the environmental horror threatening the Gulf of Mexico and recognize how vigilant we need to be to protect our own coastal regions from a similar fate. They know that the Conservatives, including the Prime Minister, have campaigned for years to abandon the nearly 40-year moratorium on tanker traffic and drilling off B.C.'s coast.

Given the environmental sensitivity of these waters, will the Conservatives acknowledge that they were wrong and finally drop their calls to abandon the moratorium?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, back in 1988, an exclusion zone was established between the various American interests and the Government of Canada that does not allow tankers carrying crude from Alaska to go to the United States either through the strait on our west coast or through Canadian waters. It must be at least 25 to 85 miles. The member for Vancouver South should know that the government has no intention of revisiting this issue.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Ujjal Dosanjh Vancouver South, BC

Mr. Speaker, that is not very reassuring since we know that just a few years ago the former minister of natural resources, the member for Saanich—Gulf Islands, was denying that there was even a moratorium on tanker traffic in those waters.

These are environmentally sensitive areas prone to seismic activity and important to our tourism and fisheries in British Columbia.

What concrete steps is the government taking to ensure that the west coast moratorium on offshore drilling and tanker traffic will remain in place?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I cannot be any clearer than I was when I stated that the government has no intention to revisit the 1988 deal with respect to tanker traffic. We have no intention of making any changes. I think it serves Canada very well and serves our environment well.

Nuclear Energy
Oral Questions

May 4th, 2010 / 2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative culture of deceit is so ingrained that the Conservatives are hiding their plans for AECL. Everyone in the sector knows that the government is planning to sell our world-class CANDU technology outright. That will have devastating consequences and cost thousands of jobs.

Why is the minister not doing anything to prevent the death of an industry? Why can he not just tell us the truth?

Nuclear Energy
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands
Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, the member should probably be doing his job a little bit more carefully rather than reading the newspapers in the morning. He knows full well that last September we announced a key step in the restructuring process and that we would be taking proposals from investors.

We said at the time that we were open to arrange investment options up to and including 100%. He knows that and he knows that we are moving ahead.

He also knows, from testimony that we heard at committee, that AECL needs this new investment to be able to compete around the world.

Nuclear Energy
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Halifax West, NS

Nonsense, Mr. Speaker. It emphasized a P3 proposal.

Stakeholders who have been briefed by investment bankers brokering this backroom deal were told that the government's intent is to unload the entire CANDU sector.

It is the Avro Arrow all over again and the death knell for this industry.

Now we are hearing reports of former PMO staffers going to work for foreign nuclear firms.

Is the government trying to hide the fact that at the same time as it is destroying this industry, Conservative cronies are about to cash in?

Nuclear Energy
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands
Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, the member knows full well that there is a five year ban on lobbying for PMO staff.

More important, on the issue of AECL he also knows that it needs new investment if it is to continue to be competitive around the world. Would he rather lose all of the jobs in Canada by not making a move on this?

He knows full well that we need investment, that we need to restructure and that is what the government is prepared to do. His government did not have either the leadership or the guts to do that when it needed to be done in the first place.

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Maria Mourani Ahuntsic, QC

Mr. Speaker, although they claim to be the law and order government, the Conservatives are encouraging gun owners to violate the Criminal Code and for four years have been renewing the amnesty for those who refuse to register their guns. According to police, the registry is a valuable tool in the fight against crime.

How can the government claim to enforce law and order, when it favours the free circulation of firearms and civil disobedience?

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, while we support the licensing and registration of prohibited weapons, we do not support the wasteful long gun registry. It is time to end the criminalization of lawful hunters and outdoor enthusiasts once and for all.

Police Chief Hanson from Calgary has called the long gun registry a placebo and says that it creates a false sense of security.

We hope that those MPs who have voted to retain the long gun registry will change their minds rather than following the latest order of the Liberal leader.