House of Commons Hansard #39 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was lobbying.

Topics

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Maria Mourani Ahuntsic, QC

Mr. Speaker, Quebeckers unanimously support gun control. Along with the CLC and the Dawson College Gun Control Committee, who are here on Parliament Hill today, the National Assembly of Quebec, police forces, women's groups, advocacy groups for victims of crime, legal experts and public health experts all want the gun registry to be maintained as it is.

When will the government realize that its ideological obstinacy is jeopardizing the safety of Quebeckers?

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, let us hear what a chief of police said. Police Chief Hanson, speaking about the long gun registry, said, “I do not think it has worked all that well“. He stated, “The gun registry sure as heck did not help because those were all illegal weapons in the hands of criminals who have no intention of following the rules”.

Why does the member want to criminalize lawful hunting and outdoor enthusiasts? Why not focus on the actual criminals? Why would that party not support our initiatives against pedophiles and stronger sentences for pedophiles?

Official Languages
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Richard Nadeau Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, this government's attitude regarding the bilingualism of judges is very telling. They are prepared to accommodate a facade of bilingualism, but when it comes to using French where it counts, such as in our highest court, all of Canada has to be persuaded and too bad if francophones like Michel Doucet have to argue their cases before unilingual judges who are at the mercy of the limitations of translation.

Why does the government refuse to recognize the right to be heard and to express oneself in French?

Official Languages
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I am quite surprised by the Bloc's attack now on the Supreme Court of Canada. That institution has worked very well over the years and has been very respectful of both linguistic dualities within Canada. The government, in terms of the people we appoint, is guided by the principles of merit and legal excellence. I am not quite sure why that should be such a big problem with the Bloc.

Official Languages
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Richard Nadeau Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives' argument that a bilingualism requirement could impede the careers of unilingual francophone judges simply does not hold water. Since its inception, the Supreme Court has not seen very many unilingual francophone judges.

The government is being totally ridiculous by claiming that competence must take precedence over bilingualism. Is the government trying to say that it would be impossible to find six judges who are both bilingual and competent outside of Quebec?

Official Languages
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, in one sense the member recognizes the importance of the Supreme Court of Canada, but again I am disappointed on the attack on the judiciary. Usually the Bloc members are attacking our attempts to get tough on crime in this country. Who is next on their list? Will it be the police tomorrow? Is the Bloc going to be attacking them?

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Beauséjour, NB

Mr. Speaker, the Conflict of Interest Act prohibits a public office holder from using their position to promote the interests of a friend. We know that at least seven Conservative ministers gave their friend Rahim Jaffer privileged access. They bent over backwards to put Rahim's projects on a fast-track to government subsidies.

Will the minister admit that he and his colleagues violated the Conflict of Interest Act?

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, let me say two things. One is that Mr. Jaffer received no government funds as a result of any meetings or any mail that was sent in to the government. I say to the member opposite, who is the justice critic of the Liberal Party and would present himself as a future justice minister, if he has any evidence as a lawyer to suggest that anyone has violated the important Federal Accountability Act, the tough ethics legislation passed by this government, he should forward it on to the appropriate authorities and follow the example of the high ethical standards of the Prime Minister.

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Beauséjour, NB

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives are quick to pay lip service to accountability except when their own get caught violating the rules.

Chapter 9 of the Statutes of Canada, 2006 is very clear. It is illegal to give preferential treatment to friends regardless of whether government money actually changes hands. Given that compliance with this act is a precondition to appointment, will the minister perhaps explain what consequences will face those who violate the federal conflict of interest act?

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I guess the Liberal Party would have us get rid of an independent Commissioner of Lobbying, an independent Ethics Commissioner to make these adjudications. We will just send everything to the member for Beauséjour.

Regional Development
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Alexandra Mendes Brossard—La Prairie, QC

Mr. Speaker, in all regions of Quebec, the local decision-makers, like Mayor Meilleur in Mirabel, are telling us how important the regional development agencies are. That is as true in Quebec as it is in the Maritimes.

But according to the Prime Minister, these agencies provide social assistance. So, when the time comes to slash the budget in order to pay down their deficit, the Conservatives are taking it out on regional agencies.

When their own incompetence catches up to them, they send the bill to the regions. When will the Prime Minister understand the needs of the regions?

Regional Development
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean
Québec

Conservative

Denis Lebel Minister of State (Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec)

Mr. Speaker, like several other departments and agencies, our agency is currently undergoing a strategic review of its programs. So it is normal that we are looking at the sound management of Canadians' money. We have committed to paying down the deficit, and must ensure that government programs are efficient and effective, and that they produce the desired results for Canadians.

Last week, I had the pleasure of announcing a $100 million program to support communities. We are doing our job.

Regional Development
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Sukh Dhaliwal Newton—North Delta, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has always spoken of dismantling the regional economic development agencies. With yesterday's selective spending announcement, he is making his vendetta a reality. In two years from now, the western economic diversification budget will be half of what it was under the Liberal government.

Why is the government willing to let western economic diversification die?

Regional Development
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Blackstrap
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Lynne Yelich Minister of State (Western Economic Diversification)

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for his question and his renewed interest in the west. It has been over 11 months since he has asked about the west.

In that 11 months we have invested in over 718 RInC projects and 241 CAP projects. Over 7,700 jobs have been created in the west through our economic action plan.

While the member gets up to speed, we are delivering results for the west.

Justice
Oral Questions

May 4th, 2010 / 2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Ed Fast Abbotsford, BC

Mr. Speaker, our government believes that the justice system should put the rights of victims and law-abiding citizens ahead of the rights of criminals.

Yesterday we introduced legislation to establish mandatory jail time for fraud over $1 million to ensure that the voices of victims are heard when white collar criminals are sentenced.

Can the Minister of Justice please update the House on our Conservative government's efforts to listen and respond to the cries of victims and their families?