House of Commons Hansard #56 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was post.

Topics

Shipbuilding Industry
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Scott Simms Bonavista—Gander—Grand Falls—Windsor, NL

Mr. Speaker, I am not sure which is the bigger farce: this or the fixed wing search and rescue. It is just becoming identified with no answers. It is a long-term answer that never seems to be coming.

Two years for the government to decide where to build the new ships. After that, we know next to nothing: joint supply ships, a four year wait and counting; steamboat for the industry minister paid for with G8 money, not delivered until after the summit. Priceless.

Can the government at least tell us, will it prioritize the building of the joint supply ships, which are so urgently needed in our coastal waters?

Shipbuilding Industry
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills
Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Minister of State and Chief Government Whip

Mr. Speaker, I find it quite rich that this is coming from the Liberals, who are known for the decade of darkness. They allowed the ships to rust. Airplanes were in a state where they could not fly. Vehicles were rusting out. There was no money to the military. The manpower went down. Yet they are talking about procurement policies?

To answer the specific question, in terms of the Arctic offshore patrol vessels, the project is now in definition stage and the project continues to advance to meet first delivery in 2015.

The Economy
Oral Questions

June 4th, 2010 / 11:40 a.m.

Conservative

Stephen Woodworth Kitchener Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the only economic policy the Liberals ever talk about is their plan to raise taxes. We now have independent confirmation that Liberal tax hikes would destroy 400,000 jobs. Canadians know lower taxes help create jobs.

That is why Canada's economic action plan is getting results. We have witnessed our plan fuel job creation and stronger economic growth.

Could the parliamentary secretary please inform the House about the latest news on the economic front?

The Economy
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for Kitchener Centre for his work in the House and for helping us deliver the economic action plan, of which we are seeing results.

Statistics Canada today announced that we have created over 24,000 new jobs in the country in the month of May, the fifth straight month in a row. That is 310,000 new jobs since July of last year.

Canada's economic action plan is working. It is leading the way in the G7. This is no time for the opposition to delay the implementation of our budget bill.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, for years, experts have questioned the government's estimates of how effective their climate change policies are. The evidence is in. Canada's climate change record is a disaster. In a report completed last month and hidden on the departmental website, Environment Canada admitted that emissions had been cut 10 times less than they were projected to be cut.

Despite a global consensus on the urgency of cutting greenhouse gases, Canada has no plan to substantially reduce greenhouse gases. When will the Conservatives join the rest of the world and actually get a plan tabled in the House?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Langley
B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, that question was asked about a half hour ago. Unfortunately, the member was not listening.

For the first time in Canada, under this government, greenhouse gas emissions have stabilized and they are going down. They went down 2.1%. Under the previous Liberal government, emissions went up 26% with the help of the NDP.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, that is what a recession will do. The government projected a 52 megatonne drop and we had a five megatonne drop.

At the same time, that report also talks about the way the Conservatives are misspending money. They have a $1.5 billion trust fund for clean air. That fund, this report notes, is for the provinces. There is no way of knowing how the money is going to be spent and what results are being achieved. We have another boondoggle on our hands.

When will the government get serious about climate change, set real targets for greenhouse gas reductions and ensure that policies are in place to get the—

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Langley
B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, what has the NDP proposed? Bill C-311, a publicity stunt on climate change, would drive Canada back into recession and isolate Canada internationally.

We are working with the Obama administration. We are working with our international partners. We are moving forward and are already seeing positive results. We have a cleaner environment, emissions are going down and we have more jobs in Canada. What do those members not understand about that?

Copyright
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Carole Lavallée Saint-Bruno—Saint-Hubert, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative bill, which is meant to protect copyright, is deeply disappointing to creators, who want to see a levy imposed on MP3 players. This levy is simply a recognition of the work done by artists.

How can the government justify granting compensation to artists for copies made on blank CDs but not for copies made on MP3 players?

Copyright
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, our bill is for artists, for consumers and for Canadian industries. This bill is against unemployment and for jobs. The goal of this bill is to offer protection to artists in order to increase their creativity in Canada.

Copyright
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Carole Lavallée Saint-Bruno—Saint-Hubert, QC

Mr. Speaker, there is no monetary compensation for artists in this bill. Sales of music CDs are in free fall and artists' revenues are slowly drying up. However, the appetite for music has not wavered and makers of MP3 players are still raking in huge profits. ADISQ, UDA, the Canadian Private Copying Collective and even the Union des consommateurs are calling for a levy on digital music players.

Why is the government denying creators their fair remuneration?

Copyright
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, as I indicated a moment ago, there are a lot of protections to help artists to ensure they can create and grow in out country. However, we will not impose on consumers a new tax on their iPods, their BlackBerrys, their computers, their television sets to finance the Bloc's plans. We want to help artists, but we also want to help consumers.

Oil and Gas Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Sukh Dhaliwal Newton—North Delta, BC

Mr. Speaker, for weeks we have asked clear questions on the tanker ban off the B.C. coast, but we have yet to get a clear answer from the government.

We ask this once more. Will the government continue to follow the 1972 tanker ban or will it risk damaging the pristine waters off our B.C. coast?

Oil and Gas Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Fort McMurray—Athabasca
Alberta

Conservative

Brian Jean Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, let us be clear. This government has no plans to reopen the exclusion zone on tankers travelling between Alaska and Washington state. Under this long-standing agreement, U.S. tanker ships are not allowed within 25 miles, at the minimum, of the B.C. coast. In 22 years we have had no issues of non-compliance.