House of Commons Hansard #29 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was taxes.

Topics

Champlain Bridge
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, first, I would like to thank the hon. member because it was his idea to have a toll system. He said, “In terms of tolls, it's still to be seen. Like we've always said, we're open.” He also said, “With regard to the Champlain Bridge's replacement, we're not dismissing the idea of tolls.” He had a good idea: to implement a toll. We listened to him and used his idea. I congratulate him, but now I would like to know why he has changed his mind.

Champlain Bridge
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

NDP

Jamie Nicholls Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government still refuses to say whether a viable public transit plan will be part of the new Champlain Bridge. First it is making Montreal and the south shore families foot the bill, and now it is ignoring 18,000 public transit passengers who cross that bridge each day.

The government members are so out of touch with the needs of Montreal and the south shore, we have to wonder whether they have ever been there. Why will the government not commit to a vital public transit plan for the Champlain Bridge?

Champlain Bridge
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, here is another NDP member with an excellent idea. The NDP transport critic, the hon. member who just spoke on the matter, has said, and I quote, “...as a party, we are not against PPPs”. He also said that in some cases tolls make sense. I congratulate him again on these great ideas. We listened to him and we thank him for giving his opinion on the matter.

Champlain Bridge
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

NDP

Jamie Nicholls Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, that is not exactly the answer I was looking for. I was talking about public transit.

Why has the government not made any plans for public transit on the new Champlain Bridge? Every day, 400 buses carry 18,000 passengers across the bridge. There is a great demand. The minister keeps saying that it is a provincial responsibility, while repeating that the project is 100% federal. When will this government adopt a plan for public transit?

Champlain Bridge
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, prior to the announcement made by our great minister, the NDP had suggested a toll system to pay for the Champlain Bridge. That is why many people are now saying that the new name for the NDP should be “new duty to pay”. So I would like to thank the NDP member for suggesting this excellent idea. In the end, it is the Conservatives who are taking action and getting results for Montrealers and Canadians.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, it has been a tough week for the Minister of the Environment. The environment commissioner slammed his work and Europe is proposing a fuel quality directive. The message is clear: the oil sands pollute too much to compete with clean energy. The public relations campaigns are not hiding the devastating impact of the oil sands.

When will the government recognize this?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands
Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, we do not agree with the energy directive that has come out from the EU.

We are going to continue to work to represent and to protect Canadian oil sands interests and Canadian economic interests. We will stand with the workers. We will stand with the industry. We are going to protect the environment at the same time.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Minister of the Environment went to great lengths to clear up the confusion around the muzzling of Environment Canada scientists. It seems that the department scientists are completely free, subject to availability of course, to speak with responsible journalists.

Would the minister please table in this House a list of these so-called responsible journalists so we can know to whom the government is actually talking about its failed environmental plans?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, our government is squarely focused on what matters to Canadians: jobs, economic growth and protecting the environment.

We are proud of the work of our scientists within Environment Canada. Ministers speak for the environment. That is what is laid out in our communication policy, and that is why we take questions in question period.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, in September, a 23-year-old woman was fatally shot on the Samson Cree Nation. She was killed in the house next door to where five-year-old Ethan Yellowbird was killed just two months earlier.

Youth gangs are responsible for the increasing violence in a community where youth are disaffected and hopeless.

If the government is truly sincere about assisting the most vulnerable, why does it persist in spending billions on prisons instead of investing in programs to prevent youth crime in first nations?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, the member talked about the situation with the Samson Cree. I did meet with the chief. He has been collaborating with the RCMP. The community has some very good plans. We have agreed to collaborate with that first nation and help finance some of the work that needs to be done. This is to break up the criminal element from being able to operate in the way that it was.

We are making progress and working collaboratively with that first nation.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, as the minister has attested, the Samson Cree Nation initiated a joint review with the RCMP, the government and experts to address crime, which is among the highest in Canadian aboriginal communities.

The key recommendation supported by all parties was to provide a youth centre to provide programs to divert youth from gangs. The first nation is begging the government to fully cost share with it. It is struggling to find other funders.

Instead of spending billions more on jailing criminals after the fact, why will the government not offer more than one-fifth of the cost to build this centre and prevent more aboriginal victims of crime?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, we do believe in working in partnership with the first nations.

The first nation, with its original proposal, talked about cost sharing. We are prepared to enter into cost-sharing agreements. We have done so. I think the actions we have agreed to take are appropriate for the circumstances.

Political Party Subsidies
Oral Questions

October 7th, 2011 / 11:35 a.m.

NDP

Lise St-Denis Saint-Maurice—Champlain, QC

Mr. Speaker, the measure announced by the government to phase out subsidies to political parties is itself partisan. The Conservative Party is using a parliamentary rule to crush political parties who do not benefit from the visibility of being in power to raise funds.

Will the government, before this House, commit to respecting usual parliamentary procedure for the debate on eliminating political subsidies?

Political Party Subsidies
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Edmonton—Sherwood Park
Alberta

Conservative

Tim Uppal Minister of State (Democratic Reform)

Mr. Speaker, in 2006 our government took big business and big labour out of politics with the Federal Accountability Act.

We are acting quickly to continue bringing transparency to government by phasing out the direct subsidy of political parties. We think money should come from voters, not from corporations, not from unions, and not from government.

Political parties should do their own fundraising and not live off taxpayer-funded handouts.