House of Commons Hansard #29 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

Employment
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Dan Albas Okanagan—Coquihalla, BC

Mr. Speaker, in recent days the NDP has repeatedly talked about higher taxes on Canadians; everything from complaining about our GST reductions, demanding a new tax on everyday financial transactions, or punishing with a $10 billion-a-year hike on taxes for employers. This NDP high tax agenda is worrying for it would cost Canadian jobs when we can least afford it.

Our Conservative government, on the other hand, is on a positive low tax and pro-job strategy for jobs and growth that actually is working.

Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance please update the House on Canada's job market?

Employment
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Saint Boniface
Manitoba

Conservative

Shelly Glover Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I am happy to report that Statistics Canada announced today that over 60,000 net new jobs were created in September. Our job growth shows that we are on the right track.

Indeed, approximately 650,000 net new jobs have been created since July 2009. That is over 90% full-time jobs and nearly 80% of them from the private sector.

However, too many Canadians are still looking for work and the global recovery remains very fragile. That is why we are looking forward to implementing the next phase of Canada's economic action plan and its job creating measures like the hiring credit for small businesses.

Pension
Oral Questions

October 7th, 2011 / 11:45 a.m.

NDP

Rosane Doré Lefebvre Alfred-Pellan, QC

Mr. Speaker, global economic instability is threatening the retirement savings of millions of Canadians. Yet the Conservatives are doubling down on the stock market by moving ahead with their ill-advised pooled registered pension plans. This government must take action to protect the qualify of life of retired Canadians.

When will the Conservatives stop gambling with Canadians' pensions and start strengthening the Canada pension plan?

Pension
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Saint Boniface
Manitoba

Conservative

Shelly Glover Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, we have worked hard to enhance retirement security for Canadians. We have reduced taxes for seniors and retirees by $2 billion, including by allowing pension income splitting. We have reformed the framework for pensions that are under federal jurisdiction in order to better protect retirees. Together with the provinces, we have reviewed the proposals for making other improvements, and we about to implement a new pooled registered pension plan, the PRPP. The PRPP will allow pension plans to be offered at little cost to millions of people who have never had a pension plan before.

Pension
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet Hochelaga, QC

Mr. Speaker, the truth is that in the last quarter stocks fell 12%. Private pension funds were hit extremely hard. We know that pooled registered pension plans do nothing to protect Canadians when the stock market plummets.

We need a stronger public pension plan. Canadians and provincial leaders across the country are demanding basic retirement security. The Canada pension plan can provide this by generating larger and more stable investment returns.

Will the government stop gambling with the future of Canadians and strengthen CPP?

Pension
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Saint Boniface
Manitoba

Conservative

Shelly Glover Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, CPP reforms continue to be examined by ourselves and provincial governments, but I want to note that many provinces share the concerns of small businesses and others if we increase costs during a fragile global recovery.

I want to cite something that was said during the election by Catherine Swift, president and CEO of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business, when she was talking about the NDP's suggestion to double CPP. She said: “That would mean probably about a 60 to 70 per cent increase in premiums from what we understand”.

That was very, very worrisome. So any tax breaks that were in the NDP platform were grossly outmatched by what it was going to ding--

Pension
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order, please. The hon. member for Louis-Saint-Laurent.

Service Canada
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Alexandrine Latendresse Louis-Saint-Laurent, QC

Mr. Speaker, government cuts to Service Canada are harming the most vulnerable Canadians. There are places in the country where it is no longer possible to speak to a human being. The telephone system hangs up on people who call before they are even able to speak to an agent. By cutting jobs at Service Canada, the government is choking the system.

Why is the government cutting services for unemployed Canadians?

Service Canada
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, we are committed to serving Canadian taxpayers responsibly and respecting the money they earn. That is why we are trying to improve the services offered by Service Canada. We are protecting our official languages and are making improvements to the telephone system. We are trying to provide the best service possible to Canadians.

Service Canada
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Ève Péclet La Pointe-de-l'Île, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government clearly does not understand anything about what the unemployed in this country are going through. Some must even wait up to three months to receive their employment insurance benefits. Waiting periods are already too long, and the government is now adding to them by making cuts to the services offered by Service Canada.

Will the government finally explain why it is preventing unemployed Canadians from accessing the insurance they themselves paid into?

Service Canada
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, the reality is that during the global recession, we added workers to handle the increased volume of employment insurance claims, and we even improved standards. As a result, over 80% of people received their first employment insurance payment within four weeks, compared to 10 weeks under the Liberals.

Champlain Bridge
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Denis Coderre Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to come back to the issue of the Champlain Bridge. We will talk about the safety of the current bridge another time, but I want to come back to the issue of the new bridge. There is talk of a public-private partnership, a PPP. Unlike the NDP, we are in agreement with that and we will not change our minds.

The issue of timelines is crucial. Environmental assessments take at least three years. A Mohawk cemetery has been discovered. Very serious negotiations will be needed. There is talk of expropriation and a development plan, and we have yet to touch on public transit.

The people of Montreal and the south shore want timelines. Will the government table timelines?

Champlain Bridge
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member is right—building a bridge like this will take time. Luckily, our government has had confirmation that the Champlain Bridge is safe, and we are working to keep it that way. We are taking the necessary measures to maintain that safety. If the safety of the Champlain Bridge was so important to the opposition parties, they should have supported our budget last March since it included this investment.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, on Tuesday the Minister of the Environment stated unequivocally that we do not muzzle our scientists. Yesterday, we were told that Environment Canada scientist Dr. Tarasick was available to speak to responsible media, but the minister's office has denied access to the National Post, Ottawa Citizen and The Gazette.

If Environment Canada's ozone scientists are not being muzzled, why have these newspapers been denied access? Does the minister not consider these news organizations to be responsible media?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, we certainly are proud of the work of our scientists and the contributions they make to protecting Canada's environment. Ministers speak for the government. That is why we give answers in question period.