House of Commons Hansard #52 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was water.

Topics

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

It being Wednesday, we will have the singing of the national anthem led today by the hon. member for Newmarket—Aurora.

[Members sang the national anthem]

University of Ontario Institute of Technology
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Colin Carrie Oshawa, ON

Mr. Speaker, there is a reason that Oshawa is considered one of the fastest growing cities in Canada. Oshawa boasts some of the most impressive post-secondary institutions in Canada that will help create the jobs of tomorrow today.

Nowhere is this more evident than at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. In Oshawa, UOIT has created the perfect storm in the name of innovation. Recently, the Automotive Centre of Excellence was officially opened in the midst of a raging Arctic blizzard. This world-class facility includes one of the largest and most sophisticated climatic wind tunnels in the world. This tunnel can create temperatures from -40°C to 60°C and is able to assimilate conditions like driving in the middle of an Arctic blizzard. This is where the next generation of electric and alternative fuel vehicles, green energy technology and products will be discovered, tested and validated.

UOIT will help lead Oshawa into the future.

I would like to take this opportunity to welcome the new vice-chancellor, Dr. Tim McTiernan.

Poverty
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Don Davies Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to highlight an issue that touches far too many people in Canada: child and family poverty.

It has been over 20 years since the House unanimously adopted an NDP motion to eradicate child poverty and yet, in 2011, the statistics are appalling: 639,000, nearly one in ten Canadian children, live in poverty today; and 52% of all single mothers with children under six live in poverty.

Having a full-time job is often not enough. One in four Canadians working full time earn less than the poverty rate. One in three poor children have at least one parent who works full time.

Canadian children, seniors, families and youth all are experiencing levels of poverty that are simply unacceptable in a nation as wealthy such as ours. This is an intolerable situation that demands action from all elected officials, but especially from our federal government.

Today, I call on the government to join provincial and territorial governments, first nations and civil society to develop a national poverty reduction strategy. We cannot, we must not and we should not wait any longer.

John Rhodes Scholarship Dinner
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Bryan Hayes Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Mr. Speaker, I recently attended the John Rhodes Scholarship dinner in my riding of Sault Ste. Marie in honour of Dr. Lou and Mae Lukenda.

Dr. Lukenda is a dentist, philanthropist and citizen extraordinaire. He donated the Windsor Park Hotel to Algoma University, which has been converted into a student residence, assisting the recently accredited university to grow and prosper. He also donated a corporate office he owned to our sister city of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, for conversion to its new city hall.

When our local OHL team, the Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds, were in danger of being moved from Sault Ste. Marie, he bought the team, preserving a high level of athletic competition, an economic benefit for Sault Ste. Marie.

He excelled in dentistry for 38 years and as a distinguished member of the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario, Dr. Lou and Mae Lukenda have increased the well-being of many who live in my riding through their philanthropy, civil engagement and professionalism. They have demonstrated what it means to be good citizens.

I congratulate Dr. Lou and Mae Lukenda and thank them for truly serving their community.

The Environment
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, in 1987, Canada took a leadership role at the Vienna Convention, which phased out ozone destroying CFCs. Studies show that without it most of the ozone layer would have been destroyed by 2065, a catastrophe.

This week, the ninth meeting of parties to the Vienna Convention is being held in Bali, Indonesia. Our commitments to ozone monitoring and science will be questioned, given that Environment Canada's ozone scientists have received letters saying that their positions are in jeopardy.

Next week is the Durban climate change conference. The International Energy Agency says that rising fossil fuel energy use will lead to irreversible and potentially catastrophic climate change.

Will the government remember that we have a moral obligation to our children and grandchildren and honour it by meeting scientifically defensible greenhouse gas targets?

We are thankful for the action the world took in 1987 and we need to be similarly courageous now.

Justice
Statements By Members

November 23rd, 2011 / 2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Rob Anders Calgary West, AB

Mr. Speaker, our government is committed to putting real criminals behind bars. Canadians who have been a victim of a crime should not be recriminalized by the criminal justice system. That is why our government has introduced Bill C-26. This legislation would bring much needed reform for Canadians to defend themselves, their property and arrest the perpetrators.

Last year, Joseph Singleton, a resident of Alberta, while trying to protect his property, was charged with assault. Rather than being supported, his brave act to defend his home and his family has caused him more harm than good. Mr. Singleton had to go through the complex and lengthy court system to clear his own name.

There should be no more innocent victims who are penalized for defending their property. Bill C-26 would help police and judges to determine who the actual criminals and victims are and will prevent similar cases. Canadians would now have the fundamental right to protect themselves, their family and their property.

Child Poverty
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Chris Charlton Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, it has been another tough year for Canadian families. However, thanks to the Occupy Movement, unprecedented media attention has finally been brought to the growing gap between the rich and the poor.

The disparity between the top 1% of income earners and the other 99% affects us all. Unequal societies are more likely to become dysfunctional. Health care costs rise while productivity is lost. And, it is children who are hurt the most.

Twenty-two years ago this month, Ed Broadbent introduced a landmark motion to end child poverty by the year 2000. His motion received unanimous support in this House but, over two decades later, the number of children living in poverty today is at almost the same level as it was in 1989.

In fact, out of the 24 richest nations in the world, Canada ranks 17th in caring for its children in poverty and 38% of food bank users are children. There are more food banks in Canada today than there are McDonald's. One in nine Canadian children live in poverty.

This holiday season I urge all members to support their local food banks and the United Way, but, frankly, if we want to give true meaning to the spirit of Christmas, then we need to act here in Parliament to end poverty now.

Lorne Reznowski
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Rod Bruinooge Winnipeg South, MB

Mr. Speaker, a constituent of mine, a retired University of Manitoba professor, Dr. Lorne Reznowski, passed away on November 9, and I would like to reflect on his important contributions to Canada.

In the 1960s and 1970s, Dr. Reznowski worked with both Social Credit Party leaders, Robert Thompson and Real Caouette, and later became leader himself while the party still had MPs in the House of Commons.

As a strong opponent of Prime Minister Trudeau's policies, Dr. Reznowski correctly predicted that the 1969 omnibus bill would bring Canada into a demographic crisis within his lifetime. Of course, he was right on this and on so many other issues related to the social policies of that era.

His strong beliefs are summed up in a quote from the 1980-81 Who's Who in America:

I firmly believe that one should never compromise his principles no matter what the immediate gain may be. I don't believe those principles should be swayed by Gallup polls or opinion surveys. My principles are not rooted in the prevailing secular humanism but in the Christian tradition.

I extend my heartfelt condolences to the Reznowski family.

Prostate Cancer
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Ed Holder London West, ON

Mr. Speaker, several years ago, I lost a great friend to prostate cancer and it sorrows me to this day to think that it may have been preventable.

He is my motivation for participating in movember again this year. Along with thousands of other men, I have boldly made a challenge to my peers and have asked them to take the risk seriously and get their prostate checked regularly.

The month-long movember campaign has broached this subject with humour because too many men still do not get it.

Prostate cancer is highly treatable and death often avoidable but it requires men to take responsibility, drop their modesty for a few minutes and get checked annually. A few minutes of caution is worth avoiding a shortened life of regret.

I applaud those participating in movember on both sides of this House and around the world. By having some fun being serious, we are helping to save lives.

Finally, I would like to appeal to all women to encourage the men in their lives, their husbands, brothers and fathers, to get checked regularly. Their support and encouragement may just be the final push needed to have their loved ones take responsibility for their health. Together, we will fight this awful disease.

Praxède Lévesque-Lapointe, Woman Farmer of the Year
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Jean Rousseau Compton—Stanstead, QC

Mr. Speaker, last month, Praxède Lévesque-Lapointe was named woman farmer of the year by the Fédération des agricultrices du Québec for her hard work with female shea butter producers in Burkina Faso. In the small town of Bury, she and her husband were pioneers in running an organic sugar bush; producing organic raw milk cheese; raising endangered animal breeds; and lastly, importing, processing and marketing shea butter derivatives—all on the family farm.

The impact this partnership has had on the quality of life of female producers in Burkina Faso is very important to the survival of the villages and is also essential to the emancipation of these African women. This award recognizes this farmer's perseverance, courage and innovation over the years with her late husband, Daniel Lapointe. Praxède Lévesque-Lapointe is deserving of our admiration because she is an example of entrepreneurship and humanity at its best.

Taxation
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Wai Young Vancouver South, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals are back at it again with one of their favourite policies: tax everything.

Just yesterday the member for Vancouver Quadra tweeted about her desire to see European-style carbon taxes here in Canada. The member for Saint-Laurent—Cartierville also recently advocated for a global carbon tax. If the Liberals had their way, Canadians would be paying substantially more for gas for their cars, for electricity for their homes, and for everything else that they buy. These are just more reminders of the Liberals' hidden agenda of imposing a massive new tax on everything if they ever got their chance.

The interim Liberal leader recently called for the end of tax credits for children, transit users and workers. The Liberals continue to call for higher taxes on job creators despite the current global economic uncertainty. The Liberal Party still has no new ideas other than higher taxes for Canadian families, just like their friends in the NDP.

Violence Against Women
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Lise St-Denis Saint-Maurice—Champlain, QC

Mr. Speaker, violence against women comes in many forms. This violence is increasingly being seen and recognized in the form of physical injuries, rape, kidnapping and murder.

But the subtle, everyday violence that is expressed through contempt and hurtful comments is not so easily spotted. Women who suffer this verbal violence pay for these insidious attacks with their psychological well-being.

To increase women's self-confidence, we need to remain vigilant in the face of situations that prevent them from gaining that confidence. We need to encourage education programs to address the reactionary attitudes of some when it comes to women in the workplace and in society in general. Violence is not just found on the front page of the newspaper; there is also the verbal violence that attacks our self-esteem and kills our dreams. My words—

Violence Against Women
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order, please. The hon. member for Mississauga—Brampton South.

Eid on the Hill
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Eve Adams Mississauga—Brampton South, ON

Mr. Speaker, later today hundreds of Canadian Muslims will come to Parliament Hill for the first annual Eid on the Hill event. They will be hosted by the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism. They will be here to talk to members of Parliament and to celebrate the many achievements of the Muslim community in Canada.

My riding of Mississauga—Brampton South has a very large Muslim community. Muslim Canadians enrich our culture and our lives in academia, arts, business and many other fields. That is why I am so proud that tonight the Prime Minister of Canada will be welcoming Muslim Canadians to our nation's capital. I cannot wait to join them.

Homelessness
Statements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Marc Garneau Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to remind the House that homelessness in Canada continues to be a problem.

I am appalled to see this government refuse to implement a viable, long-term plan to address this problem, which affects all of our communities, both socially and economically.

Earlier this month, I attended a huge rally in Montreal organized by RAPSIM. Not one representative from this government bothered to show up at this event, at which RAPSIM's 90 member organizations were able to discuss the pressing needs that exist in the fight against homelessness.

Unfortunately, the number of homeless people is not diminishing. This fact must be recognized and appropriate action must be taken.

We need to fulfill our responsibilities. I urge the government to act diligently to address this unacceptable situation, which has an impact on all Canadians.