House of Commons Hansard #56 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-10.

Topics

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, as the minister already pointed out, since coming to office, this government has spent some $90 million just on Attawapiskat. That is over $50,000 for every man, woman and child in the community. Obviously, we are not very happy that the results do not seem to have been achieved for that. We are concerned about that. We have officials looking into it and taking action.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, in fact, the number the Prime Minister is using also includes the cost of all education in Attawapiskat.

It would seem that the implication of what the Prime Minister is saying is that it is the people of Attawapiskat who are responsible for the problems they are facing. That is a disgraceful response from the Government of Canada.

When will the government start taking responsibility for this deplorable situation, which is an embarrassment to the reputation of the entire country?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

What I am saying, Mr. Speaker, is that the Liberal Party's suggestion of simply throwing money is not the solution.

This government has made significant investments and has taken its responsibility seriously. This government will continue to do so. We will make sure we get the results we need.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is disgraceful for a government to waste money like the Conservatives did to host a party for representatives of visiting countries when there are people with nowhere to live, no heat and no work. They do not have the absolute basic living conditions that everyone in Canada should have.

When will the government accept the responsibilities it has under the Constitution and its moral obligations with regard to the conditions that exist in our country's major cities?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, when this government spends $50,000 for each person in the community for a total of over $90 million, it is not wasting money. We expect to achieve results and we will work with communities to ensure that we do.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the South African high commissioner spoke about the reports that Canada may be withdrawing from Kyoto. She called the move disturbing and disappointing. She said it will undermine the negotiating process at Durban because Canada has not only planned a withdrawal, but has actively lobbied other countries to do the same.

The minister has admitted he has no intention to negotiate a new climate deal, and he has not denied his intention to withdraw from Kyoto. At the same time, the minister has said that his intentions in Durban are not to derail the negotiations on climate. Will the minister tell us what his intentions really are?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, instead of talking about intentions, let us talk about real action with regard to climate change: $250 million to support regulatory activities to address climate change and $86 million to support clean energy regulatory reforms. New Democrats voted against this.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, why do I not take a crack at deciphering what the intentions are?

We know that the Conservatives are waiting until December 23 to announce their withdrawal from Kyoto. If a country withdraws from the agreement, it does not take effect for one year. That means that Canada can try to sabotage the negotiations this year in Durban and next year in Qatar.

It is this kind of behaviour that denigrates and undermines Canada's reputation internationally. Will the minister admit that this is his plan?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, agreements that do not include major emitters like China and the United States will not work. That is why we remain committed to reducing Canada's greenhouse gas emissions by 17% below 2005 levels by 2020. We are making good progress through tangible action that we have taken here at home. We are proud of this record.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Laurin Liu Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, by neglecting the environment, this government is jeopardizing the health of our families and of the economy. The Conservatives are turning their backs on the international community so that they do not have to be accountable for their greenhouse gas emissions. Reneging on their commitments to Canadians and other countries is a strategy that hurts everyone.

Why is the government refusing to table a credible plan that takes the environment and the economy into account?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I am glad my colleague opposite has acknowledged a fundamental point. We need to balance our environment and the economy and this is what we are doing. This is a principle that the opposition would gladly throw to the wind when it denigrates our oil sands sector.

Our government's sector-by-sector approach, which is being developed by a robust consultation process, is designed to meet a tangible target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 17% below 2005 levels by 2020, while being cognizant of Canada's economic growth. This approach is prudent and action focused and we are proud of it.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Laurin Liu Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, after seeing the Conservatives drag their feet for six years, major trade partners are slamming doors in our face. They disapprove of the government's environmental choices. Not only are the Conservatives isolating us from the rest of the world, but their inaction is costing us jobs here in Canada.

Why does this government refuse to understand that it is possible to create good-quality jobs while investing in clean energies, as our partners are doing?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, $40 million for Sustainable Development Technology Canada was included in this year's budget. Again, our government is committed to clean energy and the New Democrats keep voting against measures to support it.

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

November 29th, 2011 / 2:30 p.m.

NDP

Brian Masse Windsor West, ON

Mr. Speaker, Conservatives are not only dropping the ball internationally but also here at home.

Under the secret deal the government is negotiating, Americans will have new powers to track Canadians. The government is keeping us in the dark about what this means for Canadians' privacy. The Privacy Commissioner is calling for more transparency, saying we should enter into the border deal with both eyes wide open, but the government is pulling the wool over the eyes of Canadians.

When will it tell us what is on the table?

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, work is in progress with the Obama administration to try to establish an agreement that protects and promotes jobs in this country. We want more economic growth, and we do not want the border to become a wall. We want more trade and more jobs here in Canada. That is important for every part of this country, but nowhere is it more important than in Windsor, Ontario, where the auto sector desperately needs less congestion at the border.

We are committed to continuing to fight for jobs in Canada and we are committed to working with the Obama administration.