House of Commons Hansard #56 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was crime.

Topics

Government Communications
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement President of the Treasury Board and Minister for the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario

Mr. Speaker, I have been called a lot of things, but never “Soviet-style”. This is a first for me.

I want to assure the hon. member that in fact there is no need for a directive that she seems to believe in, because it has been a long-standing practice across various governments. In fact, when the Liberals were in government, they used the term “Chrétien government”, “Martin government” and similar variations in official government communications.

The proof is in the pudding. This terminology is widely used by journalists and by the opposition parties. If the circumstances permit, those are the circumstances in which we would use that term.

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Wayne Marston Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government says it is still committed to improving the Canada pension plan and the Quebec pension plan because that is the favourite option of Canadians.

Unlike the government's pooled pension scheme, the CPP and QPP are inflation-proof, provide a guaranteed defined benefit, and cost less.

Canadians are not that concerned with voting records; what they want to know is whether the Minister of Finance will guarantee to the House that the CPP expansion is on the agenda for the upcoming December meeting of the federal, provincial and territorial finance ministers.

Pensions
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Minister of State (Finance)

Mr. Speaker, in talks on the Canada pension plan with our partners, the provinces, we continue to discuss any enhancements that may be appropriate at this time, but I would remind the hon. member that there was consensus, unanimous support, among the federal, provincial and territorial finance ministers to pursue the framework for a pooled registered pension plan.

That is why we tabled it in this House. We continue discussions. We continue to develop the regulations around it to make an effective retirement plan for the 60% of Canadians in the workforce who do not have a pension plan right now.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Dean Allison Niagara West—Glanbrook, ON

Mr. Speaker, small- and medium-sized businesses employ nearly half of all working Canadians.

Our Conservative government recognizes that when we create new opportunities abroad, we create jobs and prosperity for Canadian small businesses and their workers and families. That is why our government is moving forward on our job-creating pro-trade plan.

Can the Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway tell the House about the recent report received from the Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises Advisory Board?

International Trade
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Abbotsford
B.C.

Conservative

Ed Fast Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for Niagara West—Glanbrook for his hard work on behalf of businesses in his riding.

This morning I met with small and medium-sized business leaders and they strongly support our pro-trade plan.

Here is what the president of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business, Catherine Swift, had to say:

It is encouraging to see the government taking small-business issues into account when negotiating trade agreements.... The government’s pro-trade plan will benefit not only Canadian SMEs looking to expand into new markets like Europe but also the Canadian economy as a whole

This Conservative government is working hard--

International Trade
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Vaudreuil-Soulanges.

Canada Post
Oral Questions

November 29th, 2011 / 3 p.m.

NDP

Jamie Nicholls Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives are currently jeopardizing the delicate economic situation in the regions. Cuts to several post offices in Quebec are completely destroying postal services in rural areas. Postal services are essential to our communities and contribute to their economic development.

Will this government finally act responsibly and come up with ways to develop the services, instead of making them disappear?

Canada Post
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia
Manitoba

Conservative

Steven Fletcher Minister of State (Transport)

Mr. Speaker, the volume of mail fluctuates from province to province and year to year. Canada Post makes decisions on the number of hours worked based on those fluctuations. People who have a permanent job with Canada Post will keep their job with Canada Post. There are no job reductions, as the member has stated.

We are committed to ensuring that all Canadians get the postal service they deserve.

The Environment
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Green

Elizabeth May Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, I wonder if the hon. Prime Minister recalls being present when the former prime minister, Brian Mulroney, cited, as the scientific consensus on climate change, that:

...humanity is conducting an unintended, uncontrolled, globally pervasive experiment whose ultimate consequences could be second only to a global nuclear war.

The Minister of the Environment said that Kyoto is in the past.

I would ask the Prime Minister not to leave Canadian leadership in the past and show one fraction of the commitment of the former prime minister, Brian Mulroney, to address this crisis.

The Environment
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, one thing is for sure. We do need to have leadership in the economy , and that is what this government stands for. We balance the economy with environmental protection. That balance is achievable and we have a plan to achieve that.

That is why Canada has a very strong action plan that is focused on reducing our emissions by 17% of 2005 levels by 2020. That is real leadership.

Decorum in the House
Points of Order
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday we all participated in a vote to which there was a very substantial demonstration on the side of the government, as well as a very substantial demonstration in the gallery--

Decorum in the House
Points of Order
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Decorum in the House
Points of Order
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I can see the demonstration has not entirely stopped.

Somebody just said, “You got that right”. I think I do have it right and that is why I am asking the question. I would ask, Mr. Speaker, if you would take note of the extent of the demonstration.

I also think it is fair to say that the member for Churchill was excoriated by the members opposite because of the fact that there was one sole demonstrator on the other side of the House with which she had nothing to do. However, the demonstrators--

Decorum in the House
Points of Order
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Decorum in the House
Points of Order
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order, please. The hon. member for Toronto Centre has the floor and we will have a little order.