House of Commons Hansard #65 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was trade.

Topics

Danielle Lemieux-Lessard
Statements by Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Claude Gravelle Nickel Belt, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is with sadness that I rise in the House today to pay tribute to Danielle Lemieux-Lessard.

Danielle has worked in the House of Commons for 31 years, including 15 years as an administrative assistant in the Private Members' Business Office, where she played a key role with regard to petitions and adjournment proceedings.

There are people who contribute significantly to the workings of the House who are always behind the scenes. Danielle is one of those people.

Danielle was always ready to help new members and show them how to get around the Hill. She was always reliable, and her never-failing dedication was appreciated and will never be forgotten.

Her name might be “Lemieux-Lessard”, but to us she is “la meilleure”, or “the best”. We will always remember Danielle for her great personality and her sense of humour.

Danielle, on behalf of the New Democratic Party, thank you and farewell. Best wishes in your future endeavours, happy retirement and bon voyage.

Child abductions
Statements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Lois Brown Newmarket—Aurora, ON

Mr. Speaker, today I bring awareness to an issue that hits close to home. For the past two and a half years, my constituent, Stephen Watkins, has courageously been working to locate and bring back his two children who were abducted to Poland.

I want this House to know that Mr. Watkins is not alone in this fight. Since learning of the situation, Canadian consular officials have been actively engaging with local authorities in Poland, the provincial authorities, and the York regional police on this case.

Today, the minister of state announced the launch of an interactive consent letter for parents with children travelling abroad. This valuable resource is intended to make it easier for children to travel while preventing their abduction to foreign countries. The minister of state has noted:

Child abductions are among the most distressing circumstances for Canadian parents and are among the most difficult and complex cases faced by consular officials.

Our government stands with Canadian families at home and abroad. We take cases involving children extremely seriously. We will continue to work with our partners toward a positive resolution in the case of my constituent, Mr. Watkins.

Roger Crête
Statements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Ottawa—Vanier, ON

Mr. Speaker, Vanier lost one of its own on December 7 when Roger Crête, the former mayor of Vanier, passed away.

In addition to serving as mayor, Roger also worked with distinction as a municipal councillor and was a very active volunteer in his community. Roger was an engaged businessman and his longstanding contribution earned him the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens, both anglophone and francophone.

Roger Crête leaves behind his spouse Gisèle, their children—Pierre, Pauline and Robert—his grandsons and three great-grandchildren. I extend my sincerest condolences to his family. We have lost a friend and an exemplary servant whose contribution will remain etched in our collective memory. I would also like to thank the Crête family—Gisèle, the children and their spouses—for their dedication and immense contribution to our community. They were proud of their father, and he was and will remain equally proud of them.

On behalf of the residents of Ottawa—Vanier, farewell Roger and, above all, thank you.

New Democratic Party of Canada
Statements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Edmonton Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, members of the NDP oppose creating jobs. They travel abroad to attack Canada and they oppose all free trade agreements. Even the member for Skeena—Bulkley Valley would, as he says, “violently agree”.

The NDP's leadership candidates attack our energy sector and many across the aisle naively cry for a halt to the development of the oil sands. They have tried to kill billions of dollars in investment and are happy to sacrifice 622,000 jobs across Canada. They have no policies that will secure Canada's economic future.

Instead of supporting private sector union jobs, the NDP chooses to side with a small group of foreign financed, special interest activists who protest against our energy resources.

The oil sands are a proven strategic resource for Canada that creates jobs and economic opportunity for Canadians in all provinces and all regions of the country. Abandoning Canada's economic interests is yet another clear indication that the ineffective, disunited NDP is unfit to govern.

Aboriginal Affairs
Statements by Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, convicted fraudster, Bruce Carson, was a key advisor to the Prime Minister until 2008, and he did not leave because he was fired. He left with $40 million to perpetrate an even greater fraud, starting two phony think tanks to take the stink off the oil sands.

However, his greatest scam was yet to come; using his Conservative connections to exploit the appalling living conditions on a first nations reserve. What kind of a man sees human tragedy as an opportunity to cheat people and what kind of a government would give such power to such a horror of a human being?

Mulroney used to say that the boys have to make a living but we thought we had closed the door on that sordid chapter of Canadian politics. It seems that history is repeating itself.

Contempt for Parliament, ignoring the rule of law and letting loathsome parasites try to fatten themselves on the third world conditions of first nations reserves are all things that lead us to the conclusion that the Conservatives are not fit to govern.

Statute of Westminster
Statements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

John Williamson New Brunswick Southwest, NB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday marked the 80th anniversary of the Statute of Westminster, one of the most important documents in our country's history. On that day, Canada achieved equality with the United Kingdom and our sister dominions.

As the Prime Minister said:

This important milestone reminds us foremost of how Canadians who came before us earned our country’s independence through bravery and merit, particularly in World War I.

The statute removed London's ability to make laws for Canada enshrining our equal status as a nation. Our system can be traced back to the common ties of the Magna Carta and the Westminster system of responsible government to the statute in 1931. These noble principles have universal application yet, sadly, have not been universally accepted throughout the world.

We continue to build upon our proud foundations and work closely with the Commonwealth nations. The Commonwealth shares a common history and values that the world needs: freedom, democracy, human rights and the rule of law.

The Economy
Oral Questions

December 12th, 2011 / 2:15 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer
Québec

NDP

Nycole Turmel Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, after creating the biggest deficit in the history of Canada, the Conservative government will be in a structural deficit until at least 2017. That is what the Parliamentary Budget Officer said.

With their reckless corporate tax cuts, the Conservatives are gutting the fiscal capacity of the government to provide people the services they need. Why do they continue to harm Canada's finances by digging the structural deficit even further with even more corporate tax giveaways?

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, my friend, the Leader of the Opposition, can quote the Parliamentary Budget Officer. I can see that bet and raise it by quoting the Minister of Finance who, I might add for her and this House, this past year, was voted as the best finance minister in the world.

Our low tax plan is helping create jobs. That is why the provincial NDP Government of Manitoba is working with us and why Ontario's Liberal government is working with us.

We have a plan and that plan is working. That low tax plan has led to the creation of almost 600,000 net new jobs since the bottom of the recession. That is a good start. We remain committed to doing even more.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer
Québec

NDP

Nycole Turmel Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, if only the Conservatives would at least be transparent.

The report of the Parliamentary Budget Officer shows that the government's estimates concerning the deficit are once again too optimistic. That is their rose-coloured glasses policy. The Conservatives are not being straight with Canadians. The report explains that the numbers concerning trade, the GDP and tax revenues are incomplete or unavailable.

Why is the government hiding this information? Why such a lack of transparency? Is it to hide the fact that their economic inaction plan is a complete failure?

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the economic action plan has been a great success but the reality is that far too many Canadians are looking for work, which is why we remain focused on job creation and economic growth.

One of the things we see causing problems for the world economy, whether it is in the United States or in the eurozone, is governments that do not live within their fiscal means. Reckless spending and out of control debt are key problems.

This government is taking some reasonable measures to ensure that we return to a balanced budget, that we focus on job creation and that we focus on economic growth. That is the plan on which we will continue to work diligently.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer
Québec

NDP

Nycole Turmel Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, we need a job creation strategy now.

The Conservative tax strategy is undermining the Canadian economy. Fiscal restraint will only make matters worse. Even the OECD has recognized this. The Parliamentary Budget Officer's report shows that the government's estimates are too optimistic, that the economy is performing below its potential.

Instead of increasing the structural deficit by giving billions of dollars in gifts to large corporations, the government needs to change course immediately, help small and medium-sized businesses and get Canadians back to work.

When will you think about changing course?

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the only plans and proposals the NDP puts forward to help create jobs is to simply raise taxes and spend more. Those have been devastating policies in the United States and they have caused major problems in parts of Europe. That is why this government is focused on our economic action plan.

The next phase of that plan is focused on low taxes, on a competent regulatory environment and making strategic investments in the economy. Canada is doing so much better than the other G7 countries because we have had strong economic leadership from the Prime Minister and especially from the Minister of Finance.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, Attawapiskat symbolizes the fact that this government does not understand the reality of aboriginal people in the north.

The government ignored the problem in Attawapiskat and then blamed the community for its poverty. Yesterday, the minister deceived Canadians about the manager's role and made up answers about the negotiations under way. It is strange. He cannot talk honestly about this crisis.

Does he have any credibility left?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, what a load of nonsense.

Our priority is the health and safety of the people of Attawapiskat. The third party manager is already getting results for the community. He purchased 22 modular homes using federal funds. He is ensuring that programs and social services are being delivered.

We act in good faith and full transparency. We urge the chief and council to join us.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians expect the minister to bring the tragedy of Attawapiskat to a just conclusion but how can they trust a minister who not only goes on national television but comes into the House of Commons and makes things up?

The third party manager is not coordinating relief. That is fiction. It was the community that ordered the trailers. It was the community that worked with emergency measures. The community will not pay for the gold-plated emissary who is twisting his thumbs over in Winnipeg.

When will the minister stop playing Pinocchio and bring this tragedy to a just conclusion?