House of Commons Hansard #134 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was seniors.

Topics

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Cape Breton—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, they have been called little white ones, they have been called big fat ones. Those who tell them are at risk of having their pants catch on fire.

What we know is that the Minister of International Cooperation is standing smack dab in the middle of one and we know that the Prime Minister refuses to do anything about it.

We have seen the contempt that has been shown for this place. We have seen the contempt that has been shown for truth.

The Prime Minister does not want to act. When will he fire the minister?

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I say to my friend from Cape Breton, we know no such thing.

Here is what we do know. We know that the minister made a difficult decision. She made a courageous decision to not provide a $7 million grant to this particular non-governmental organization because she felt that money could be better spent to help some of the world's most poor and vulnerable people.

The minister did the right thing.

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Cape Breton—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, it has been easier getting Hosni Mubarak out of the presidential palace in Cairo than it is to get truth out of the government.

What we know is the minister responsible for CIDA has misled Canadians in this chamber. She underlined those misstatements when she appeared before the standing committee.

Canadians want truth from their government. When they do not get that they expect the Prime Minister to show some integrity, to show some leadership. When will he replace the minister?

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, here is what the Minister of International Cooperation said in this House:

--but ultimately the decision to not provide funding was mine, as Minister of International Cooperation.

The minister communicated her decision to the department. What the minister did is work tremendously hard to help the most vulnerable people in the world rather than to provide funding to this non-governmental organization.

She has been a real leader in Haiti. She has been a real leader in Afghanistan. She has been a real leader in helping Canada's commitment to double our aid to Africa.

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Cape Breton—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has been pretty quick to throw other ministers under the bus. The difference this time is that he has been driving the bus. His DNA is all over this crime scene.

He wanted to silence his critics. The big hand of the PMO comes down and it has a pen in it. That pen writes across the application “not”.

That is not what we want. We cannot put up with this. Does the Prime Minister put up with the minister because it was he who put her up to it in the first place?

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I just read a quote from the minister. She said 11 times last year at a committee of this place that it was she, as Minister of International Cooperation, who made the decision.

She said in the House of Commons and again, I will repeat it for the member for Cape Breton—Canso:

--ultimately the decision to not provide funding was mine, as Minister of International Cooperation.

Let me say this. The minister made a difficult decision. She made a courageous decision. The minister made the right decision, to support the most vulnerable people in the world.

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, Voltaire said, approximately, “Lie, lie, there will always be something left.”

In the case of the Minister of International Cooperation, all she has left is her limousine. We know how she loves limousines and her seat at the cabinet table. That is also the case for the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism, who might want to look in the mirror before accusing journalists of lying.

How can the Prime Minister tolerate such repugnant behaviour?

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the minister was clear. She has not stopped repeating it. She said it 10 times before a House committee and she also said it before the House: she made the decision to not approve funding for this organization. The minister made a difficult decision, but the right one, in order to help the most vulnerable people in Africa.

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians deserve better than that. For most Canadians, honourable conduct is very different than the conduct of the Conservatives. The bad example comes from the top.

Does the Prime Minister realize that by sending these two ministers to do his dirty work he is trying the patience of our citizens even more? Perhaps he is choosing to act this way because he is so cynical that it is exactly what he wants.

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, that is not at all the case.

The minister made the decision to not fund this non-governmental organization. She decided to spend this money in Africa, Haiti and Afghanistan to help the most vulnerable, and she has done a fantastic job as minister over the past five years. It is very important to point out that my colleague's assertions are false.

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, there is mounting pressure for the Minister of International Cooperation to resign. The three opposition parties have raised a question of privilege regarding the minister's misleading statements on the KAIROS file. Editorial writers and tens of thousands of citizens who have signed a petition are calling for her firing.

If the minister has any honour left, what is she waiting for to resign?

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, here are the facts: the minister made the difficult decision to refuse funding to this non-governmental organization. She told the House and the committee that she was the one who had made that decision, which I believe was the right one.

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, the problem is that on April 23, 2010, she said the exact opposite. She said that CIDA had made the decision and that she had approved it.

Despite public pressure and our repeated demands, the Prime Minister insists on keeping her as the Minister of International Cooperation.

Did the Prime Minister personally intervene to cancel the KAIROS funding? Was it his decision, and is that why he is keeping the minister?

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the minister very clearly said that she was the one who made that decision. It cannot be more clear than that. She said it 11 times in committee and repeated it in the House.

I can repeat it again, for my dear Bloc colleague, that the minister made that decision herself. She was responsible for grants awarded by CIDA. She was responsible for decisions and she was the one who made them.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

February 18th, 2011 / 11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Mario Laframboise Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative House leader knows very well that that is not true.

This government, which claims to be tough on criminals, still has not frozen the Ben Ali family's assets. Everyone knows that the former dictator pillaged and extorted money from the people of Tunisia for years. Now Tunisians are demanding justice and have asked Canada to freeze that crook's assets.

Does the Minister of Foreign Affairs realize that, by refusing to freeze Ben Ali's assets, he is sending a message to the dictators of the world that Canada is a safe haven for anyone who wants to escape justice?