House of Commons Hansard #134 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was information.

Topics

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Calgary East
Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, as we have stated on many occasions, there is a process in which one can delist oneself from the no-fly list. We have encouraged the lawyers of Mr. Abdelrazik to go through that process.

There is a process and people should follow that process.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Irene Mathyssen London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, average family debt in Canada now tops $100,000. That is $1.50 owed for every $1 earned, and since the recession began, the number of middle-class families falling behind on their mortgage payments has skyrocketed.

Under the Conservative government, less than half of unemployed Canadians qualify for EI, meaning even a short-term job loss can be devastating.

When will the government start to pay attention to the plight of Canadians and fix the EI system so that they can have access to the benefits that they paid for?

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, I would like to point out to the House and to Canadians, the people who do pay for EI, that over 80% have access to it. In fact, well over 90% have access to EI benefits.

During the recent global recession we made sure that we were delivering their payments to them on time. In fact, we increased the standards of payment, made sure that Canadians received them. We also enhanced EI during the recession offering an additional five weeks of benefits and making sure there was training available to help Canadians get the skills they need for tomorrow.

Unfortunately, that member voted against each of these--

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Order, please. The hon. member for Palliser.

Canadian Forces
Oral Questions

February 18th, 2011 / 11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Ray Boughen Palliser, SK

Mr. Speaker, our Canadian Forces members work tirelessly to protect Canadians and our values at home and abroad. These men and women, who have sacrificed so much, deserve to be taken care of before and after their missions.

Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence tell us what the government is doing to help our serving Canadian Forces members and our veterans?

Canadian Forces
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, our government recognizes our obligations to CF members and veterans.

Today, the Minister of National Defence announced $7 million to support the establishment of five new joint personnel support units, bringing the total to 24. These centres would provide a one-stop access to services like vocational rehab, mental and physical health resources, advice on financial support programs, information about Veterans Affairs programs, et cetera.

Last fall, we announced the legacy of care program for critically injured members. We have almost doubled the number of mental health professionals and we have invested in state-of-the-art rehab equipment.

Our government will continue to provide the best for our men and women in uniform, who do the very best for us each and every day.

Health
Oral Questions

Noon

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, the health minister claims she is working with the MS Society. However, the society is asking the federal government for at least $10 million for research into CCSVI, including clinical trials if and when warranted. The society is also pushing all levels of government to create registries to track Canadians who have been treated outside of Canada.

Will the minister listen to MS patients and take a leadership role in coordinating and funding this work?

Health
Oral Questions

Noon

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, we have established an expert working group to monitor and analyze the results from the MS Society-sponsored studies already under way, both in Canada and in the United States. The provinces, the territories and the federal government have also agreed to move forward to clinical trials once the evidence is available and that was confirmed in September. The provinces, the territories, the medical experts, the MS Society in Canada and in the U.S. are all working together in moving this research forward.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

Noon

NDP

Chris Charlton Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, we all agree that people wanting to work with Canada's most vulnerable must be thoroughly screened. That is why vulnerable sector screening is now required for teachers, social workers, taxi drivers, daycare workers, sport coaches, and many more. However, delays in processing are now costing jobs and valuable services to our communities.

The minister knows it because he announced new fingerprint scanners that would expedite checks. However, he did not announce any money for police forces to actually buy the machines.

Instead of giving photo ops, will the minister commit today to actually give funding?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

Noon

Oxford
Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, in fact, this government has put a great deal of money into this whole program. We are working with law-abiding Canadians who selflessly give their time to coach and volunteer with vulnerable groups such as children. That is why we are pleased to announce the live scan technology will reduce waiting time for the vulnerable sector checks. It is good news for volunteers and vulnerable Canadians who deserve the best protection possible.

Airport Fees
Oral Questions

Noon

Bloc

Robert Carrier Alfred-Pellan, QC

Mr. Speaker, in order to avoid airport fees, more and more tourists from Canada and Quebec are driving to the U.S. to catch flights. According to a survey conducted by the Association des hôteliers du Québec, one-third of vacationers are using this strategy. Billions of dollars in economic spinoffs are being lost by hotel operators, airports and airlines in Quebec and Canada because of the federal government's avarice.

When will this government revise its policy on airport taxes and fees?

Airport Fees
Oral Questions

Noon

Fort McMurray—Athabasca
Alberta

Conservative

Brian Jean Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, this Conservative government supports a strong and competitive Canadian airline industry. We understand there are concerns. We are continuing to look at the situation, just like all situations, for the interests of Canadians.

However, there are many factors influencing a passenger's decision on which airport to use, including convenience, connectivity and routes.

It is also worth noting that the Bloc Québécois voted against every investment that this government made in Quebec, including every infrastructure investment, new roads, new bridges, et cetera. Its members should be ashamed of themselves.

Nisga'a Final Agreement 2008-09 Annual Report
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Kenora
Ontario

Conservative

Greg Rickford Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 32(2), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the Nisga'a Final Agreement 2008-09 Annual Report.

Canadian Cord Blood Collection Act
Routine Proceedings

Noon

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-630, an Act respecting the collection of cord blood in Canada.

Mr. Speaker, the bill calls on the Minister of Health to convene a national conference with the provincial and territorial health ministers to determine the most effective strategy for establishing, administering and funding a national cord blood bank.

Blood that is found in the umbilical cord of a newborn infant is composed of stem cells which can be collected safely, ethically and without controversy. These stem cells have been used for over 20 years in the treatment of many conditions and diseases, including anemia, leukemia and sickle cell disease, and at an experimental level for the treatment of autoimmune disorders such as diabetes, multiple sclerosis and vascular disorders.

Canadians would benefit from a national bank. The provinces and territories of Canada have determined there is a need for a national collection, which would be subject to our own safety standards and would increase the probability of a match inside our country.

I hope all hon. members will join me in supporting the bill.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

International Trade
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills
Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor Minister of State and Chief Government Whip

Mr. Speaker, I believe if you seek it you will find unanimous agreement for the following motion. I move:

That, in relation to its study on Canada-United States trade relations, twelve members of the Standing Committee on International Trade be authorized to travel to Washington, District of Columbia, in February/March 2011, and that the necessary staff accompany the committee.