House of Commons Hansard #124 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was trade.

Topics

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives are selling out Canadians. The government is ushering in the United States' so-called secure flight program, taking our private personal information and giving it to Homeland Security just because Canadians are flying over the U.S. on their way to other countries.

Now, with talk of a new North American security perimeter, Canadians are worried what this might mean for them.

What other rights of Canadians is the Prime Minister trading today, as part of the perimeter security deal?

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, when it comes to aviation security, each country has sovereign rights to set the rules for its own country. The United States understands this is the case with Canada, and we have a lot of respect for the case there.

On this issue, we brought forward a piece of legislation for full, open and public debate, just as the NDP requested. I know members will be very satisfied. They will have additional time to debate that measure in the House of Commons.

However, one thing members can count on when the Prime Minister meets with President Obama is that he will put the interests of Canada and the interests of Canadian jobs as the first and foremost priorities. Members can count on that.

Child Care
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval—Les Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development made an unsavoury remark in the House. She said, “It is the Liberals who wanted to ensure that parents were forced to have other people raise their children”.

Her disdainful remark implies that the 70% of women who send their children to day care are unfit mothers. Do the Conservatives have the nerve to repeat that insult to Canadian families?

Child Care
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, let us be very clear. There is one key thing among many that distinguishes our Conservative government from the Liberal opposition: we believe that Canadian parents should have a choice in their child care.

We believe they should have a choice as to whether they care for their children at home or whether they use daycare or whether someone close them, a family member or a neighbour, looks after their children.

Not only do we support the idea, but we also support it tangibly, by providing the universal child care benefit so that parents can choose how to raise their children. We believe they are the best ones to do that.

Child Care
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval—Les Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, she may believe that, but Canadians do not follow that logic. The cat is out of the bag. The minister has confirmed what we have always known. She said:

[I]t is the Liberals who wanted to ensure that parents were forced to have other people raise their children. We do not believe in that.

Is that what the Conservatives are telling the millions of Canadian mothers who are relying on child care outside the home, that they are bad mothers?

Child Care
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, let us listen to what some Liberals said recently. One Liberal said:

I am strongly opposed to any new national day care program with the cost running into the tens of billions of dollars. Given economic realities and competing demands on government resources, these are programs we cannot afford.

Do members know who said that? It was the Liberal MP for Markham—Unionville who said that.

I have one more here. We have the Liberal member for St. Paul's who said that staying at home to raise the kids did not constitute a real job. Shame on her.

Pensions
Oral Questions

February 4th, 2011 / 11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Lise Zarac LaSalle—Émard, QC

Mr. Speaker, after five years, the Conservatives have done nothing to offer real help for Canadian pensioners.

Their proposed plan will help some people, banks and insurance companies, giving them even higher profits, but it will leave 75% of Canadians who do not have a private pension plan without retirement security.

Why will the Prime Minister not drop his long-standing opposition to the CPP and help middle-class Canadian families?

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Minister of State (Finance)

Mr. Speaker, that is exactly what we are proposing, along with our partners in the provinces that share jurisdiction on pensions across the country. We have been in deep discussions with them trying to develop a plan. We are suggesting that the pooled registered plan will help many Canadians who do not now have any form of a pension.

We are working with our partners to come up with something. It would be nice if the opposition would quit fearmongering and scaring seniors and I suggest that they help us to develop a plan that will actually help people.

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Lise Zarac LaSalle—Émard, QC

Mr. Speaker, there is nothing but rhetoric coming from the Conservatives when it comes to pensioners, when in fact the Conservatives have not provided any help for them. On the contrary, they failed them on income trusts, they tried to cut the guaranteed income supplement and now the government is telling the 75% of the population who do not have a pension plan to get lost.

Why are the Conservatives abandoning Canadian families when it comes to old age security?

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, we have done a lot to help seniors, who built our great country. We have increased the age credit amount not once, but twice. We have also introduced pension splitting, which has helped a number of families reduce their taxes.

We are helping seniors in our country. They should support us from time to time.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Paule Brunelle Trois-Rivières, QC

Mr. Speaker, rather than taking advantage of the crisis in Egypt and his meeting with President Obama to promote the oil sands, the Prime Minister should be concentrating on developing clean, renewable energy sources. For example, the eco-energy program for renewable electrical power will soon expire and the government has not shown any willingness to provide more funding for it.

Will the government use the upcoming budget to announce new money specifically for the development of wind and solar energy?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands
Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, we are so enthused about this that everyone wants to get up and answer the question.

We are very proud of the $10 billion that we have put toward clean energy over the past five years. We have created jobs, we have provided a cleaner environment, we have served consumers and we have saved consumers money.

Given that we are in an economic recovery, we are reviewing all our programs. The member opposite will have to wait for the budget, as does every other Canadian.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Paule Brunelle Trois-Rivières, QC

Mr. Speaker, while the government is preoccupied with yesterday's oil economy, the Bloc Québécois is proposing that we invest in the green economy of the future.

Why is the Conservative government refusing to provide more funding for research and development in solar and wind energy when this program benefits both the environment and the economy?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands
Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, the Bloc knows full well that it benefits from oil sands, as well as everyone else in Canada.

It is the second largest oil reserve in the world. It is responsible for the creation of almost 150,000 jobs across Canada. All the provinces benefit from that.

As I mentioned, we put $10 billion into clean energy over the past few years. We will continue to protect the environment and we will continue to work toward new clean energy projects.

Post-Secondary Education
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Robert Carrier Alfred-Pellan, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative government has announced an investment of $275 million in compensation for financial aid for students. This is an important first step that the Bloc Québécois and civil society have been calling for for a long time. However, we are still waiting for over $800 million to bring federal post-secondary education transfers back to 1994 indexed levels.

When does the Conservative government plan on correcting the fiscal imbalance that still exists in education?