House of Commons Hansard #10 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was air.

Topics

Science and Technology
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Cambridge
Ontario

Conservative

Gary Goodyear Minister of State (Science and Technology) (Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario)

Mr. Speaker, our government's number one priority is the economy. That is why we have increased overall the NRC's budget by 17% to support research, to help businesses and to help the economy.

On top of that funding, we provided temporary two year stimulus funding to the NRC under the economic action plan. As everybody should know, that ended on March 31.

G8 Summit
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Prime Minister said that the G8 report contains, and I quote, “...some interesting recommendations and observations.”

The Auditor General called what he found “very unusual and troubling”.

Does the Prime Minister really believe that the misuse of $50 million is just “interesting”?

G8 Summit
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, in fact, it was not $50 million. It was about 10% or 20% less than that.

The Auditor General made some observations and recommendations to this government and to Parliament on how we could have greater transparency and openness. We have fully accepted those recommendations.

While I am on my feet, let me thank Sheila Fraser for the outstanding job she has done for Canadians over the past 10 years.

Asbestos
Oral Questions

June 16th, 2011 / 11:40 a.m.

NDP

Romeo Saganash Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, QC

Mr. Speaker, every day, work is underway in the House of Commons to decontaminate members' offices that contain asbestos. The offices are being decontaminated because asbestos is carcinogenic and harmful to human health.

Could the member for Mégantic—L'Érable, who is so proud of chrysotile, tell this House whether he wants the asbestos in his colleagues's offices to be replaced with chrysotile, which is allegedly less carcinogenic, or would he rather continue to export his hypocrisy to third-world countries?

Asbestos
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, I want to clear some things up. For 30 years, Canada has been promoting the safe and controlled use of chrysotile nationally and internationally, and all recent scientific journals report that chrysotile can be used safely in a controlled environment. That is not at all what the member on the other side of the House is talking about.

Asbestos
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Romeo Saganash Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, QC

Mr. Speaker, Conservative support for the asbestos industry is indefensible. Quebeckers and communities alike want their miners to be safe and do not want to be global exporters of asbestos into the developing world.

Unions, doctors and even Health Canada agree asbestos causes cancer. When will the minister stand up for what is right and agree to put chrysotile asbestos on the UN's list of hazardous materials?

Asbestos
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada has been promoting the safe use of chrysotile nationally and internationally for 30 years. Scientific journals report that chrysotile can be used safely in a controlled environment.

Oil and Gas Industry
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, companies are becoming increasingly interested in unconventional energy sources such as shale gas. However, the public knows very little about how shale gas is extracted. For example, hydraulic fracturing is very controversial and has not been thoroughly studied.

Can the Minister of the Environment tell us if he has any studies on this and what its environmental impact is?

Oil and Gas Industry
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, hydraulic fracturing is a rather old technique in terms of conventional oil production, but it is relatively new with regard to shale gas. Provincial and federal governments share in the responsibility of regulating the oil and gas sector. The regulation of shale gas is mainly a provincial and territorial responsibility, except on federal lands. Research is being conducted.

Oil and Gas Industry
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, fracturing uses massive amounts of water mixed with very toxic chemicals. Yet the government does not require that companies disclose the nature of the products used. The mixture that is injected into the ground can contaminate the groundwater and waterways.

Will the federal government finally require companies to report what they are putting into our soil, as the Americans have done?

Oil and Gas Industry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, as I said, the principle responsibility rests with the provinces and the territories. The federal government has an interest and can involve itself when a threat is perceived and reported.

As my colleague knows, Environment Canada is responsible for regulating toxic substances under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act and where required, we will intervene.

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Devinder Shory Calgary Northeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, we all know that international trade is a kitchen table issue. It creates jobs and accounts for almost 60% of our annual GDP.

This weekend in Vancouver the NDP members will be discussing many different issues, including trade. We urge them to reject proposals that advocate for a complete withdrawal from our current free trade agreements.

Could the Minister of International Trade explain to the House why we are pursuing such an ambitious free trade agenda and why these socialist proposals are absolutely wrong?

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Abbotsford
B.C.

Conservative

Ed Fast Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, on May 2, Canadians gave this Conservative government a very clear mandate to build our economy and expand our trade relationships. The member is right: trade is a kitchen table issue. In fact, Canadians intuitively know that trade is critical to our future prosperity and our long-term economic security.

We as the Conservative government are getting things done. Why are the NDP members not?

Child Care
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Jean Crowder Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canadian families are struggling to pay for child care. The Conservatives are insulting Canadians by ignoring this problem. Their policy does not make sense and is unfair.

When will the minister have the courage to admit that her policy has failed Canadian families? When will she get to work on making child care affordable for all Canadians?

Child Care
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, that is exactly what we did when we came to office five years ago. We established the universal child care benefit.

This was to help Canadians access the form of child care that they thought was best for their children. We believe in choice for Canadians.

We also provided funding to the provinces to help them create child care spaces in case the parent's choice was for formal daycare. Since then, in using those funds, the provinces have created over 100,000 spaces to help parents raise their children in their choice.