House of Commons Hansard #10 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was justice.

Topics

Hull—Aylmer
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Nycole Turmel Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to begin by thanking my constituents, the people of Hull—Aylmer, for placing their trust in me and electing me on May 2 to represent them here in the House.

Our work has already begun and issues such as protecting Gatineau Park, protecting public service jobs and a possible ferry between Aylmer and Kanata remain our priorities.

We are committed to moving forward on these issues and working with representatives of all levels of government to achieve them.

I would like to take this opportunity to recognize the 35th anniversary of Outaouais en fête, a festival to be held from June 23 to 26.

I would like to thank Mr. Perreault of Impératif français, as well as the event's organizing committee and all of the volunteers, who will contribute to the success of this national celebration, even though Canadian Heritage refuses to support the event.

Pensions
Statements By Members

June 16th, 2011 / 11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Scott Armstrong Cumberland—Colchester—Musquodoboit Valley, NS

Mr. Speaker, the official opposition is gathering in all its elements this weekend at the NDP national convention in Vancouver. Here the NDP will discuss radical hard left policies that have no room in mainstream Canadian politics.

I would like to highlight one plan from the Canadian Labour Congress that proposes a Canada pension plan premium increase that will raise taxes on hard-working Canadians and job creators. This is a risky scheme that will raise taxes on Canadians across this great nation. The NDP is so open to such a policy that it has actually proposed it twice in resolutions 3-02-11 and 3-03-11.

NDP members, who are out of touch, have to realize that they are now the official opposition and that there is no room in the mainstream of Canadian politics for radical policies such as this one.

Daniel Lessard
Statements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Denis Coderre Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am very proud and honoured to pay tribute today to a man who has decided to call it quits after 42 years as a journalist.

Daniel Lessard is one of those great journalists who made a difference in the wonderful world of politics. Having witnessed first-hand the major debates of the past few decades, he put things into perspective and was always a reliable source of information. Someone once said that integrity breeds credibility. Daniel Lessard helped build the reputation and credibility of the Radio-Canada newsroom and various current affairs programs, such as Les Coulisses du pouvoir.

I was interviewed often by Daniel. His interviews were a reflection of the man himself: respectful, honest, straightforward, without airs, but always determined to get to the bottom of things.

The Liberal Party of Canada and I wish him a happy retirement. Thank you, Daniel, for a magnificent career. Enjoy these tranquil moments with Debra and your sons, Christian and Charles-Adrian. We hope to see you again and we can hardly wait for your historical novel.

Good luck and thank you.

New Democratic Party
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière, QC

Mr. Speaker, while our Conservative government remains focused on Canadians' priorities, the economy and employment, the NDP will be meeting in Vancouver to develop policies that it will defend as the official opposition. One of these policies results from fabrications of the radical left: a work year of only 45 days.

That is the NDP's idea of employment insurance reform.

Last year, the Canadian Federation of Independent Business described this idea as fiscally irresponsible.

If ever it were put into practice, this idea would cost Canadians at least $7 billion and would permanently increase contributions by 35%. Like the NDP's other tax increases, it would kill employment and stall our fragile economic recovery.

While our Conservative government is bringing Canadians back to work, the NDP is looking for ways to pay Canadians for only 45 days of work. The NDP has lost touch with reality and with Canadian families.

Daniel Lessard
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, after a 43-year career, accomplished journalist Daniel Lessard is turning off his microphone.

This native of Beauce started his career in Montmagny, on the CKBM airwaves. He then worked in this region for CJRC before heading to Montreal, where he worked for CKAC.

He started working for Radio-Canada some 30 years ago, and remained there for the rest of his long and very successful career.

He hosted the famous Ce soir in the late 1970s, and then moved to Parliament Hill to become a radio, then television, correspondent, covering the most important events of our time.

As a television host and a key witness to his era, with an unparalleled ability to break down complex issues, Daniel Lessard left his mark on Parliament Hill and in people's homes. After spending the last six years hosting Les Coulisses du pouvoir, his retirement is much deserved.

We wish Daniel Lessard a happy retirement and many happy times together with his family.

Economic Action Plan
Statements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

John Carmichael Don Valley West, ON

Mr. Speaker, our government remains committed to the priorities of Canadian families, jobs and the economy.

That is why last week, in the next phase of Canada's economic action plan, a low tax plan for jobs and growth, our government took a stand for the GTA. We have made significant investments in greater Toronto to support economic and social development.

Through the renewal of local infrastructure, support for culture, sport and the environment, we have stood up for Toronto. Toronto responded by electing its strongest team in a generation, a Conservative team.

We have supported the Harbourfront Centre, the Royal Conservatory of Music, and next year, the 100th Grey Cup. We are improving nearshore water and eco-system health in the Great Lakes.

Our government is standing up for the GTA's priorities: jobs and the economy.

Labour Relations
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Toronto—Danforth
Ontario

NDP

Jack Layton Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, Canada accepts and protects the rights of workers to collectively bargain. This is a normal process that should not be interfered with. With its special bills, the government is clearly siding with management and is taking away the right of workers to use legal pressure tactics.

Why is the government so quick to interfere in a legitimate negotiating process?

Labour Relations
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, as of yet, management and the union have been unable to reach an agreement. They are threatening to do significant damage to the Canadian economy, which this government finds unacceptable. We will act in the best interests of the Canadian economy and the people of Canada.

Labour Relations
Oral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Toronto—Danforth
Ontario

NDP

Jack Layton Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, we have to let the parties come to an agreement. The government should not be getting involved so early on in the process and picking winners. The workers are currently fighting to protect their pensions. They do not have a choice, because the government did not do what was necessary to strengthen and protect the retirement pensions of workers here in Canada.

Why does the government want to impose a pension model that leaves people to fend for themselves?

Labour Relations
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I do not accept the Leader of the NDP's statements in this regard. The reality is that these two parties are threatening to do significant damage to those who are not at the table. It is the government's responsibility to protect the best interests, the broader interests, of the people of Canada, and we will take action to do so.

Labour Relations
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Toronto—Danforth
Ontario

NDP

Jack Layton Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the government should be protecting the right of seniors to security and an economic future they can count on. However, now we see, with the government's interference in the current labour dispute, the real motive. The government is backing executive bonuses in the millions instead of standing behind pensioners and retirees who are trying to protect their future.

The government's approach on pensions is going to leave the next generation with a burden that it will not be able to handle, a social debt for the future. It should be our job to ensure that retirees can age with dignity.

What the government is doing is wrong. Why is it leaving people to fend for themselves--

Labour Relations
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The right hon. Prime Minister.

Labour Relations
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, what the leader of the NDP said has nothing to do with the government's legislation. The reality is that we have two parties, management and the union, that have been unable to come to an agreement after some months of negotiation.

As a consequence of their inability to come to an agreement, they are threatening serious damage on a wide swath of the Canadian public. This is not acceptable to the Canadian government or to the economy, and we will act to ensure that those who are not at the table have their interests protected.

Labour Relations
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, back-to-work legislation is an unjustified interference with the rights of workers to free collective bargaining. The government's failure to address the pension crisis is what is really at stake here. The fact is that Conservatives are choosing a side. They are strengthening the position of large employers who want to dismantle defined benefit pension plans.

Why is the labour minister siding with the dismantlement of pensions?

Labour Relations
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Halton
Ontario

Conservative

Lisa Raitt Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, I would like to begin by indicating that the hon. member's characterization of labour law in Canada is completely incorrect.

It is also important to note that there are no sides being taken in any kind of legislation that may be put before the House. We are on the side of the economy and of general Canadian interests because we want these parties to make a deal. If they cannot make a deal, we will help them in the process to do so with the least amount of damage to the Canadian public.