House of Commons Hansard #23 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was economy.

Topics

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, we have been negotiating with the British Columbia government for four years. Other provinces have recognized that the agreement is a fair one. It is certainly cost effective for them, and they have accepted.

After four years of intensive negotiations, I have indicated to the minister in British Columbia to bring forward the matters that she wants brought forward. She has not done that at this point. There is still some time. I am waiting. I have not heard from her.

The time is coming to an end. November 30 is the date by which she must make up her mind on behalf of the people of B.C.

Copyright
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Gord Brown Leeds—Grenville, ON

Mr. Speaker, strong copyright laws protect jobs and ensure our economy remains strong. Our government's copyright reform is widely supported by consumers, creators and the businesses that drive Canada's economy.

Could the Minister of Canadian Heritage tell the House about the copyright modernization act?

Copyright
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, as we said in the campaign and in the throne speech, the focus of our government this fall is on economic growth and ensuring there is job growth as well. That is why we have tabled our copyright reform legislation.

Bill C-11, the copyright modernization act, balances the interests of consumers and creators with the central goal of drawing investment into Canada, protecting jobs and ensuring that we move forward.

The Canadian Chamber of Commerce agrees with our bill. It said that this bill “lays the foundation for future economic growth and job creation”. Françoise Bertrand of le Fédération des chambres de commerce du Québec said that this bill is “critical to ensuring a competitive and stable business environment in Canada”.

This bill has been tabled and we hope for its adoption. We hope for the opposition's support for Canadian jobs.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Sean Casey Charlottetown, PE

Mr. Speaker, a Canadian Forces member receives $13,000 for funeral costs. A veteran receives $3,600. Nineteen months ago we raised this issue. The answer we received was that it was under review.

Last year we asked the minister again to fix this problem. Even though his own officials raised it with him, he told a Senate hearing that it was not the time to talk about the matter. Yesterday we received another non-answer.

Our veterans have done their job. They served and defended Canada. Why will the minister not do his and fix the situation now?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Lévis—Bellechasse
Québec

Conservative

Steven Blaney Minister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I am glad to say that on this side of the House we not only speak for veterans, but we act for veterans.

As I told the member yesterday, this program is managed by the Last Post Fund. It is doing an outstanding job. We fund the Last Post Fund.

We are making sure that every military member who is killed or injured during service, whatever his or her rank, is well served and will be treated with respect until the last moment of his or her life.

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Hoang Mai Brossard—La Prairie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the United States Internal Revenue Service is going after innocent Canadians The IRS is now going after Canadian citizens who have been playing by the rules, living and paying their taxes in Canada, in some cases for decades. It is going after them for thousands of dollars. These are not tax cheats.

Why is the government not doing more to protect these law-abiding citizens?

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, we have made it clear to the American authorities that Canada of course is not a tax haven, that the request for information from American citizens who are living in Canada affects a large number of citizens who have never earned income in the United States and many of whom were not aware of their obligation under American law, which is their right to file income tax returns.

We have asked the Americans to exercise some discretion in the IRS with respect to these demands.

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

LaVar Payne Medicine Hat, AB

Mr. Speaker, advocates of the Canadian Wheat Board's monopoly have been waging a dirty, underhanded campaign against our government's strong mandate to deliver on our election promise of marketing freedom. They have tried every trick in the book, including wasting thousands of dollars on illegitimate surveys and travelling road shows.

Allen Oberg, the chair of the CWB, even used farmers' money to host and pay for a breakfast for the NDP caucus in Quebec City, telling the NDP members to use any means necessary to disrupt the democratic process in this chamber.

Could the minister tell us what steps he has taken to help western Canadian farmers?

Agriculture and Agri-Food
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Battlefords—Lloydminster
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Gerry Ritz Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for Medicine Hat for his tireless work on behalf of farmers and the great work that the panel did.

The old Canadian Wheat Board, as my colleague outlined, is doing everything possible to fight marketing freedom, even refusing our offer to co-chair this industry working group. That is unfortunate.

Our government will use the recommendations of this dynamic working group to make sure farmers have the clarity and certainty they need for their farm businesses' future.

As of October 1, the government's advance payment program will be administered by the Canadian Canola Growers Association.

Our government has a strong mandate and we will deliver on marketing freedom.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

September 29th, 2011 / 2:55 p.m.

NDP

Rathika Sitsabaiesan Scarborough—Rouge River, ON

Mr. Speaker, last night, I joined MPs from all parties in hosting a screening of the documentary, Sri Lanka's Killing Fields . It moved me, as it did everyone else there.

Sadly, Canada and the rest of the world has stood idly by for far too long. Human rights organizations around the world are calling upon the United Nations to launch an independent inquiry into the possibility of war crimes and crimes against humanity in Sri Lanka.

A Conservative MP helped sponsor the event last night. Will his government now stand in the House today and finally commit to fighting for justice for Sri Lankans and call for a United Nations inquiry?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we did not sit idly by at the United Nations on Monday where I brought the plight of human rights violations to the floor of the General Assembly. The Prime Minister did not sit idly by when he expressed grave concern about attending a future summit of the Commonwealth in Colombo. We did not sit idly by when we spoke with the high commissioner to Sri Lanka and raised our concerns. I did not sit idly by last week when I met with the foreign minister of Sri Lanka to express our significant concerns.

We have not sat idly by. We will continue to stand up, do the right thing and fight for human rights around the world, especially in Sri Lanka.

Copyright
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

André Bellavance Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, multinationals and the software industry will be pleased with the copyright bill the government is introducing today, but it will cost artists close to $75 million a year. By attacking the livelihood of creators in this way, the Conservatives are showing that, for them, culture comes down to profit for big business.

Is the government aware that the copyright legislation that it is proposing will harm artists and weaken Quebec culture?

Copyright
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, we introduced a bill that is fair to everyone, both creators and consumers. What artists across the country need right now is copyright legislation that will make piracy illegal in Canada. That is what Bill C-11 will do.

We are also imposing the WIPO Internet treaties. Many aspects of this bill protect the interests of Canada's artists, ensure that our economy continues to recover, and ensure that we are creating employment and investments here in Canada for everyone, including creators.

Business of the House
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, as is often the case, we would like to know what the plans are for the rest of the week. In particular, the official opposition would like to know when the government will finally bring before the House its so-called priorities, that is, the economy and jobs. It seems we have seen everything but the economy and jobs since they arrived.

It is thanks to the NDP official opposition that today the House is debating, for the first time this fall, the economic issues that are so important to worried Canadians. We are debating a motion calling on the government to take action on the economy, to establish a plan to create real jobs for Canadians and their families, to address Canada's infrastructure deficit of over $100 billion, which is mortgaging our future and that of future generations, and to protect people's retirement pensions.

Now the NDP has proposed concrete actions to address these issues, and I am sure the government will support them.

Also, could the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons tell us when we can expect the debate on the amendments the government is proposing to the Copyright Act?

Business of the House
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, with the global economy still fragile, Canadians gave our government a strong mandate to continue our focus on the economic recovery. In the next week, our government will continue to implement the economic action plan that will create more jobs and economic growth. This plan is working.

Today, we introduced the copyright modernization act. The bill would promote innovation, keep Canada's digital economy strong and, importantly, help create jobs. I hope the bill will have the support of all hon. members.

Next week, we will be introducing a bill to implement the remaining measures in the next phase of Canada's economic action plan, a low tax plan for jobs and growth, as the finance minister indicated yesterday. The bill will include important economic measures, including a tax credit for the creation of new jobs by small businesses.

As per the order passed by the House yesterday, we will be introducing and voting on the ways and means motion relating to that second budget implementation act on Monday.

I know the opposition has shown great interest in seeing our jobs plan rolled out. Next week, members will have the opportunity to support it and move it swiftly through second reading and get this important bill to committee as soon as possible.

Next Tuesday will be designated as the second allotted day. Tomorrow we will begin debate on Bill C-7, the Senate Reform Act. This bill will allow and encourage provinces to hold elections to fill Senate seats and create a nine-year term limit for senators.

We will also continue debate on Bill C-4, Preventing Human Smugglers from Abusing Canada's Immigration System Act. Both bills will also be debated on Monday.

These important bills all have a very long history before the House, so I do encourage all hon. members to put aside further parliamentary delay tactics and give members a chance to vote on them and allow them to proceed through our system.