House of Commons Hansard #187 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was first.

Topics

Liberal Party of Canada
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Jim Hillyer Lethbridge, AB

Mr. Speaker, when the Liberal member for Ottawa South suggested that Albertans do not belong in Parliament, the Liberal leader said that his remarks did not really reflect the views of the Liberal Party. However, we must make no mistake; this is not just one Liberal gone astray.

When asked if Canada would be better off with fewer Albertans in government, the front runner for the Liberal leadership said, “I'm a Liberal, so of course I believe that”.

The anti-Albertan attitude of the Liberal Party has not changed a bit since Pierre Trudeau shackled Alberta with the national energy program that devastated the entire Canadian economy.

Even though the member for Papineau said that Canada belongs to them, Albertans know that it belongs to everyone across the country, every province and every region. That is why we are proud to support our strong national Conservative government made up of MPs from all across the country who stand united in representing our ridings as we build on Canada's legacy of freedom, equality, happiness and prosperity.

Conservative Party of Canada
Statements By Members

November 28th, 2012 / 2:20 p.m.

NDP

Glenn Thibeault Sudbury, ON

Mr. Speaker, I imagine, if I were a Conservative MP waking up this morning to news about new vehicle emissions standards, I would probably rise in the House and say something like this: The Conservatives are imposing a $36 billion car tax on Canadians. This car tax will increase the price of cars, first by $700, and then by $1,800.

Who would ever be foolish enough to impose a $36 billion car tax on the shoulders of Canadians?

The Conservatives are raising prices on everything. The economy would be lost. All jobs would be lost. Even families would be lost.

Now, if I were a dishonest man, I might rise and say something like that but I am a New Democrat and in the NDP we value honesty. So we will not call this the Conservatives' $36 billion car tax on Canadians. No. We will simply call it like it is: more Conservative hypocrisy and incompetence.

Liberal Party of Canada
Statements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Kevin Sorenson Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals' elitist attitude against Alberta is one of the many reasons their party is losing support among Canadians.

This should come as no surprise. The member for Ottawa South had to resign as senior spokesman for natural resources for telling us to go back to Alberta if we wanted to defend the interests of Albertans.

We also recently learned that a top contender for the leadership of the Liberal Party went on a rant against our province, stating, “Canada is in bad shape right now because Albertans are controlling our community and social democratic agenda. That is not working”.

No matter how many times the Liberal Party tries to re-brand itself, these comments prove what Albertans already know: The Liberals are still the party of the national energy program and continue to disrespect Alberta.

We were told to go home by the Liberals. This is strange advice coming from such a small little corner of our Parliament today, the Liberal Party.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the finance minister said that Canada was “not in need of a contingency plan” to deal with the threats facing our economy. That was quite a surprise because, just two weeks ago, the same finance minister said, “we have contingency plans not only with respect to the fiscal cliff, but with respect to the European situation”. Which is it?

Facing the real threat of another recession, do the Conservatives have a contingency plan or not? Canadians deserve a straight answer.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Minister of Citizenship

Mr. Speaker, of course this government is and will continue to be prudent in our fiscal and economic planning. That is why we have the best fiscal position in the G7. It is why we have the best job creation record among the major developed economies. It is why the OECD says that we will have the best economic growth for many years to come.

Mr. Speaker, I will tell you about contingencies. If we ever had an NDP government, we would need a contingency for massive, out-of-control spending, at least $56 billion in unbudgeted new spending committed by that party, in part to be financed by a $21 billion carbon tax.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Leader of the Opposition

Here is the problem, Mr. Speaker. First thefinance minister claims that he has a contingency plan and then the same finance minister says that he does not need a contingency plan. Now the Conservatives are saying that maybe they do have a contingency plan after all, but they pretend to know something different from the finance minister who claims that he does not need a contingency plan. Canadians deserve better than this. The Prime Minister and his Minister of Finance cannot get their stories straight.

If the contingency plan exists, will they stand up and table it in the House, instead of doing like that minister and trying to avoid the issue?

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Minister of Citizenship

Mr. Speaker, the Leader of the Opposition has once again confirmed that the New Democrats tend not to even read the budget before they decide how they will vote on it. If he were to read the last budget or any of the last five budgets, he would see that there is a line in each one of those budgets for any unexpected emergencies.

This government has planned prudently all along. That is why we paid down $40 billion in federal debt before the global economic downturn. We have reduced taxes to create wealth and new jobs, with over 820,000 net new jobs since the downturn.

However, we know this much. If the NDP ever had its hands on the levers of our economy, Canadians would be drowning in new debt and high taxes.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, Europe is experiencing another recession, the American economy is about to hit a budgetary wall and the IMF is saying that Canada's economic growth is already below that of the United States. Canadians have the right to know what is really going on instead of just getting idiotic answers like the one we just heard.

What this government has is a Prime Minister and a Minister of Finance who are contradicting each other, a deficit elimination target that changes twice a week, and a contingency plan that is there one week and gone the next. When will the Conservatives realize that improvising is bad for the economy?

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Minister of Citizenship

Mr. Speaker, this government is always fiscally and economically prudent. That is why we have the best fiscal position in the G7, the best economic growth and the best job creation record, with over 820,000 new jobs since the global recession.

The problem is that the NDP wants to impose new taxes on Canadians, including a $20 billion carbon tax, to subsidize the party's completely reckless spending. We will continue in that direction—

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Parkdale—High Park.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Peggy Nash Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, this has been hard week for the Minister of Finance. Yesterday, he made a mistake when he said that the Conservatives would keep their promise to balance the budget.

Their election platform projected a $2.8 billion surplus in 2014, but in his economic update, the finance minister said that there will be an $8.6 billion deficit, a discrepancy of over $11 billion.

What services will be cut in order to keep the Prime Minister's election promise?

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Minister of State (Finance)

Mr. Speaker, the first thing we would cut would be a $21 billion tax that is purported to be the only NDP solution it has to getting back to balance. The New Democrats vote against everything that we put forward. All of our budgets have kept us on track. Our plan is working. We will get back to balance in the medium term. In fact, we expect to get back to balance in this Parliament.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Peggy Nash Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative platform seems to have gone the way of the minister's contingency plan: out the door to be forgotten forevermore. However, the reality is that compared to the platform of the Conservatives, they are off by $5.9 billion next year, $8.8 billion the year after that, $11.4 billion off the next year and, finally, $6.9 billion the year after that.

Does the minister really consider this massive $33 billion in cumulative bad projections to be a small sum of money?

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Minister of State (Finance)

Mr. Speaker, the number she has referred to is actually quite small compared to the $56 billion that the New Democrats have suggested they would take out of the pockets of Canadians in all of their plans. The New Democrats stand and put forward all sorts of crazy ideas on how they would raise money, but our plan is working.

The chief economist at the OECD says, “the Canadian economy is doing well” and “the Canadian economy is doing much better than the most of the other advanced economies”. We should be listening to comments like this, not listening to the NDP talk down Canadians.

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the organization Campaign Research, which has done a lot of work for the Conservative Party, launched an unprecedented and, if I may so, a reprehensible campaign, using your own words, in the constituency of my colleague from Mount Royal. That organization has now been censured by the Marketing Research and Intelligence Association, which has described the acts, omissions and public statements as reducing confidence in the marketing industry.

When are the Conservatives going to cut ties with this organization? When are they going to take some responsibility for their own malfeasance?