House of Commons Hansard #81 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was registry.

Topics

2 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

It being Wednesday, we will now have the singing of the national anthem led by the hon. member for Don Valley East.

[Members sang the national anthem]

Foreign Investment
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Green

Elizabeth May Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pursue a matter that I have addressed to members of the honourable Conservative benches in relation to state Chinese-owned investments in the oil sands. I have been attempting to discover what national security reviews and what foreign investment reviews took place.

The hon. Minister of Industry told the House that the government has improved transparency. In fact the recommendations for greater transparency to the government in 2009 were explicitly rejected. I will be pursuing this matter in the House. I call on my hon. colleagues to help us get to the bottom of this.

Canadians want to know, if we are selling out Canada's interests to China, who is minding the shop? Which foxes are minding the chicken coop?

National Prayer Breakfast
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Colin Mayes Okanagan—Shuswap, BC

Mr. Speaker, on February 2, I attended the National Prayer Breakfast in Washington D.C., hosted by the President of the United States.

Over 3,500 delegates representing government, business and clergy leaders from the United States as well as from 123 countries attended the breakfast. Eric Metaxas, who authored many books including the compelling stories of William Wilberforce and Bonhoeffer, was a keynote speaker. The theme of the event was the great commandment contained in the Good Book: “Love thy neighbour as thyself”, and “serve one another in love”.

Public policy, military strength or redistribution of wealth is not the recipe for peace in the world. Only the divine spirit of love will overcome oppression, hate and aggression. This message is so simple to see. Why is it so hard to attain?

It was encouraging to attend this event with so many world leaders who understood solutions for world peace lay in the hearts of mankind and not in the might of mankind. Love is a little word. Only people can make it big.

Flooding in Montérégie
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Tarik Brahmi Saint-Jean, QC

Mr. Speaker, in my riding, the Richelieu River frequently floods, causing expensive damage to the property of many residents. Floods like those that occurred in 2011, which affected many Montérégie families, could have been prevented.

The federal government has a history of ignoring the recommendations made in many studies that it commissioned, recommendations to carry out infrastructure work as quickly as possible. Once again, this government stood by, doing nothing, and once again, rising water levels turned the lives of thousands of my constituents upside down.

What will it take for the government to act?

A class action suit was recently filed claiming damages in excess of $200 million. I support these angry citizens, and I ask the government to keep the promises made in 1937 and build the infrastructure needed to protect people living near the river.

Carpenter Hospice
Statements By Members

February 15th, 2012 / 2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Mike Wallace Burlington, ON

Mr. Speaker, my wife and I had the honour to attend the 10th anniversary gala for the Carpenter Hospice in Burlington.

Since May 2002, the Carpenter Hospice has served more than 1,200 residents who have ranged in age from 21 to 103. The hospice provides individuals who are dying with high quality palliative care in a home-like setting. It meets their physical, emotional and spiritual needs, making the last days of their lives together with their families peaceful, comfortable and meaningful.

The Carpenter Hospice is blessed with an incredibly dedicated team of caring volunteers and staff. I want to thank all those individuals, community groups and businesses that have contributed to the hospice. They have provided an opportunity for families and friends to gather and to celebrate life with those close to their heart. The residents of Burlington thank the Carpenter Hospice for being there for them for the last 10 years.

May God bless the Carpenter Hospice family and the families it serves.

National Flag of Canada Day
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Judy Sgro York West, ON

Mr. Speaker, it was on this day in 1965 that, under the watch of Liberal Prime Minister Lester Pearson, the Maple Leaf flag was first raised over the Peace Tower here in Ottawa. Since that day, nearly half a century ago, the Maple Leaf has served as a banner and as a beacon to millions.

For more than 47 years the red and white Maple Leaf flag has fluttered over our heads as a reminder that this nation has been built through the hard work and dedication of both those born here and those who have adopted Canada as their home. Together, we have constructed a society that cares for the vulnerable, values our seniors, educates our children and celebrates the diversity of languages, cultures and beliefs ascribed to by our neighbours.

Canada's national flag may be unpretentious but it represents so much more. It represents a trust that is placed in each one of us, to leave our children a Canada better than the one given to us.

National Flag of Canada Day
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Wladyslaw Lizon Mississauga East—Cooksville, ON

Mr. Speaker, today we celebrate National Flag of Canada Day. It has been 47 years since our national flag was inaugurated. Our national flag, designed by George Francis Gillman Stanley and John Matheson, made its first appearance on February 15, 1965. Now the date is celebrated annually as National Flag of Canada Day.

Although simple in design, Canada's flag well reflects the common values we hold so dear: freedom, peace, respect, justice and tolerance. The Maple Leaf flag pays homage to our geography, reflects the grandeur of our history and represents our national identity. Canada's flag is a symbol that unites and honours Canadians of all origins who through their courage and determination have helped to build, and are continuing to build, our great country.

Let us be proud of our flag. Let us recognize how privileged we are to live here in Canada, this magnificent country that encompasses our history, our hopes and our future.

Hooked on School Days
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Isabelle Morin Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, Quebec is marking Hooked on School Days this week, February 13 to 17. As a high school teacher myself, I know that dropout prevention is a key factor in ensuring that Canadians get a good education and succeed in life. Fourteen regions in Quebec have organized hundreds of activities to mobilize communities and rally around our youth to talk to them about hard work, perseverance, the risks associated with dropping out and the advantages of having a diploma.

I would like to commend the work of Academos E-mentoring, an organization in my riding of Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine that helps students connect with professionals who can guide them in their career planning. I would like to congratulate the youth employment agencies in Marquette, West Island and NDG. I would also like to congratulate the elementary and secondary schools that have organized appreciation galas, merit galas, scholarships, plays and all kinds of activities to promote staying in school.

Dalbé-Viau and Jean XXIII secondary schools, Martin-Bélanger elementary school, the Jeanne Sauvé adult education centre and the Lester B. Pearson School Board will be particularly active in this week's events. Congratulations.

I would also like to thank West Island Youth Action, the Lachine and NDG youth round tables, the Comité d'action—

Hooked on School Days
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Calgary West.

Firearms Registry
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Rob Anders Calgary West, AB

Mr. Speaker, this evening there will be an important vote to save taxpayers money. I would like to thank the members of Parliament from Yorkton—Melville and Portage—Lisgar for their hard work and dedication to abolish the Liberal gun registry.

Allan Rock promised that this registry would only cost $2 million. Access to information reports have proved it cost over $2 billion that should have been used to crack down on real criminals. All the registry has done is target law-abiding citizens while doing nothing to reduce crime. People are being forced to navigate red tape, waste time filling out forms and deal with bureaucracy.

We will destroy all records pertaining to the registration of long guns. Our government instead is enacting important mandatory minimum sentences for drive-by shootings. We are also creating longer sentences and tougher bail conditions for using a gun in the commission of another crime.

Once again, I urge all members of Parliament to vote for abolishing the long gun registry.

Stan Reynolds
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Blaine Calkins Wetaskiwin, AB

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to mark the passing of one of Alberta's most prominent historical collectors. On February 9, 2012, Alberta lost Stan Reynolds, the inspiration of the Reynolds-Alberta Museum, at the age of 88.

Stan was born in Wetaskiwin in 1923. He joined the Royal Air Force in 1942, where he served in a night fighter squadron that defended Britain during the Second World War. Upon his return to Wetaskiwin, Stan opened a used car dealership, which became so successful that it established Wetaskiwin as a major centre for auto sales.

Stan was always passionate about Alberta's history. He often collected machines that played a major part in Alberta's development. Through this, Stan was able to obtain many artifacts. They were displayed in the Stan Reynolds Museum, which he owned and operated for nearly two decades. In 1981, Stan donated 850 of his most important pieces to the Province of Alberta, which provided a foundation for the Reynolds-Alberta Museum, established in 1992.

Stan received the Alberta Order of Excellence in 1999, the Order of Canada in 2000. In 2009, he was inducted into Canada's Aviation Hall of Fame for his role in preserving aviation history.

I want to thank all members of the House for taking a moment to honour the life of Stan Reynolds, one of Wetaskiwin's, Alberta's and Canada's great citizens. I know he will be missed.

HMCS Vancouver
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Randall Garrison Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, this weekend friends and family will gather at CFB Esquimalt, home of the Canadian Maritime Forces Pacific, to welcome home HMCS Vancouver. It has been deployed overseas since July 2011.

I look forward to joining the 225 families of the Vancouver ship's company as they welcome home the sailors, helicopter detachment and command team as they arrive back from the Mediterranean.

The Vancouver crew, helicopter squadron and command team have performed bravely and steadfastly overseas for these many long months. In doing so, they have once again proven Canada's commitment to peace, democracy and international security.

I salute also the bravery and hard work of the families who have been busy at home running households and taking care of children while their loved ones have been away. I also recognize the work of the many community groups which have helped provide support to military families, especially the Military Family Resource Centre.

Congratulations also to the Esquimalt base personnel and Pacific Fleet command for their ongoing support while the Vancouver was away. On behalf of the residents of Greater Victoria, I extend a hearty welcome home and thanks to all the Vancouver ship's company.

National Flag of Canada Day
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

John Carmichael Don Valley West, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Maple Leaf forever. It was not our flag until this date in 1965, but our flag has become part of us. It reflects our courage and determination as we work together to build this great country.

Although it was not the flag of Sir John A. or Mr. Diefenbaker, it is our flag today. It was our flag when we welcomed the world at Expo for our centennial, when Paul Henderson defeated the Soviets 40 years ago, and when we send the men and women of the Canadian armed forces overseas to defend freedom and the rule of law.

We are proud to be here representing Canadians under our single red maple leaf that was raised 47 years ago. On behalf of our Conservative government, I would like to wish all Canadians a happy Flag Day.

Firearms Registry
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Anne-Marie Day Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, unfortunately, we are a few hours away from the abolition of the long gun registry that taxpayers have worked hard to pay for. The NDP has been saying loud and clear: this registry is useful. The police use it 17,000 times a day on average, and it costs taxpayers only $4 million a year to maintain it.

I want to acknowledge the exceptional work of dozens of groups and associations that have fought on behalf of women and children who are victims of violence. I have tremendous admiration for the committee known as Ensemble contre la violence faite aux femmes, which has dedicated time and resources in the national capital region to ensuring that the voices of those wanting to keep the registry were heard. I want all the courageous women who vehemently opposed the abolition of the long gun registry to know that there is still hope. The NDP is fighting to defend the interests of women. We are working tirelessly to build a Canada that is safer, more sensible and more humane.

Firearms Registry
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Robert Sopuck Dauphin—Swan River—Marquette, MB

Mr. Speaker, Canadians gave our government a strong mandate to end the wasteful and ineffective long gun registry once and for all. Today members from all sides of the House will vote on the future of this useless measure that has needlessly treated law-abiding hunters, farmers and sports shooters like criminals.

Farmers, ranchers, loggers, hunters, anglers, outfitters and trappers make up my riding of Dauphin—Swan River—Marquette. Hunting is a part of my culture and my way of life, as it is for many of my constituents. They are honest country people who work hard and play by the rules. That is why we find the long gun registry so offensive. The long gun registry is an attack on our way of life, pure and simple.

This is a good day for Canadians, as we will move an important step closer to truly standing up for law-abiding citizens. Our government is focused on measures that keep Canadians safe rather than measures that merely attempt to make them feel safe.

I call on all members of the House to listen to their constituents rather than their backroom party bosses and vote to scrap the long gun—