House of Commons Hansard #88 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was liberal.

Topics

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, in fact what I said was that we have to start now to make sure that we are taking action before there is an absolute crisis. We want to make sure that Canadians have access to OAS today, but also for future generations. As the population of seniors grows dramatically over the next 20 years, the proportion of people who are in the workforce to pay for that is going to be cut roughly by half.

We need to take action. We need to start taking it now to make sure that everyone will have access to OAS.

Science and Technology
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

NDP

Dan Harris Scarborough Southwest, ON

Mr. Speaker, last month when 6,000 scientists from around the world met in Vancouver, the minister for science could not be bothered to show up. Now the world's leading scientific journal, Nature, has condemned the government for muzzling its scientists.

We know that the Conservatives do not follow scientific advice, but it is indefensible to block others from hearing it. Will the minister issue a clear directive permitting scientists to speak to the public, or is he afraid that the evidence will not help his party's ideological agenda?

Science and Technology
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Cambridge
Ontario

Conservative

Gary Goodyear Minister of State (Science and Technology) (Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario)

Mr. Speaker, let us be very clear on who is standing up for scientists. On this side of the House we have delivered more funding investment to the science and technology community than any time in our nation's history. Every single time we have added more money for scientists to do more work and to discover more cures for various health issues, the NDP has voted no. We are standing up for scientists. The NDP is not.

41st General Election
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, on the Conservative robocall election fraud allegations, the Prime Minister continues to use the same tactics and the same lines the Conservatives used on the in-and-out scandal, where the Conservative Party eventually pleaded guilty to election fraud.

In this latest devious venture with allegations swirling around them, they are suggesting the Conservative Party should review all tapes before Elections Canada. For what reason? Why should Conservative operatives review the tapes first?

41st General Election
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Conservative

Dean Del Mastro Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, there are too many mistakes in the statement made by the member for me to correct them all in the time I have.

What I can say is we know that the Liberals spent millions of dollars to make hundreds of thousands of calls during the election. We also hear that Liberal supporters claim to be irritated by calls claiming they were calling on behalf of the Liberal Party.

Surely the onus is on the Liberal Party to explain these complaints from their supporters on these calls. Is it not plausible to the member that these very calls were the calls that the Liberal Party paid millions of dollars for, and this is nothing but an unsubstantiated smear campaign from the Liberal Party?

41st General Election
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Justin Trudeau Papineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, last year the Conservatives pleaded guilty to election fraud for sketchy accounting practices. They just do not learn. The Guelph campaign filing reports no relationship with RackNine, but on the very day of the fraudulent Pierre Poutine robocalls, their campaign repeatedly called RackNine.

When are the Conservatives going to come clean with Elections Canada, with the RCMP, and with Canadians who deserve the truth?

41st General Election
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Conservative

Dean Del Mastro Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, of course the Conservative Party did no such thing in the settlement with Elections Canada. The member knows this full well. He is misrepresenting it to the House.

I want to be clear on the issue of Guelph. What is alleged to have happened in Guelph is unacceptable. We want to get to the bottom of this. The Conservative Party is assisting Elections Canada in this regard.

41st General Election
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Lise St-Denis Saint-Maurice—Champlain, QC

Mr. Speaker, we have learned that, in an act of despair, the Conservatives are reviewing all tapes of telephone calls made during the last election, even though they defended themselves by stating that they ran a clean campaign. The RCMP, not the party suspected of committing fraud, should be reviewing the tapes.

When will the Conservatives hand over all the documents to the RCMP?

41st General Election
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, we need to recognize that the Liberals are saying that their supporters were irritated by calls from people who said they represented the Liberal Party. These calls originated in the United States. We have learned that the Liberals paid millions of dollars to call centres to make hundreds of thousands of calls. We have also learned that the Liberal candidate in Chilliwack admitted that he paid a call centre operating in the U.S. Perhaps the Liberals should explain the origin of these calls.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, last week we brought to the attention of the House 90-year-old World War II veteran, Ted Shiner from Bedford, who was denied VIP services.

This week on the minister's desk, he has the file of Mr. Louis Dionne and his wife, Muriel, from North Vancouver. Mr. Dionne is 97 years old and as of yesterday is hospitalized. He is about to be released to go home. His 89-year-old wife said she is unable to look after him. They applied for VIP services, but they were told it will take 16 weeks before they get an answer. Mr. Dionne is 97 years old. When is the government going to help the Dionne family?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Lévis—Bellechasse
Québec

Conservative

Steven Blaney Minister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, while I cannot comment on the specifics, I can assure the member that the people in my department are devoting their heart and soul to making the lives of our veterans better. This government is committed to that.

We are serving more than 200,000 veterans, families, spouses, widows and RCMP. We are delivering the VIP and other programs to them.

I have instructed my officials to give the best service to our veterans in a timely manner.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, the minister just said that the department looks after only 200,000 people. There are 750,000 retired military and RCMP veterans and their spouses and many of them are being denied help by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

The minister can speak about this file because he has it on his desk. We gave it to him two days ago. The Dionne's do not have 16 weeks to wait to get help. They need help as of yesterday.

I am asking a very straight-forward question. Will the minister now tell his officials to provide the help that this World War II hero and his wife so richly deserve?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Lévis—Bellechasse
Québec

Conservative

Steven Blaney Minister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, while I can appreciate the member's question, the real question is, why does the member vote against our budget initiatives?

We introduced the new veterans charter. We introduced enhancements to the new veterans charter. We created the Office of the Veterans Ombudsman. We introduced the helmets to hardhats program.

Why does the member vote against our initiatives? We will stand up for our veterans because they deserve the best.

National Defence
Oral Questions

March 2nd, 2012 / 11:45 a.m.

NDP

Christine Moore Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, the plan for veterans is not the only thing that is missing the mark. When the associate minister went to see Lockheed Martin in Texas last year, it was not because everything was running smoothly. He went there to express his concern over the cost of the F-35s. While the Conservatives were swearing to Canadians that everything was going well, they were saying the opposite to Lockheed Martin.

We want to know: is everything still going well with the F-35 fiasco, or are the Conservatives going to admit that they need a plan B?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, that is not true. As always, the hon. member is speaking against the interests of the Canadian Forces, against the interests of our aerospace industry.

Our government is determined to obtain the best equipment for the Canadian Forces, at the best price for Canadians in order to provide the best benefits for businesses and workers in Canada.